Annual Security and Fire Safety Report 2020

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Sections in this Report


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NOTE ON GENDER-INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE: Portions of this Annual Security and Fire Safety Report utilize they/them/their as singular pronouns.


Letter From the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Dave Tedjeske smiling in uniform

Villanova University strives to be a caring and welcoming community, rooted in the principles of Veritas, Unitas, Caritas—Truth, Unity, Love. For the University, part of this effort is making sure that our campus is a safe place for our students and employees to live, work and learn. 

In Fall 2016, the Department of Public Safety (Public Safety) began its transition from a Security Department to a sworn Police Department. University Police Officers have full arrest powers and several defensive weapons, including firearms. Public Safety currently has approximately 23 sworn Police Officers, along with approximately 52 non-sworn Public Safety Officers. As important as this transition has been, it is only one aspect of the University’s efforts to keep students, faculty, staff, and visitors safe while on campus. Public Safety prides itself on community engagement, educational programming and communication to support its overarching goal of a safe and secure campus. 

Following an on-site assessment in 2019, Villanova’s Department of Public Safety was awarded accreditation in Fall 2019 by the Pennsylvania Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission (PLEAC), an accrediting body for police departments in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Accreditation helps to ensure that the policies and methods by which Public Safety operates are consistent with the best practices in the University campus police and security arena. 

In this Report you will find valuable information about the University’s safety and security policies, crime statistics, emergency procedures, and fire safety policies and statistics, as well as the many resources available through Public Safety. Additional safety and security information can be found on the Public Safety website, which I encourage you to visit. If you prefer speaking with someone, you can always reach Public Safety by phone at (610) 519-5800 for general inquiries. 

Thank you for taking the time to review the information included in this Report. By working together, we can all make Villanova’s campus a safer place. 

Sincerely,

Dave Tedjeske signature

David G. Tedjeske
Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

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Villanova University Department of Public Safety: Who We Are and What We Do

Villanova University has devoted significant resources to providing a safe campus for its community members. The Department of Public Safety, located in Garey Hall, is responsible for providing law enforcement services and for maintaining the security and safety of the campus community. The Department of Public Safety consists of approximately 75 Officers, including both sworn Police Officers and non-sworn Public Safety Officers who provide on-campus coverage 24 hours a day, seven days a week. To provide the greatest breadth of coverage, the Officers patrol the campus on foot, on bicycle and in vehicles. 

Emergency call boxes are located throughout the campus and parking lot areas in order to provide emergency assistance to the Villanova community. Call boxes offer a direct link to Public Safety to report an emergency, such as a suspicious person or circumstance, a medical emergency, or to request a safety escort. See the map at the end of this brochure for the call box locations. 

Villanova University’s Police Officers have law enforcement authority and responsibility for enforcing Federal and State laws, University Policies and for making arrests. Villanova Police Officers have the responsibility and authority for patrolling the Campus Area and responding to calls for service, including reported crimes, as defined in a Memorandum of Understanding, (MOU) between the Radnor Township Police Department and the Villanova University Police Department described below. Villanova non-sworn Public Safety Officers do not have arrest authority and have no legal authority upon which to enforce criminal laws; however, they do have the authority to enforce University Policies. The University supports and encourages the making of prompt, accurate reports to the University.

Public sfaety officer smiling in uniform

Both Villanova University’s sworn Police Officers and nonsworn Public Safety Officers are well-trained professionals. The Police Officers are certified Officers in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and are held to the same training and credentialing requirements as any other Police Officer in the Commonwealth. Most shift supervisors are either certified Police Officers or certified EMTs. Both Police Officers and Public Safety Officers receive on-going training from both internal and external entities and in the form of in-service training. 

The MOU between the Radnor Township Police Department and the Villanova University Police Department addresses agreements between the Departments regarding the provision of law enforcement services on campus and in the surrounding area. The MOU addresses various topics including, but not limited to: the physical jurisdiction of the Departments; procedures and responsibility for responding to and investigating various specific crimes; procedures for requesting assistance from the other Department; and guidelines for other administrative processes. 

The MOU also addresses the physical jurisdiction of the Villanova Police Officers which includes Villanova enforcing the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on all non-dedicated roadways in the Campus Area, including all intersections except for the following public streets (including sidewalks within the legal rights of way) upon which Radnor Police shall possess enforcement responsibility: County Line Road, Lancaster Avenue, Spring Mill Road and Ithan Avenue. Villanova Police may exercise jurisdiction outside of the Campus Area, including the streets identified above, under numerous conditions and will turn the case over to the Radnor Township Police Department as soon as possible in such cases. 

Villanova sworn Police Officers and non-sworn Public Safety Officers have jurisdiction to conduct security and safety patrols on campus property as well as on public roads that are adjacent to or adjoining campus property. Officers address violations of University Policy, monitor parking and traffic on campus, prepare written reports, investigate suspicious circumstances, address immediate safety hazards and exclude trespassers when appropriate. 

The Villanova Department of Public Safety maintains a good working relationship with the Radnor Township Police Department and other surrounding Police Departments. These Departments meet regularly to discuss issues of common concern and to identify areas where they may be helpful to each other in the performance of their jobs.

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Villanova University’s Campus Security

Residence Halls 

In the Spring of 2019, the University housed approximately 4,400 undergraduates in 26 campus facilities. In the Fall of 2019, the University opened six new residence halls and housed approximately 5,300 undergraduates in 32 campus facilities. Accommodations ranged from traditional residence halls to halls with apartment units. First-year students were assigned housing and roommates by the Office for Residence Life. Upper-class students participated in a housing selection process and chose their room assignment and could also select roommates. Changes in room assignments were made upon reasonable request, as space permitted. 

Access to Residence Halls 

Students living in residence halls are provided with card access to operate the lock on their own room door. Key access is available as an emergency backup. Outside main entrances to all residence halls, except for St. Rita’s, Corr and St. Mary’s, are locked 24 hours a day, seven days a week with access controlled by a computerized card access (Wildcard) system. Secondary exterior doors are designated as “exit only” or “emergency exit only” and are locked to the outside. Windows are equipped with locks operable by room occupants. The residential portions of St. Mary’s, St. Rita’s and Corr Halls are locked and controlled through the Wildcard system 24 hours a day, seven days a week. However, the outside entrances to those three buildings are unlocked to accommodate access to offices on the first floor of St. Rita’s and Corr, as well as offices, instructional facilities, dining facilities and recreational facilities in St. Mary’s. In addition, hallway access to one room in St. Rita’s Hall is possible through the Campus Ministry suite; however, the suite is staffed when the Campus Ministry outside doors are unlocked during normal business hours.

Hand swiping Wildcard for access

Security of Residence Halls 

University sworn Police Officers and non-sworn Public Safety Officers patrol the exterior and interior of all campus residence halls as part of the normal patrols. In addition, CCTV cameras are installed throughout the campus in both interior and exterior locations. CCTV cameras and card access systems are viewable centrally by Public Safety Dispatchers as well as by Officers at three other fixed post locations throughout the campus. The University encourages resident students to report crimes, unsafe conditions, and suspicious behavior by contacting the Department of Public Safety. 

University policies, safety and security measures and behavioral expectations are made available to all students on the University’s website and are reviewed at the first hall floor meeting of each semester. Other topics related to safety and security are discussed in ad hoc educational programs and as particular circumstances require. During low-occupancy periods, such as University breaks, access to the residence halls is restricted via the card access system. Students who receive permission to remain in residence during these periods are required to register with the Office for Residence Life. All invited guests are expected to share the same responsibility for the community as do its members. Even so, resident students are personally responsible for the behavior of or damages caused by their guests. Resident students will be held strictly accountable for violations of University policy by their guests. 

Security of and Access to the University’s Academic and Administrative Facilities

 The University has the capability via the Wildcard system to control access to many buildings and entrance gates on campus. Like most card key systems, the Wildcard system is an access control system, not a security system. The Wildcard system regulates access by allowing only designated users access into a given area and creates an access log. The Wildcard system also allows Public Safety to monitor many exterior doors on campus to ensure that they are not propped open. Villanova is a private institution. University academic or administrative activities are given first priority for the use of Villanova’s facilities, with second priority given to programs of University groups.

If others wish to use University facilities, prior registration through the appropriate University administrative offices is required. The University allows residents of the nearby community to use certain University facilities, including athletic facilities and fitness centers in the Davis Center, upon registration and payment of a small annual fee. Guests are generally not required to show identification when using academic or administrative facilities; however, the University reserves the right to ask for identification from anyone present on Villanova’s property. 

Permission for guests and visitors to be present on campus grounds and buildings is a revocable privilege. University sworn Police Officers and non-sworn Public Safety Officers have the authority to remove guests or visitors who fail to produce identification upon request or otherwise fail to abide by University regulations. Non-sworn Public Officers patrol the University’s academic and administrative buildings on a routine basis to monitor security and safety needs.

Public safety officer at desk with computer monitors

Physical Campus Security Considerations 

University facilities and landscaping are maintained to minimize hazardous conditions. Parking lots and pathways are illuminated with lighting. In addition, Lighting Reports are compiled monthly by the Department of Public Safety and forwarded to the Office of Facilities Management for appropriate action. Additional security concerns such as malfunctioning door locks or other physical conditions are reported and addressed in a timely manner to enhance the security and safety of the campus community. Members of the University community can assist in these efforts by reporting hazard issues or concerns to the Department of Public Safety or to the Office of Facilities Management. 

Reporting Criminal Actions or Other Emergencies on Campus 

Students, faculty, staff and visitors are encouraged to accurately and promptly report all potential crimes, suspicious behavior, medical, fire or other emergencies to the Department of Public Safety, by calling 4444 or 9-4444 from an on-campus telephone or (610) 519-4444 from an outside telephone or cell phone. Public Safety Dispatchers are available at these telephone numbers 24 hours a day, seven days a week to answer calls. The University’s safety app, Nova Safe, may also be used to report emergencies. When contacting Public Safety through the app, the Dispatcher is able to see the caller’s GPS location, name and any other information the caller chooses to make available to Public Safety. For more information, please visit the Nova Safe webpage

In response to a report, the Department of Public Safety will dispatch an Officer(s) to the caller’s location to file an incident report or ask the victim to report to Public Safety to file an incident report. All reported crimes will be investigated by the University and may become a matter of public record. Public Safety incident reports involving Code of Student Conduct violations are forwarded to the Dean of Students Office for review and for potential action, as appropriate. In the case of a medical, fire or criminal emergency, the Department of Public Safety notifies the appropriate emergency personnel. 

When necessary, a follow-up investigation is conducted by the appropriate law enforcement agency as described in the MOU with the Radnor Township Police Department. Additional information obtained via the investigation will also be forwarded to the Dean of Students Office. If assistance is required from the Radnor Township Police Department or the Bryn Mawr Fire Company, Public Safety will contact the appropriate agency and resources.

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Communicating About Security Matters

Villanova University encourages accurate and prompt reporting of all crimes and emergencies to the Villanova University Department of Public Safety or appropriate police agency including when the victim elects not to, or is unable to, make such a report. The reporting of crimes to the Department of Public Safety aids in providing timely warning notices to the community, when appropriate, and to ensure inclusion of reportable incidents in the annual crime statistics. In addition, the Department of Public Safety will assist victims with making reports to the appropriate police department, if the crime occurred outside the jurisdiction where Villanova Police Officers can respond to and document the crime. 

The Department of Public Safety provides a variety of services to the University community, including: 

  • Proactive patrols of all buildings and campus grounds 
  • Campus escort service, which provides vehicle or walking escorts to visitors and campus community members: call (610) 519-4444 
  • Response to medical and other emergencies 
  • Courtesy transports to the Student Health Center or local hospital 
  • Emergency mass notification using the NOVA Alert system, which is used to send emergency notification alerts to cell phones and email accounts 
  • Fire and intrusion alarm monitoring and response 
  • Nightly security patrols in and around selected residence halls 
  • Crime prevention programs 
  • Courtesy vehicle jump-starts and lockout assistance 
  • Lost and found 
  • Special event coverage 

Additional safety tips and information regarding the services provided by the Department of Public Safety are available on the Public Safety website.

Voluntary and Anonymous Reporting 

Villanova University permits victims or witnesses to report crimes to certain persons designated by the University as “Campus Security Authorities” (CSAs) (see “Policy on Preparing the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report” in the Villanova University Policies section.) Reports may be made to CSAs on a voluntary, anonymous basis. A full list of CSAs can be accessed at the Campus Security Authorities Master List.

In addition, the University has established a hotline administered by EthicsPoint, a third-party provider, available 24/7 to report crimes and other misconduct on an anonymous basis. 

The hotline allows a student or employee to report any instance of misconduct in the academic or workplace setting. The hotline may be accessed at the Ethics Point website or by calling (855) 236-1443. While anonymous reporting is available on this hotline, the University’s ability to investigate or respond to anonymous reports may be limited. 

Reporting options for cases of alleged violations of the University Sexual Misconduct Policy may be accessed in full. A summary of those options is below. 

If a Complainant reports an incident of sexual misconduct and chooses not to file a formal complaint, supportive measures will remain available to the Complainant. In such cases, the University must weigh the Complainant’s choice against its obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students and employees, including the Complainant. Although rare, there may be times when the University cannot honor a Complainant’s request and the Title IX Coordinator may determine that a formal complaint is necessary in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all community members. 

When weighing such a request by the Complainant, the Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator(s) will consider a range of factors, including but not limited to, the following: 

  • The risk that the Respondent will commit additional acts of sexual or other violence, such as: 
    • a pattern of alleged sexual misconduct by the same Respondent; 
    • whether the Respondent has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of sexual and/or physical violence; 
    • whether the Respondent threatened further sexual violence or other violence against the Complainant or others; 
    • whether the sexual violence was committed by multiple perpetrators; 
  • whether the Complainant’s allegations involved violence, use of weapons or similar factors; 
  • whether the Complainant is a minor; 
  • whether the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of the alleged sexual violence (e.g., security cameras, eye-witnesses or, physical evidence); 
  • whether the Complainant’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., alcohol or drug facilitated sexual violence) at a given location or by a particular group. 

If none of these factors is present, the Title IX Coordinator will likely respect the Complainant’s request to not file a formal complaint. In such cases, the Complainant should understand that the University’s ability to meaningfully address the incident may be limited.

However, the presence of one or more of these factors could lead the Title IX Coordinator to file a formal complaint allowing the University to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue the grievance process and/or involve the law enforcement agency with jurisdiction. In such cases, the University will inform the Complainant and will share the University’s reasoning for proceeding with a formal complaint. The Complainant may still decide whether and how much they want to be involved in any next steps. The University will only share information with those needing to know in order to conduct the investigation and facilitate the University’s response to the report of sexual misconduct. 

The University may consolidate formal complaints alleging sexual misconduct against more than one respondent, or by more than one complainant against one or more respondents, or by one party against the other party, where the allegations of sexual misconduct arise out of the same facts or circumstances. 

Whether or not a report results in a full investigation, the University will remain ever mindful of the well-being of those involved and take ongoing steps to prevent retaliation. The University will take action to assist those involved consistent with their wishes, to the extent possible. A variety of supportive measures are available to those involved as outlined in Appendix B to the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. The Title IX Coordinator, Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator and Respondent Resource Coordinator Teams are available to assist Complainants and Respondents, respectively, in determining what measures are helpful or needed and will assist in the implementation of such supportive measures. 

Finally, the University is committed to a safe environment for all students and employees and to addressing issue of sexual misconduct. Reports of such misconduct provide the University with the opportunity to consider broader remedial action including increased monitoring of campus locations, additional education and prevention efforts, and climate assessments. See additional information regarding confidentiality for incidents of sexual misconduct in the Villanova University Policies section.

Professional and Pastoral Counselors 

By law, Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors”, when acting as such, are not considered to be a Campus Security Authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, the Professional Counselors at Villanova University are encouraged, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis to the Department of Public Safety. 

PASTORAL COUNSELOR 

An employee of an institution, who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and who is functioning within the scope of that recognition as a Pastoral Counselor. 

PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR 

An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling to members of the institution’s community, and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license or certification.

Crime Prevention and Security Awareness Programming 

One of the essential components of any successful crime prevention program is an informed public. It is the intent of Villanova University to inform students of good crime prevention and security awareness practices. 

Both the Office for Residence Life and the Department of Public Safety provide the University community with educational materials on safety and crime prevention in brochures and on their departmental websites. Security and safety programs, including videos and discussions, are presented to students and other interested community members by professional staff members of both departments. 

The Department of Public Safety offers a wide variety of security awareness and crime prevention programming for students and employees. Topics include personal safety awareness, theft prevention, sexual assault awareness, internet safety, alcohol education, Active Shooter Awareness Training, and the Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) self-defense course. Anyone interested in having a Public Safety Officer speak to their classroom or group, should contact them at 610-519-5800. Public Safety works collaboratively with other offices on campus to offer programs geared towards specific groups such as residence hall students, peer educators and members of Greek organizations. (See also Sexual Assault, Sexual Harassment and Other Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Education Efforts in the Villanova University Policies section.) 

During the 2019-2020 academic year, Public Safety offered approximately 40 crime prevention and security awareness programs. Topics such as personal safety, residence hall security, drug and alcohol abuse awareness and sexual assault prevention are some examples of programs offered during the prior academic year. 

Public Safety provides crime prevention and security awareness information during new employee orientation, which is held monthly, and will provide programming tailored to any  department upon request. On average, between four and seven security awareness and crime prevention programs are offered through Public Safety on a monthly basis. All crime prevention and security awareness programs encourage students and employees to be responsible for their own security and the security of others. Participants in these programs are asked to be alert, security-conscious, involved and are advised to call the Department of Public Safety to report suspicious behavior. 

Any student or employee seeking information on attending crime prevention programming should contact the Department of Public Safety at (610) 519-5800. 

Public Safety Officers participate in Resident Assistant (RA) training annually to ensure that RAs are fully aware of safety issues and resources available to Villanova students. Specific policy issues and problems are routinely addressed at residence hall floor meetings conducted by RAs. Public Safety Officers are available to attend floor meetings at the request of an RA to discuss safety concerns. Through these efforts, community members are encouraged to care for themselves, as well as for each other. Additional details concerning student or residence hall regulations are included in the Student Handbook (the “Blue Book”), which is available to all students on the University’s website. Additional details regarding employee policies are included in Human Resources employment policies, available to all employees on the University’s website; for faculty, there is a separate Faculty Handbook, available on the Office of the Provost website.

Timely Warning Notices—Safety Alerts 

In order to aid in the prevention of similar crimes, the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee, at their discretion and in consultation with responsible authorities when time permits, will develop and issue campus-wide timely warnings which are called Safety Alerts. The purpose of Safety Alerts is to notify members of the community about crimes that have occurred on or within the Clery Geography of Villanova University (on campus or on non-campus property or public property) where it is determined that the incident may pose a serious or ongoing threat to members of the University community. Safety Alerts will typically be issued for the following crimes: murder/non-negligent manslaughter, robbery, and major cases of arson. Alerts for the crimes of aggravated assault, motor vehicle theft, burglary, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and other Clery crimes are considered on a case-by-case basis and depend upon a number of factors. These include the nature of the crime, the continuing danger to the campus community—such as whether the perpetrator was apprehended—and the possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts. For example, if an assault occurs between two students who have a disagreement, there may be no on-going threat to other Villanova community members and a Safety Alert would not be distributed. Safety Alerts in response to sexual assaults will be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on when and where the incident occurred, when it was reported, and the amount of information known by the Department of Public Safety. Sometimes these offenses are reported long after the incident occurred, thus there is no ability to distribute a “timely” warning notice to the community. 

Even though not required by law, Safety Alerts may also be posted for other crime classifications and locations, at the sole discretion of Villanova University. Safety Alerts will be distributed to the community as soon as pertinent information is available, in a manner that withholds the names of any victims as confidential and with the goal of aiding in the prevention of similar occurrences.

INTERNET SAFETY: 

The Internet is a powerful resource that connects you to people around the globe and vast information resources. Stay safe when online by following these tips: 

  • Avoid identity theft online. Ensure your privacy and protect your identity. Be very careful when providing your personal information. Do not give sensitive information to anyone you don’t know. 
  • Be sure you’re using a trusted, secure web page before providing sensitive information. 
  • Use complex, hard-to-guess passwords and change them often. Never give your password to anyone. 
  • Protect your computer from Internet compromise by maintaining up-to-date anti-virus and anti-spyware software. 
  • Be careful with email from anonymous senders or from someone you don’t know. 

SOCIAL NETWORKING: 

Make your social network account profiles private. Do not post personal or confidential information to public Internet or social networking sites. Once the information is posted online, it is very difficult to remove it.

PEER-TO-PEER FILE SHARING: 

The unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material, such as through peer-topeer networks, is illegal and violates University policy. 

See the policy for Copyright Infringement and Illegal File Sharing. Students who infringe copyright are subject to (i) discipline under the Code of Student Conduct up to and including expulsion and (ii) statutory damages up to $250,000 per infringed work. 

INTERNET SAFETY RESOURCES: 

Villanova University Computer Usage Policy 

Student Life Online Social Networking 

Public Safety Alerts

Communicating Safety Alerts 

The Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee has primary responsibility for developing the Safety Alerts unless described otherwise in the charts below. All Safety Alerts will be sent by the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee through the campus email system to all Villanova assigned email accounts. All Safety Alerts will be posted on the Department’s website for at least 30 days. Supplemental methods for disseminating Safety Alerts may include, but are not limited to, posting of flyers and news media announcements. The method(s) used will depend on the severity, location, type of incident and the ongoing nature of the threat. A list of current Safety Alerts is available on the Department of Public Safety’s website

Villanova University is not required to issue a Safety Alert with respect to crimes reported to a pastoral or professional counselor or for crimes outside the Clery Geography of Villanova University. 

Safety Advisories 

When a pattern of less serious crimes occurs in a limited geographical area, which in the University’s judgment does not represent a serious or ongoing threat requiring the issuance of a campus-wide Safety Alert, the University may post Safety Advisories in only the affected area(s). Such notices targeted to specific areas are not always posted on the Department’s website or distributed by means other than posting flyers in the affected area. Safety Advisories are distinct from Safety Alerts and, therefore, are not required to conform to the same standards or procedures as Safety Alerts, which are considered “timely warnings” under the Clery Act. Safety Advisories targeted to a specific area of the campus will be used only for less serious crimes against property, such as theft or vandalism; however, there may be some circumstances where, in the discretion of the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police, a campus-wide Safety Alert may be warranted for a continuing pattern of such property crimes. 

Daily Crime Log 

The Department of Public Safety also maintains a chronological log of all reported crimes for the past 60 days, which is available for public inspection at the Public Safety front desk in Garey Hall from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday excluding holidays. Logged entries older than 60 days, will be made available within two business days upon request to Mrs. Debra Patch, Deputy Chief of Police/ Associate Director for Administration, by email or by phone at (610) 519-6983.

Safety Alert Distribution Matrix: Communication Primary Methods
Primary Mass Email

Dept of Public Safety Website

Primary Message Creator

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police
Back-up Message Creator  Public Safety Designees  Public Safety Designees or Office of University Communication and Marketing 
Authority for Approving and Sending Messages  If time allows, consult with Execu­tive Vice President  If time allows, con­sult with Executive Vice President 
Message Sender  Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police  Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police 
Backup Message Sender  Public Safety Designees  Public Safety Designees 
Safety Alert Distribution Matrix: Secondary Communication Methods
Secondary MyNova (Campus Alerts) Posting On Exterior Doors Nova Alert Press Releases

Primary Message Creator

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Office of Univ.

Communication & Marketing

Back-up Message Creator

Public Safety Designees

Public Safety Designees

Public Safety Designees

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Authority for Approving and Sending Messages

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

Office of Univ. Communication & Marketing

Primary Message Sender

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Office of Univ. Communication & Marketing

Back-up Message Sender

Public Safety Designees

Pubic Safety Designees and Residential Life Staff

Public Safety Designees

Office of Univ. Communication & Marketing Designees

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Emergency Preparedness Procedures

University Crisis Response 

Villanova has an extensive Emergency Management Plan in place that includes procedures to promote a rapid response to an unanticipated emergency or threatening situation. This Plan outlines incident priorities, campus organizations and specific responsibilities of particular departments or positions. The University Emergency Management Group* is responsible for developing emergency response and continuity of operations plans for departments and personnel, as appropriate. The Department of Public Safety coordinates and provides resources and guidance for the development of these plans. 

The University views all incidents affecting campus safety as serious and time critical, and routinely examines the Emergency Management Plan and devises new measures to respond to various incidents as quickly and effectively as possible. When a serious incident occurs, the first responders to the scene are usually the Villanova University Department of Public Safety, the Villanova University EMS agency (VEMS), the Radnor Police Department and/or the Bryn Mawr Fire Company. These agencies respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the nature of the incident, other Villanova University Departments and other local emergency response agencies or State or Federal agencies could also be involved in responding to the incident. 

If a situation arises on or around campus that could potentially threaten the health or safety of University community members, senior officers of the University and members of Public Safety are immediately summoned as part of Villanova’s crisis response procedure. University Police Officers and Public Safety Officers, supervisors and administrators are trained in crisis response and have the authority to take immediate action in response to an imminent crisis, using the Emergency Management Plan and departmental procedures as a guideline. 

These actions may include: 

  • Deployment of additional University Police Officers and Public Safety Officers 
  • Summoning of Local, County or State emergency responders and/or emergency management officials 
  • Enhanced patrol of the campus 
  • Closing of roads and entrances onto campus 
  • Securing of campus buildings and residence halls 
  • Evacuation of campus buildings and residence halls 

In the event of an emergency on or off campus, the University community’s physical and emotional well-being is critically important. Villanova provides full-service counseling services to students through the University Counseling Center, located in the Health Services Building, as well as access to Campus Ministry staff, who are trained to provide crisis and grief counseling. Further information about these resources can be found at the Grief and Loss webpage

Full-time employees can take advantage of counseling services offered through Health Advocate, the University’s Employee Assistance Program, at 866- 799-2728.

*The Emergency Management Group (EMG) is led by the Executive Vice President. Other members of the EMG include the Vice President for Facilities Management, Provost, Vice President for Student Life, Vice President and General Counsel, Vice President for University Communication and Marketing, Vice President and Chief Information Officer, Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police and Director of Environmental Health and Safety. Several other University officials serve on the EMG when the situation dictates. These include the Vice President and Director of Athletics, Director of the Student Health Center, Associate Vice President for Human Resources, Dean of Students and Assistant Vice President for Residence Life, Director of Insurance and Risk Management and Director of Dining Services.

Emergency Communication and Support 

Villanova has developed a process to notify the campus community in cases of emergency. While it is impossible to predict every significant emergency or dangerous situation that may occur on campus, the following identified situations are examples which may warrant an emergency (immediate) notification after confirmation: armed/hostile intruder; bomb/explosives (threat); communicable disease outbreak; severe weather; terrorist incident; civil unrest; natural disaster; hazardous materials incident and structural fire. 

In the event of an emergency, Villanova University will provide immediate notifications to the appropriate segment(s) of the University community upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students, employees and visitors. An effective University-wide communications process is vital to provide the greatest safety possible for the University community. As part of its Emergency Management Plan, the University has adopted a formalized procedure for issuing emergency alerts to the campus community. When on-duty Public Safety Officers become aware of a situation that may warrant the issuance of an emergency alert, the on-duty Public Safety Supervisor confirms there is a significant emergency and then immediately contacts the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee. The Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee quickly evaluates the situation to determine if an alert is warranted, then develops the content of the notification message and determines the appropriate segment(s) of the campus community who will receive the notification. In situations where an imminent threat is present, the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee has the ability and authority to issue an alert without further consultation with any other University official. 

Depending on the size and scope of an incident or emergency, Villanova University may establish an Emergency Call Center, where members of the University community and general public can call for information about the incident. The Emergency Call Center can be ready to help the University respond to an issue or crisis 24/7, 365 days a year; can simultaneously activate 20 geographically dispersed call centers; and can handle up to 3,000 calls per hour. 

In emergency situations lacking the presence of an imminent threat, the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or his designee, will consult with the Executive Vice President and/or other members of the Emergency Management Group, local first responders, public health official(s) and/or the National Weather Service, as applicable, prior to an alert being issued. The University, based on the judgments of members of the Department of Public Safety and/or the University Emergency Management Group, will endeavor to immediately notify the campus community (or appropriate segments) upon the confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of students, employees or visitors occurring on the campus. The Department of Public Safety and Office of University Communication and Marketing will collaborate to determine the content of the message and will use some or all of the systems described below to communicate the threat to the Villanova Community or to the appropriate segment of the community, if the threat is limited to a particular building or segment of the population. 

The University will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system to the appropriate segments of the campus community, unless issuing a notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate an emergency. The University will endeavor to make such notification sufficiently specific so as to enable recipients to take an appropriate response to the threat. 

The communication tools may include some or all of the following methods: 

  • NOVA Alert: Important emergency alerts, notifications and updates are sent to all registered devices, including cell phone (via SMS/texting); email account (work, home, other); and smartphone/PDA. Students and employees may opt into the NOVA Alert system when entering cell phone information into the University’s records management system, Novasis. 
  • Building Fire Alarm Systems: Used to notify occupants of a building of the need to evacuate. 
  • Villanova Website: Critical information is posted on the Department of Public Safety homepage and may be viewed both internally (students, faculty and staff) and externally (parents, alumni and other constituents). Through this website, the University will provide updates to the community as needed. 
  • Email: Broadcast emails are sent to Villanova students, faculty and staff, as well as alumni, if appropriate. 
  • Telephone: Broadcast voicemails may be sent to faculty and staff and can be accessed both on and off campus through individual voicemail accounts; emergency phones are located in every wing and on every floor in all residence halls. Critical information is posted on the Villanova Emergency Hotline, (610) 519-4505; this information is accessible to any constituent, including parents. 
  • Personal Interaction and Connection: Public Safety personnel and other University staff may make personal contact or have face to face communication with people in buildings on campus. 

Students, parents and University employees can register for NOVA Alert and can check the website for information and updates. To sign up for Nova Alert, log into the My Nova portal and search “Nova Alert” for the Nova Alert sign up page. The Nova Alert system allows users to provide two cell phone numbers for receiving text messages as well as six voice phone numbers, two email addresses, and one TTY device. Students, faculty, and staff can also update their cell phone and Nova Alert information through the My Nova portal. The Office of University Communication and Marketing, in consultation with the Emergency Management Group, is responsible for developing and disseminating emergency information to the surrounding community. 

The methods used to communicate to the surrounding community may include press releases to local media outlets, announcements made on the University website and email messages to local neighborhood groups and associations. 

Follow up information for immediate notification to the community may be distributed using some or all of the systems (except fire alarms) listed in the Emergency Notification Distribution Matrix below.

Emergency Notification Distribution Matrix: Primary Communication Methods
Primary Email (All Campus)

Nova Alerts System

Primary Message Creator

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police
Back-up Message Creator  Public Safety Designees  Public Safety Designees 
Authority for Approving and Sending Messages  If time allows, consult with Execu­tive Vice President  If time allows, con­sult with Executive Vice President 
Message Sender  Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police  Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police 
Backup Message Sender  Public Safety Designees  Public Safety Designees 
Emergency Notification Distribution Matrix: Secondary Communication Methods
Secondary Telephone Broadcast Voicemail Digital Signage Public Safety Website Face To Face Communication and Alarm Systems

Primary Message Creator

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Office of Univ.

Communication & Marketing

Back-up Message Creator

Public Safety Designees

Public Safety Designees

Public Safety Designees or Office of Univ. Communication & Marketing

Public Safety Designees

Authority for Approving and Sending Messages

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

If time allows, consult with Executive Vice President

Office of Univ. Communication & Marketing

Primary Message Sender

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

UNIT (University Information Technology)

Department of Public Safety or Public Safety Designee

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Back-up Message Sender

Public Safety Designees

N/A

UNIT (University Information Technology)

Public Safety Designees and Residence Life Staff

Off-Campus Emergencies 

Public Safety officials receive text message alerts from the Delaware County Office of Emergency Management regarding incidents in Delaware County that could imminently impact the safety of the Villanova University community. When appropriate, the Department of Public Safety notifies the University community of off-campus threats that could also represent a serious or continuing threat to students, employees and visitors 

Emergency and Evacuation Procedures 

The emergency evacuation procedures are tested at least twice each year. Students and employees learn the locations of the emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation. The Department of Public Safety does not tell building occupants in advance about the designated locations for long-term evacuations because those decisions are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. In both cases, Department of Public Safety staff on the scene will communicate information to students regarding the developing situation or any evacuation status changes. 

The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of a fire or other emergency. At Villanova University, evacuation drills are used as a way to educate and train occupants on fire safety issues specific to their building. During the drill, occupants ‘practice’ drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm. 

Villanova’s emergency and evacuation procedures can be found in the Emergency Guidebook.

The following is a brief description of these procedures: 

BUILDING EVACUATION 

  • All building occupants are required to evacuate when the fire alarm sounds or upon the order of an authorized University official such as Public Safety or Police Officer. 
  • If time permits, stabilize lab procedures, turn off stoves and ovens, and unplug or disable any device that could make a dangerous situation even worse. 
  • Move to the closest exit and proceed down the EXIT stairwell in a safe and orderly manner. Take personal belongings with you. DO NOT use elevators. Know more than one way to exit buildings. 
  • Each building has a designated evacuation location which is 12 reviewed during fire drills. Report to this location. If you do not know the designated location, remain at least three hundred (300) feet outside of the building and wait further instructions. Do not leave the area so that first responders can account for all building occupants. Keep roadways open and beware of approaching emergency vehicles. Notify emergency responders of anyone trapped, especially anyone with a physical disability who cannot evacuate.

LARGE-SCALE EVACUATION 

  • If evacuation of part or all of the campus is necessary, monitor NOVA Alert, email and the University website for additional information. 
  • Those in need of transportation will be directed to areas to await transport to an off-campus site. 

EVACUATION PROCEDURES FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 

Pre-Planning is important. If you may need assistance evacuating in an emergency, you should pre-plan and contact the Office of Disability Services at (610) 519-4095. Disability Services works with the Department of Public Safety regarding the living arrangements and class schedules of students with disabilities. Employees with disabilities should contact the Public Safety Office directly for assistance in pre-planning assistance that may be needed during emergency evacuations. 

  • Evaluate your need to identify yourself as someone who requires assistance during an evacuation. Some people who may need assistance have no visible disability. 
  • Be prepared to give clear and concise information on how best to assist you. If you have any difficulty speaking, consider using a carry-with-you preprinted message. 
  • Establish a personal network consisting of people who are regularly in the same area as you. Do not depend on any one person as they may not always be available. Assess your own abilities and communicate your capabilities and limitations to those in your network. 
  • Determine all of your evacuation options and prioritize them. Consider the pros and cons of each: 
  • Be carried—You have a chance to get out but you and/or your helpers may be injured in the process. 
  • Evacuation chairs—Evacuation chairs are safer than being carried and you don’t have to wait for the fire department to reach you. These take practice to use safely, however, and the device has to be nearby. 
  • Areas of Refuge—Areas of refuge are fire resistant spaces where people unable to use stairs can call for help by way of two-way communication devices. An area of refuge is a good option if you feel that you may be injured if you evacuate using the stairs; however, they are typically not available in older buildings and you may be overcome by smoke before getting help from rescue personnel. 
  • Use of elevators—Elevators are useful in non-fire emergencies; however, they are shut down automatically if the fire alarm is activated. The elevator shaft can also become a chimney for smoke and the power can go out, leaving the elevator stuck between floors. 

EVACUATING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 

  • Attempt to rescue persons with disabilities during an evacuation only when a person with a physical disability is in immediate danger and cannot wait for professional assistance. 
  • If the building has an Area of Refuge, assist the person with a disability to that area. If possible, at least one person should wait with the person with a disability. For buildings that do not have an Area of Refuge, the person should be moved to the nearest stairwell, or to a room with the door shut which is well clear of any hazardous area. 
  • Ask others leaving the building to notify emergency responders that a person with a physical disability needs assistance in evacuating. Give the specific location. 
  • If waiting for rescue is not an option, two physically capable occupants of the building should be invited to volunteer to assist a person with a disability in evacuating. Ask how the person with a disability can best be assisted or moved, and whether they require any special considerations or items that need to come with the person. Keep in mind that you may need to clear debris in order to safely evacuate. 
  • Do not use elevators unless told to do so by emergency responders.
A public safety officer in uniform

Shelter-In-Place 

Shelter-in-Place is designed to keep you safe while indoors if dangerous environmental conditions exist, such as extreme weather or a hazardous materials release. 

If a Shelter-in-Place is ordered: 

  • If outside, seek shelter in the nearest building, preferably in an interior room with few windows. 
  • Allow access to others seeking shelter. Remember: a Shelter-in-Place order means there are dangerous environmental conditions but NOT any known threat of violent behavior. Allowing others into the building will not jeopardize your safety. 
  • Close all exterior doors, windows and any other openings to the outside. 
  • Avoid overcrowding by selecting several rooms if necessary. 
  • Monitor NOVA Alert and email for further instructions. 
  • Report any emergency or unusual condition to Public Safety. 
  • Do not leave the building until receiving the “all clear” from a Police Officer, Public Safety Officer, NOVA Alert, email or website communication. 

Lockdown 

An imminent threat of violence may be cause for a lockdown of all or part of campus. Some exterior doors will lock automatically. Emergency responders will lock others manually. The goal is to limit exposure of students, faculty and staff to danger by preventing dangerous persons from entering campus buildings. 

If a lockdown is ordered: 

  • Stay inside! Do not leave the building unless an imminently dangerous situation arises inside. If outside, seek shelter in the nearest building. 
  • Take shelter in a lockable room, if possible. 
  • Close windows, shades and blinds, and avoid being seen from outside the room, if possible. 
  • Monitor NOVA Alert and email for updates and further instructions. A description of the actor will be disseminated as soon as possible using these methods. 
  • Report any emergency or unusual condition to Public Safety. 
  • Use discretion in admitting anyone into a secure building. Require that the person seeking shelter open all outer garments for visual inspection before allowing entry. Require that all backpacks and other bags be left outside at least 30 feet from the building. 
  • Once in a secure location, do not leave until receiving the “all clear” from a Police Officer, Public Safety Officer, NOVA Alert, email or website communication. 

Assessment of Emergency Plans 

The University, in conjunction with other emergency agencies, conducts regularly scheduled drills, exercises and appropriate follow-through activities designed for assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities. These tests, which may be announced or unannounced, are designed to assess and evaluate the emergency plans and capabilities of the institution. These include tabletop exercises, field exercises and tests of the emergency notification systems on campus. 

Emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested on an annual basis. Each test is documented by the Department of Public Safety, including the date, time and whether it was announced or unannounced. A summary of emergency response and evacuation procedures are publicized via email in conjunction with at least one test per calendar year that meets all of the requirements of the Higher Education Opportunity Act.

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The University’s Relationship With Local Police

Two emergency response workers help someone in an ambulance

Villanova’s Department of Public Safety responds to complaints on campus and coordinates investigations with outside agencies as necessary. The Department has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Radnor Township Police Department regarding the response and investigation of criminal incidents. The University annually seeks statistical information from local police and files a yearly statistical crime report with the Pennsylvania State Police. Under its Student Crime Reporting Policy, as set forth in the Student Handbook, the University strongly encourages students and employees to report criminal activity immediately to the Department of Public Safety, which will assist in reporting crimes to the local police if requested by the victim.

A Villanova Public Safety officer stands next to a car

It is also Villanova’s policy to communicate on a frequent and ongoing basis with local police officials with respect to any crimes engaged in by students at non-campus locations. 

Villanova University does not operate any off-campus housing or have officially recognized non-campus student organization housing facilities. However, many students live in the communities surrounding Villanova University. Local police, as a courtesy, routinely communicate with the Department of Public Safety, as well as the Dean of Students Office, regarding criminal activity in the surrounding area.

Drug and Alcohol Policy 

The University’s Department of Public Safety employs both sworn Police Officers and non-sworn Public Safety Officers. Through its sworn Police Officers, the University’s Department of Public Safety is responsible for the enforcement of Local and State underage drinking laws and enforcement of Federal and State drug laws and can arrest individuals for violations of Local and State laws regarding alcohol and drugs. In addition, both Police and Public Safety Officers enforce the Code of Student Conduct, and violations will be referred to the Dean of Students Office for potential action. The policies and sanctions are set forth more fully in the Code of Student Conduct, available online in the Student Handbook

Drugs 

The use of narcotics, dangerous drugs and controlled substances without a prescription on University premises, as elsewhere, is illegal. Villanova University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, sale, possession or use of any drug by any of its employees or students in its workplace, on its premises, or as part of any of its activities. The University may also, under appropriate circumstances in the University’s discretion, discipline its employees or students in response to the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, sale, possession or use of any drug outside its workplace or off its campus premises. 

Alcohol 

The possession, use, sale or furnishing of alcohol on Villanova University’s campus is governed by Pennsylvania State law, and the enforcement of these laws is at the discretion of the University and local police. The University’s Department of Public Safety and Resident Assistants refer students suspected of violations to the Dean of Students Office for disciplinary action. 

Villanova University policies permit the lawful keeping and consumption, in moderation, of alcoholic beverages on its property or property under its control by persons of legal drinking age (21 years or older). Students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted by the University to possess and consume a moderate amount of certain types of alcoholic beverages in their own residence hall rooms/apartments (and in another on-campus residence hall room/apartment where at least one resident has attained the age of 21) and designated areas in other University facilities. Alcohol with 15% or greater alcohol by volume is prohibited in University residence halls, regardless of age. Legal-aged students are also permitted to allow legal-aged guests to possess and consume a moderate amount of certain types of alcohol in their residence hall room/ apartment provided the legal-aged resident is present and assures compliance with all University policies as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. 

The University policies prohibit: 

  • Students who are under the age of 21 from possessing, consuming, purchasing, attempting to purchase or transporting alcoholic beverages on or off the campus and from permitting anyone (except current roommates who have attained the legal age) from possessing or consuming alcoholic beverages in their on-campus residence hall rooms/apartments. 
  • The intentional and knowing selling or intentional and knowing furnishing of alcoholic beverages to persons under the age of 21 or to persons obviously inebriated on property owned or controlled by the University or as part of any of its activities. 
  • The consumption of alcoholic beverages by any University employee where the consumption adversely affects job performance and/or endangers the physical well-being of other persons and/or oneself. This includes employees who report for work under the influence of alcohol. 
  • The consumption of alcoholic beverages by any University employee during his/her normal working hours regardless of the effect on job performance unless the consumption occurs in the course of an authorized business or special University function that includes alcoholic beverages or the consumption is otherwise approved by the University. 
  • The consumption of alcoholic beverages or possession of open containers of alcoholic beverages in public places, including hallways, lounges, buildings, outdoor spaces or anywhere on University grounds without authorization from appropriate University officials. 
  • With respect to students, beer kegs in any condition, beer balls, any similar type of common source and their equivalents in volume of beer and/or alcohol content in the residence halls or on campus without authorization; or the use or possession of paraphernalia specifically associated with the consumption of alcohol (e.g., funnels, beer-pong tables, any item associated with drinking games, etc.). 
  • With respect to students, the use or possession of grain alcohol, caffeinated alcoholic energy drinks, powdered alcohol, alcoholic punch, gelatin shots or alcohol with 15% or greater alcohol by volume in the residence halls or on campus. 
  • Driving on campus or in the local community while under the influence of alcohol, or illegal drugs or controlled substances. 
  • Students or student organizations from organizing non- University sponsored events (e.g., ticket parties or list parties) that result in underage drinking, misbehavior or criminal activity, regardless of whether the non-University sponsored event is hosted at a third-party vendor.

In addition, to the extent that the Villanova community serves society by developing and sustaining this environment, and confidently expects its membership to comport themselves in a manner that assures continuance and enhancement of the University, the University reserves the right to exercise discretion in taking disciplinary action against employees or students involved in off-campus activity. 

Students with substance abuse problems may obtain information and seek support services from the Dean of Students Office, Campus Ministry, the Office of Health Promotion and the University Counseling Center. All incoming freshmen are required to satisfactorily complete an alcohol education program called AlcoholEdu® for College. 

Information and support services for University employees with substance abuse problems are available from the Human Resources Department, the University’s Employee Assistance Program, the Office of Health Promotion and the Villanova Center for Campus Ministry. The University contracts with Health Advocate for the delivery of the EAP+Work/Life services to full-time University employees. 

For more detailed information about Villanova’s substance abuse policies, available support services and related educational programs for those with substance abuse problems, see the University’s Policy on Drug- Free Schools and Workplace, distributed annually and available from the Human Resources Department or visit the websites for the departments listed above, which are accessible through the University’s main website.

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Weapons Policy 

Villanova University Police Officers carry firearms in their official capacity. Officers are also equipped with pepper spray, a collapsible baton, and handcuffs. Non-sworn Public Safety Officers do not carry firearms or any other weapon. Outside law enforcement personnel who are authorized to possess weapons may do so within the scope of their authority. No other persons are permitted to possess weapons on University property, even if such weapons are legally registered. 

Sexual Misconduct 

Villanova University seeks to foster and maintain a community of mutual respect and concern for all of its members. There can be no greater violation of the terms of that community, or of the essential dignity of any member of it, than an act of sexual assault, sexual harassment, or other sexual misconduct described in the University Sexual Misconduct Policy. By Policy, sexual misconduct includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence and stalking, as those terms are defined by applicable Federal and State law. These acts constitute the deepest affront to University standards and are prohibited. Villanova University issues this statement of policy to inform the campus community of our programs to address sexual misconduct as well as the procedures for institutional disciplinary action in these cases regardless of whether the incident occurs on or off campus. See the University Sexual Misconduct full policy

Definitions 

There are numerous terms used by Villanova University in our Policy and Procedures. 

SEXUAL ASSAULT—Having or attempting to have sexual intercourse or sexual contact with another person without consent. This includes sexual intercourse or sexual contact achieved by the use or threat of force or coercion, where a person does not consent to the sexual act, or where a person is incapacitated. Sexual Assault includes rape, fondling, incest and statutory rape, defined as follows: 

RAPE—Attempted or Actual Penetration(s): Causing or attempting to cause non-consensual vaginal, anal, or oral penetration, however slight, with any object or body part, with another person. 

FONDLING—Non-Consensual Sexual Contact: The touching of the private body parts of another for the purpose of sexual gratification forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the person in incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. This can include causing the other to touch the harasser’s private body parts. 

INCEST—Incest is sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law. 

STATUTORY RAPE—Statutory rape is sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. In Pennsylvania, individuals under 13 years of age can never consent to intercourse; individuals younger than 16 years of age can never consent to intercourse with a partner more than four years their senior. For more about consent, see CONSENT definition

SEXUAL EXPLOITATION—Sexual exploitation is an act or omission to act that involves taking non-consensual, unjust, humiliating, or abusive sexual advantage of another, either for personal advantage or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the Complainant. Examples of sexual exploitation include but are not limited to the following: 

  • Creating a picture(s), movie(s), webcam, tape recording(s), graphic written narrative(s), or other means of memorializing sexual behavior or a state of undress of another person without the other’s knowledge and consent; 
  • Sharing items described in the paragraph above beyond the boundaries of consent where consent was given. For example, showing a picture to friends where consent to view it was given for oneself only; 
  • Observing or facilitating observation by others of sexual behavior or a state of undress of another person without the knowledge and consent of that person; 
  • Voyeuristic behaviors, such as watching another person or persons, without their consent, while they are undressing, undressed or engaged in sexual activity 
  • Engaging in sexual behavior with knowledge of an illness or disease that could be transmitted by the behavior without full and appropriate disclosure to the partner(s) of all health and safety concerns; 
  • Engaging in or attempting to engage others in “escort services” or “dating services” which include or encourage in any way sexual behavior in exchange for money; 
  • Intentionally, knowingly, or surreptitiously providing drugs or alcohol to a person for the purpose of sexual exploitation; or 
  • Exposing another person to sexually explicit or lewd material without the person’s advanced knowledge and consent. 

STALKING—Stalking is a pattern of repeated and unwanted attention, harassment, contact, or any other course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for their safety, or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress. The course of conduct means two or more acts in which the stalker follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property. This includes cyber-stalking, a particular form of stalking in which electronic media such as the internet, social networks, blogs, cell phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact are used to pursue, harass, or make unwelcome contact with another person. 

SEXUAL HARASSMENT—Sexual harassment is misconduct on the basis of sex that jeopardizes equal access to education and includes: 

  • Quid pro quo in which an employee explicitly or implicitly conditions the provisions of an employment or academic aid, benefit, or service of the University on an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct 
  • Unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it denies a person equal access to a University education program or activity 

DATING VIOLENCE—Includes physically, sexually and/or psychologically abusive behavior that arises in the form of a direct violent act, or indirectly as acts that expressly or implicitly threaten violence. Dating Violence also occurs when one partner attempts to maintain power and control over the other through one or more forms of abuse, including sexual, physical, verbal, financial or emotional abuse. Specifically, Dating Violence is violence or the threat of violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the Complainant. The existence of such a relationship is determined based upon the length of the relationship, the type of the relationship and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. 

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE—Includes physically, sexually and/or psychologically abusive behavior that arises in the form of a direct violent act, or indirectly as acts that expressly or implicitly threaten violence. Domestic Violence also occurs when one partner attempts to maintain power and control over the other through one or more forms of abuse, including sexual, physical, verbal, financial or emotional abuse. Specifically, Domestic Violence is a crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner, or by a person with whom the Complainant shares a child in common. Domestic Violence also includes a crime of violence against a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the Complainant as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the Complainant under domestic or family violence laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or by any other person against an adult or youth Complainant who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT—The term Sexual Misconduct is a comprehensive term that encompasses any unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature and includes dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment and stalking. 

RETALIATION—Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, any form of intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination against any individual because they have made a report or complaint or participated or refused to participate in criminal proceedings or University processes under this policy. Retaliation may be committed by any person or group of people, not just a Respondent or Complainant. It may be committed against the Complainant, Respondent, or person or group of people involved in the investigation and/or resolution of an allegation of sexual misconduct. Retaliation could occur before, during or after an investigation, University proceedings, and/or resolution. 

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS—Sexual misconduct is never excused because a person is intoxicated or impaired by alcohol or other drugs, and the consumption of alcohol or drugs does not diminish one’s responsibility to obtain consent. The University considers sexual contact while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs to be risky behavior because people may abuse the impaired condition of another to commit sexual misconduct. Alcohol and other drugs impair a person’s decisionmaking capacity, awareness of the consequences, and ability to make informed judgments. The use of alcohol or other drugs can limit a person’s ability to freely, affirmatively, and clearly give consent and can create an atmosphere of confusion over whether or not consent has been freely, affirmatively, and clearly sought or given. The perspective of a reasonable person will be the basis for determining whether a Respondent should have been aware of the extent to which the use of alcohol or other drugs impacted a Complainant’s ability to give consent.

BYSTANDERS—Bystanders are individuals who witness emergencies, criminal events or situations that could lead to criminal events and by their presence may have the opportunity to provide assistance, do nothing, or contribute to the negative behavior.

COERCION—Consent must be freely given. Consent is not freely given if it results from the use or threat of physical force, intimidation, or coercion, or any other factor that would compromise someone’s ability to exercise their own free will to choose whether or not to have sexual contact. Coercion includes the use of pressure and/or oppressive behavior, including express or implied threats of harm or severe and/or pervasive emotional intimidation, which (a) places a person in fear of immediate or future harm or physical injury of themselves or another person or (b) causes a person to engage in unwelcome sexual activity. A person’s words or conduct amount to coercion if they wrongfully impair the other’s freedom of will and ability to choose whether or not to engage in sexual activity. Coercion also includes administering a drug, intoxicant, or similar substance that impairs the person’s ability to give consent. 

COMPLAINANT— Refers to the person who reports that they have been the subject of sexual misconduct as defined in University policy and/or under Title IX. 

CONSENT—Consent is an explicitly communicated, reversible mutual agreement in which all parties are capable of making a decision. Consent is informed, voluntary, and actively given. Consent exists when all parties exchange mutually understandable affirmative words or actions indicating their agreement to participate voluntarily in sexual activity. The following further clarifies the meaning of consent: 

  • Each participant in a sexual encounter must obtain consent for all sexual activities. Consent to one form of sexual activity does not constitute consent to engage in all forms of sexual activity. 
  • Consent consists of an outward demonstration indicating that a person has freely chosen to engage in sexual activity. Relying on non-verbal communication can lead to misunderstandings. Consent may not be inferred from silence, passivity, lack of resistance or lack of an active response alone. A person who does not physically resist or verbally refuse sexual activity is not necessarily giving consent. 
  • If at any time it is reasonably apparent that either party is hesitant, confused, or unsure, both parties should stop and obtain mutual verbal consent before continuing such activity. 
  • Consent may be withdrawn by either party at any time. Once withdrawal of consent has been expressed through words or actions, sexual activity must cease. 
  • A person who is physically incapacitated from alcohol or other drug consumption (voluntarily or involuntarily), or is unconscious, unaware, or otherwise physically impaired is considered unable to give consent. For example, a person who is asleep or passed out cannot give consent. 
  • People with a previous or current intimate relationship do not automatically give either initial or continued consent to sexual activity. Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutually understandable communication that clearly indicates consent to engage in sexual activity. 

DEPUTY TITLE IX COORDINATOR—The Title IX Coordinator is supported by several Deputy Title IX Coordinators, all of whom are knowledgeable and trained in Federal and State laws that apply to matters of sexual misconduct, as well as University policy and procedure. The list of Deputy Title IX Coordinators can be found in the “Title IX Notice” in Appendix C of the full Policy. 

DISCLOSURE—Disclosure occurs when a person shares that they have experienced sexual misconduct. Disclosure does not necessarily constitute the filing of a formal complaint. (See Section IV of the full Policy for more information.) 

INCAPACITATION—Incapacitation is the inability, temporarily or permanently, to give consent, because the person is mentally and/or physically impaired due to: illness, disability, voluntary or involuntary alcohol or other drug consumption, and/or being unconscious, asleep, or otherwise unaware that the sexual activity is occurring. In addition, people are incapacitated if they demonstrate that they are unaware of where they are, how they got there, or why or how they became engaged in a sexual interaction. Some indicators of incapacitation may include, but are not limited to, lack of control over physical movements, being unaware of circumstances or surroundings, or being unable to communicate for any reason. 

REPORT—A formal record regarding an allegation of sexual misconduct. 

REPORTING PERSON—Refers to the person who is reporting that they are aware of or have witnessed sexual misconduct, as defined in this policy. This person may also be the Complainant. 

RESPONDENT—The person who is reported to be the perpetrator of conduct that could constitute sexual misconduct. 

RESPONDENT RESOURCE COORDINATOR (RRC) TEAM—The University has designated the RRC team to provide assistance to any student accused of sexual misconduct. The RRC may meet with the Respondent to assist with: obtaining emotional support through counseling; navigating the disciplinary and/or resolution processes; obtaining other supportive measures; and assisting with other questions and concerns. The RRC team also provides ongoing assistance through any University and/or criminal justice review, investigation, or resolution process. Members of the RRC can be reached by emailing respondentresource@ villanova.edu or calling 610-519-8807. Members of the RRC do not act as legal counsel and generally are unable to serve as advisors in University disciplinary proceedings.

RESPONSIBLE EMPLOYEE—All employees (except for confidential resources) must report any and all incidents of sexual misconduct to the Title IX Coordinator or a Deputy Title IX Coordinator (as outlined in the Title IX Notice), regardless of where or when the incident occurred and whether or not the “responsible employee” witnessed the incident or learned of it through the Complainant, Respondent or a third party. 

SAFETY ALERT—A Safety Alert is a campus-wide warning intended to provide members of the University community with timely information about certain serious crimes. Safety Alerts are part of the University’s compliance responsibilities to issue timely warnings under the Clery Act, a Federal campus crime disclosure law. Safety Alerts do not contain identifying information about the reporting person. 

SEXUAL ASSAULT RESOURCE COORDINATOR (SARC) TEAM—The University has designated the SARC team to provide immediate assistance and support to any student who has experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, or other sexual misconduct. The SARC on call at the time of the contact may meet with the person, provide information about safety, emotional and physical well-being, on campus and community resources, possible supportive measures, and review the person’s options to address the complaint under this Policy. The SARC team also provides ongoing support and assistance through any University and/or criminal justice review, investigation, or resolution process. The SARC on-call can be reached at 484-343-6028 and is available 24 hours/day. Members of the SARC Team do not act as legal counsel and generally are unable to serve as advisors in University disciplinary proceedings. 

SUPPORTIVE MEASURES—Following a report of sexual misconduct, the University will offer non-disciplinary, nonpunitive individualized services as appropriate and as reasonably available to involved parties. Supportive measures are designed to protect the safety of all parties and the University’s employment and educational environment and/or deter further acts of misconduct. More information about Supportive Measures can be found in Appendix B of the full policy. 

TITLE IX COORDINATOR—The Title IX Coordinator oversees the University’s centralized review, investigation, and resolution process for matters arising under this policy and coordinates the University’s compliance with Title IX. The Title IX Coordinator is a University resource who: 

Can discuss with Complainants and Respondents the availability of supportive measures with or without the filing of a formal complaint; 

Will consider the Complainant’s and Respondent’s wishes with respect to available supportive measures; 

Will explain to the Complainant the process for filing a formal complaint; 

Can explain to the Respondent the process following the filing of a formal complaint. See Appendix C of the full Policy for the complete Title IX Notice. 

TITLE IX INVESTIGATOR—The Title IX Investigator will typically conduct administrative investigations of sexual misconduct reports falling within this policy, unless the Title IX Coordinator designates another trained investigator in light of the circumstances.

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Procedures to Follow if an Incident of Sexual Misconduct Occurs—Accessing University Resources for Help and Support 

Should an incident of sexual misconduct occur, the University has both reporting procedures and support resources in place so that a person experiencing an incident of sexual misconduct does not need to face the effects of such an incident alone. The first concern is for the safety, health, and well-being of those affected. Confidential and non-confidential (yet private) options for support and reporting are available in the Campus and Community Resources, Confidential and Non-Confidential, for Sexual Misconduct resources as set forth in the Villanova University Policies section. The University has also adopted grievance procedures that may be utilized to identify, investigate, adjudicate, and address reports of sexual misconduct. 

The University strongly encourages reporting of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, Department of Public Safety and/or to law enforcement. Students can make these reports with the assistance of a member of the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) team who can provide immediate assistance or support to any student who has experienced sexual misconduct. A member of the SARC team is available 24/7. An individual does not have to decide whether or not to request any specific action by the University at the time the report is made, nor is there a time limit on reporting. Villanova is committed to supporting the rights of a person reporting an incident of sexual misconduct to make an informed choice among options and services available both on and off campus. 

Medical Attention and Preservation of Evidence 

When an incident of sexual assault or other sexual misconduct is reported to a campus resource, a person’s physical well-being should be addressed as soon as possible, whether or not the person wishes to make a formal report to Public Safety or law enforcement. A medical provider can diagnose and treat the full extent of any injury or physical effect. 

The medical exam is also important in order to properly collect and preserve evidence. There is a limited window of time (typically 72 to 96 hours) following an incident of sexual assault to preserve physical and other forms of evidence for proof of a criminal offense and assistance in obtaining a protective order. In the event of a report immediately following an incident of sexual assault, the person is encouraged to not shower, bathe, douche, brush teeth, drink, or change clothing prior to seeking medical treatment. Similarly, any clothing or bedding should remain untouched pending collection by law enforcement. Whether or not a person has chosen how to proceed at the time of the medical examination, taking the step to gather evidence will preserve the full range of options to seek resolution through the pursuit of a criminal investigation or the University’s complaint processes. 

Victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence are encouraged to also preserve evidence by saving: text messages, social media posts, other communications, pictures, logs or other copies of documents. This evidence could be useful to University hearing boards/ investigators or police. The preservation of this type of evidence is important and may assist in obtaining a protection order and/ or proving that a criminal offense, such as dating violence, domestic violence or stalking, has occurred.

Please note that under Pennsylvania law, a medical provider may be required to notify law enforcement of a reported sexual assault under most circumstances. Although the medical provider will provide information to law enforcement, the reporting person may decline to speak with a law enforcement officer or participate in a criminal prosecution. 

Bryn Mawr Hospital offers medical treatment and collection of evidence. In Pennsylvania, evidence may be collected even if the individual chooses not to make a report to law enforcement.

Campus and Community Resources, Confidential and Non-Confidential, for Sexual Misconduct 

ON-CAMPUS RESOURCES: Please note that “confidential” sources will generally not provide information to Public Safety or law enforcement, but will encourage the reporting person to contact Public Safety to report the incident and pursue an investigation.

Table of On-Campus Resources

Resource

Contact

Role

Office Location

Confidential*

Availability

TITLE IX COORDINATOR +

Ms. Ryan Rost+

610-519-8805

Email Ryan Rost

Accepts reports. Coordinates supportive measures. Liaison to Public Safety, SARC, and/or RRC

Oversees Title IX Compliance

204 Tolentine Hall

NO

Normal business hours (Monday-Friday 9 am−5 pm)

PUBLIC SAFETY

David Tedjeske,

Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police

Kim Carter, Title IX

Investigator & Deputy Title

IX Coordinator

610-519-4444 Emergency

610-519-5800

Email Dave Tedjeske

Non-Emergency

484-343-6926

Email Kim Carter

Accepts reports; Conducts criminal and/or administrative investigations; Serves as liaison with other law enforcement agencies

Garey Hall (intersection of County Line Road and Spring Mill Road)

NO

24/7

SEXUAL ASSAULT RESOURCE COORDINATOR(S)** [SARC]

484-343-6028

Email SARC

Provides information about options and resources; Coordinates accommodations

Various

NO – name of reporting person may not need to be shared if requested —see section IV B of policy, also below ***

24/7

RESPONDENT RESOURCE COORDINATOR(S)

[RRC]

610-519-8807

Email RRC

Provides information on resources for respondents; Coordinates accommodations

Various

NO

Normal business hours

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER

610-519-4070

Provides medical care;

Testing for sexually transmitted

infections, pregnancy, and predatory drugs, such as GHB, Rohypnol and Ketamine, is available;

Collection of evidence is not available and may be obtained at the local hospitals listed in the Off-Campus Community Resources

Health Services

Building, 3rd floor

NO—name of reporting person may not need to be shared if requested -, see section IV B of policy, also below ***

NOT Confidential if treated by a physician, who is required by law to report sexual violence to the local police authorities

24/7 when classes are in session; 8 a.m.–4 p.m. at other times

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER

610-519-4050

Provides counseling

Health Services Building, 2nd floor

YES

Normal business hours and after hours—contact Student Health Center

RESIDENCE LIFE/ RESIDENT ASSISTANTS

Professional Staff Members

610-519-4154 or RAs located in each residence hall

Provides support & assists with reporting

Serves as liaison with Public Safety, SARC, and/or RRC

Stanford Hall, Ground Floor

NO

24/7 (through RA and professional on-call)

CAMPUS MINISTRY

610-519-3546

Provides support

St. Rita’s Hall, 1st floor

YES—if reporting to a priest in his capacity as pastoral counselor

NO—if reporting to employees who are not priests

Normal business hours

CLERGY MEMBERS

Fr. Rob Hagan

610-519-6485 (office)

610-308-4422 (cell)

Email Fr. Rob Hagan

Provides support

Various

YES

if in capacity as pastoral counselor

24/7

DEAN OF STUDENTS

Tom DeMarco, Dean of Students & Assistant Vice President for Residence Life

Nicholas Tumolo,

Assistant Dean of Students

610-519-4200

Email Tom DeMarco

Email Nicholas Tumulo

Adjudicates complaints;

Provides information concerning Code of Student Conduct Procedures Coordinates accommodations

213 Dougherty Hall

NO

Normal business hours

HEALTH PROMOTION Stacy Andes, Director

610-519-7409

Email Stacy Andes

Facilitates prevention initiatives and oversees SARC team

Health Services Building, 1st floor

NO, unless acting in her capacity on the SARC team***

Normal business hours

HUMAN RESOURCES

Raymond Duffy

Associate Vice President and Affirmative Action Officer

Albert Baladez,

Director, Employee Relations and Compliance and Deputy Title IX Coordinator

610-519-4237

Email Raymond Duffy

610-519-4238

Email Albert Baladez

Accepts reports

Accepts reports; Provides information about options and resources; Conducts employment discrimination investigation

789 Lancaster Avenue

NO

Normal business hours

STUDENT LIFE

Rev. John P. Stack, OSA,

Vice President

Kathy Byrnes,

Associate Vice President for Student Life & Deputy Title IX Coordinator

610-519-4550

Email Father Stack

Email Kathy Byrnes

Provides support

Accepts reports; Provides information about options and resources

202 Dougherty Hall

NO

Normal business hours

ATHLETICS

Lynn Tighe

Senior Associate Athletic Director for Administration & Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics

610-519-4121

Email Lynn Tighe

Accepts reports; Provides information about options and resources

Field House

NO

Normal business hours

OFFICE OF EDUCATION ABROAD

Liz Campanella, Director

610-519-5443

Email Liz Campanella

Provides support; Provides information about options and resources; Coordinates accommodations

Garey Hall

NO

Normal business hours

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

610-519-4010

Email Financial Assistance

Provides information about financial assistance

Kennedy Hall, Second Floor

NO

Normal business hours

VISA AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES

610-519-4095

Email Steve McWilliams

Provides support to international students

Connelly Center, 2nd Floor

NO

Normal business hours

HEALTH ADVOCATE (employee assistance program through Human Resources)

866-799-2728

or

Health Advocate website for Villanova Employees

Provides information about resources and counseling for employees

N/A

YES

24/7

ANONYMOUS REPORTING HOTLINE (EthicsPoint)

1-855-236-1443 or Ethics Point Hotline

Accepts reports

N/A

YES, if reporter so desires

24/7

*Confidential means the person will not report the incident to Public Safety or the Title IX Coordinator except, in some cases, as an incident without identifying information (to comply with Clery reporting requirements on crime statistics). Other resources are private, meaning the report and names may be shared but only with University employees who are involved in the investigation or resolution of such incidents or as required by law. 

** Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) The University has designated the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator team to provide immediate assistance to any student who has experienced sexual misconduct. The Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator on call at the time of the contact may meet with the person, provide information about safety, emotional and physical well-being, on cam-pus and community resources, possible supportive measures, and review the person’s options to address the complaint under this Policy. The Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator team also provides ongoing support and assistance through any University and/or criminal justice review, investigation, or resolution process. The University’s Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator on call can be reached at 484-343-6028 and is available 24 hours/day. Members of the SARC Team do not act as legal counsel and generally are unable to serve as advisors in University disciplinary proceedings. 

*** Excerpt from Policy (IV B) on confidentiality of reports to the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) 

2. Nurses and Nurse Practitioners at the Student Health Center and the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) team. The University has designated these employees to provide immediate assistance and support to any person wishing to make a report of sexual misconduct. These people are considered responsible employees and are required to share disclosures of sexual misconduct with the Title IX Coordinator, but generally only report that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information about the person, if requested by the reporting person. These reports to the Title IX Coordinator will include the name of the Respondent (if shared), general nature of the incident, date, time of day, and location, as well as other information needed to assess whether an on-going threat is present in order to evaluate whether a timely warning should be issued. 

+ Title IX Coordinator The University has appointed Ms. Ryan Rost as its Title IX Coordinator. The Title IX Coordinator oversees the University's centralized review, investigation, and resolution process for matters arising under this Policy and coordinates the University’s compliance with Title IX. The Title IX Coordinator is a University resource who: can discuss with Complainants and Respondents the availability of supportive measures with or without the filing of a formal complaint; will consider the Complainant and Respondent’s wishes with respect to available supportive measures; will explain to the Complainant the process for filing a formal complaint; and can explain to the Respondent the process following the filing of a formal complaint. See Appendix C of the full Policy for the complete Title IX Notice.

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OFF-CAMPUS COMMUNITY RESOURCES

Table of Off-Campus Community Resources

Resource

Phone Contact

Confidentiality?

LAW ENFORCEMENT

Radnor Township

Lower Merion Township

Conshohocken Borough

Upper Merion Township

Tredyffrin Township

911

610-688-0503

610-649-1000

610-828-4032/4033

610-265-3232

610-647-1440

NO

LOCAL HOSPITALS

(medical treatment and collection of evi­dence available; testing for predatory drugs may not be available but is available at the Student Health Center)

Bryn Mawr Hospital Lankenau Medical Center

Paoli Memorial Hospital

484-337-3000

484-476-2000

484-565-1000

NO

Under Pennsylvania law, a hospital medical provider is required to notify law enforcement of a reported sexual as­sault. The Complainant may decline to speak with a law enforcement officer or participate in a criminal prosecution.

PHILADELPHIA SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE CENTER 24/7 (support, medical treatment, and collection of evidence available)

100 E. Lehigh Street Philadelphia, PA 19125

215-425-1625

YES

DELAWARE COUNTY WOMEN AGAINST RAPE

24 Hour HOTLINE (24/7)

610-566-4342

610-566-4342

YES

YES

DOMESTIC ABUSE PROJECT OF DELAWARE COUNTY

24 Hour HOTLINE (24/7)

610-565-6272

610-565-4590

YES

DELAWARE COUNTY OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY

610-891-4162

NO

COMMUNITY LEGAL SERVICES OF PHILADELPHIA

215-981-3700

YES

DELAWARE COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION

610-566-6627

NO

FEDERAL STUDENT AID INFORMATION CENTER

FAFSA website

1-800-433-3243 

NO

VISA SERVICES

US Department of State 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES OF PHILADELPHIA— IMMIGRATION SERVICES 

222 North 17th Street 3rd Floor

Philadelphia, PA 19103

267-331-2490

NO

YES, if legal services provided

Procedures the University Will Follow When Sexual Misconduct is Reported 

The University has procedures in place that serve to be sensitive to those who report sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including informing people about their right to file criminal charges as well as the availability of counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and immigration assistance and other services on and/or off campus as well as additional remedies to prevent contact between a Complainant and a Respondent, such as in the areas of housing, academic, protective orders, transportation and working accommodations, if reasonably available. The University will make such accommodations, if the Complainant requests them and if they are reasonably available, regardless of whether the person chooses to report the crime to law enforcement. Students and employees should contact the Title IX Coordinator, Title IX Investigator and/or the SARC team. 

Confidential Counseling and Support 

Students or employees wishing to obtain confidential assistance or access to campus resources without making a report to the University may do so by speaking with professionals who are obligated by law to maintain confidentiality. These professionals are: counselors in the University Counseling Center, members of the clergy who are serving as Pastoral Counselors, or representatives of the Employee Assistance Program. See Campus and Community Resources, Confidential and Non-Confidential, for Sexual Misconduct chart for contact information. Nurses and Nurse Practitioners at the Student Health Center and members of the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator team may talk with an individual privately and generally only report that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information about the reporting person. 

Please note that the University also has a Faculty Ombuds who, except in certain required instances such as immediate threat of serious harm, will not report instances of sexual misconduct. 

Reports made to other employees must be shared with the Title IX Coordinator, which may prompt an investigation by the Department of Public Safety and steps by the University to address the safety and security of the University community. See the Sexual Misconduct Policy for additional information about confidentiality.

Making a Report 

A person may report an incident of sexual misconduct to law enforcement, the Department of Public Safety and/or the Title IX Coordinator. See Campus and Community Resources, Confidential and Non-Confidential, for Sexual Misconduct charts for contact information. University personnel will assist the reporting person in notifying those authorities upon the person’s request. A complaint may be pursued through the criminal process or through the University disciplinary process consecutively or concurrently. 

The victim may also decline to notify law enforcement as well as campus authorities. 

When a student or employee reports to the University that they have experienced sexual misconduct, whether the incident occurred on or off campus, the University will provide the student or employee a written explanation of their rights and options. When an incident of sexual misconduct is reported to a campus authority, the University may designate an investigator of its choosing. 

Administrative investigations of all sexual misconduct involving a current student: The Title IX Investigator or their designee will typically oversee the administrative investigation of all sexual misconduct reports where the Respondent is a current student. 

Administrative investigations of sexual misconduct involving a University employee: Human Resources and/or the Title IX Investigator or their designee will typically oversee the investigation of all reports of sexual misconduct involving a Respondent who is a University employee (faculty or staff). 

Criminal investigations: The Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police or their designee oversees the criminal investigation of all sexual misconduct reports conducted by the Department, regardless of the Respondent’s affiliation with the University. 

For administrative (non-criminal) investigations, the University will provide to a party whose participation is invited or expected, written notice of the date, time, location, known participants and purpose of all hearings, investigative interviews, or other meetings, with sufficient time for that party to prepare to participate. 

Normally, investigations will include interviewing the parties, interviewing witnesses as appropriate, and collecting relevant documentary, electronic, or other evidence. Students, faculty and staff deemed relevant to the matter may be asked to participate in an investigation, and when asked, they are expected to find time to meet and share information with the investigator. A criminal investigation may also include the collection of physical and/or forensic evidence which could be shared with the administrative investigator and included in the Investigative Report. 

Prior to the conclusion of the administrative investigation, the parties will have an equal opportunity to inspect and review the evidence obtained through the investigation, and will have the opportunity to meaningfully respond to the evidence. The parties will have ten (10) business days to inspect and review the evidence and submit a written response by email to the investigator. The investigator will consider the parties’ written responses before completing an Investigative Report that fairly summarizes the relevant evidence. The investigator will provide the parties access to the Investigative Report at least ten (10) business days prior to any hearing for each party’s review and written response. The investigator will share all evidence submitted during the investigation, the Investigative Report, and any responses, with the University authorities empowered to act on violations of University policy. 

Following a report of sexual misconduct, the University will offer non-disciplinary, non-punitive individualized services as appropriate and as reasonably available to involved parties. Supportive measures are designed to: 

  • protect the safety of all parties and the University’s employment and educational environment and/or deter further acts of misconduct 
  • restore or preserve equal access to Villanova’s education program or activity without unreasonably burdening the other party, including via measures designed to protect the safety of all parties or Villanova’s educational environment, and/or deter sexual misconduct 

These supportive measures are available regardless of whether the Complainant chooses to file a formal complaint with the University or report to the police department with jurisdiction. 

Community members seeking such assistance should speak with the Title IX Coordinator, Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) on call, the Assistant Dean of Students, or a Deputy Title IX Coordinator. 

The University will maintain consistent contact with the parties to ensure that all safety, emotional, and physical well-being concerns are being addressed. The University will determine the necessity and scope of any supportive measures pending the completion of the grievance process. Even when a Complainant or Respondent does specifically request that protective action be taken, the University may still choose to impose measures at its discretion to ensure the safety of any person, the broader University community, or the integrity of the review process, or for any other lawful reason. The University will maintain private any supportive measures taken to the extent maintaining such privacy would not impair the ability to provide the measures. 

All community members are encouraged to report concerns about failure of another person to abide by any restrictions imposed by a supportive measure. The University will take prompt responsive action to enforce a previously implemented supportive measure. 

The University may impose (and a person may request) supportive measures that can be tailored to achieve the goals of this policy, even if not specifically listed here. The range of supportive measures includes, but is not limited to: 

  1. NO CONTACT ORDER—The Complainant or Respondent may request, or the University may impose, communication and contact restrictions to prevent further potentially harmful interaction. These communication and contact restrictions generally preclude in person, telephone, electronic or third-party communications. A person may also seek a protection/anti-harassment order from the local court of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This is a civil proceeding independent of the University. If a court order is issued the University will, to the extent possible, assist the protected person in benefiting from the restrictions imposed by the court and will also facilitate on-campus compliance with the order. 
  2. ESCORT—The University may provide an escort to involved parties to ensure safe movement between classes and activities. 
  3. ACADEMIC, EMPLOYMENT, LIVING, OR TRANSPORTATION ARRANGEMENTS—Complainants and Respondents may request reasonable changes in their own academic, employment, living or transportation arrangements after a report of sexual misconduct by speaking with the Title IX Coordinator, a Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator, a Respondent Resource Coordinator, the Assistant Dean of Students, or a Deputy Title IX Coordinator. Upon request, the University will inform the Complainant or Respondent of the options and will accommodate the request if those changes are reasonably available. In some instances, the University may initiate these changes without a request. These may include a change in class or work schedule, a change in living accommodations, academic accommodations, and/or a voluntary leave of absence. 
  4. EMOTIONAL SUPPORT—The University will assist in providing counseling services through the University Counseling Center (for students), Health Advocate (for employees), or will assist in providing a referral to off-campus support agencies. 
  5. EMERGENCY REMOVAL—To provide for the safety of any person or the broader campus community, or for any other lawful purpose, the University may remove a Respondent from a Villanova education program or activity on an emergency basis. The University will undertake an individualized safety and risk analysis to determine whether an immediate threat to the physical health or safety of any community member or other individual arising from the allegation of sexual misconduct justifies the removal. The University will provide the Respondent with notice and an opportunity to challenge the decision immediately following the decision. 

Further, Villanova University complies with Pennsylvania law in recognizing orders of protection. Any person who obtains an order of protection from Pennsylvania or any reciprocal state should provide a copy to the Department of Public Safety and the Title IX Coordinator. A Complainant may then meet with Public Safety to develop a safety action plan, which is a plan for Public Safety and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or coming and going from campus. This plan may include, but is not limited to: escorts, special parking arrangements, or changing classroom location, etc. The University cannot apply for a legal order of protection, no contact order or restraining order for a victim from the applicable jurisdiction(s). All accommodations or protective measures will be maintained as private to the extent that maintaining such privacy would not impair the ability of the University to provide them. Villanova University will complete publicly available record-keeping for purposes of Clery Act reporting and disclosures will be made without inclusion of identifying information about the victim, as defined in 42 USC 1395 (a) (20).

Special Procedures for Sexual Misconduct Proceedings 

Villanova University’s special procedures for sexual misconduct proceedings involving students (non-law), law students, faculty and staff are set forth in more detail as outlined in the linked documents below:

Table of Special Procedures for Sexual Misconduct Proceedings

Role of Respondent

Area Overseeing Proceedings

Link to Special Procedures

Students (non-Law)

Dean of Students Office

Special Procedures Governing Sexual Misconduct Proceedings

Law Students

Vice Dean or designee

Law Student Special Procedures Governing Sexual Misconduct Proceedings

Staff Members

Human Resources

Staff Special Procedures Governing Sexual Misconduct Proceedings

Faculty Members and

Faculty Administrators

Human Resources in coordination

with Provost’s Office

Faculty Special Procedures Governing Sexual Misconduct Proceedings

These procedures are consistent with Title IX regulations for addressing claims of sexual misconduct and are designed to provide for a prompt, fair and impartial response, from the initial investigation to the final result, for the resolution of such complaints and remedies for the reporting person in the event an incident of sexual misconduct is determined to have occurred. 

The individual making the report is referred to in these Special Procedures as the Reporter. The individual who is alleged to have been subjected to sexual misconduct is referred to as the Complainant. A Respondent refers to the person reported to be the perpetrator of conduct that could constitute sexual misconduct under the Sexual Misconduct Policy. 

When the Title IX Coordinator receives a report of sexual misconduct, they will contact the Complainant to discuss the availability of supportive measures with or without the filing of a formal complaint and explain the process for filing a formal complaint. A formal complaint can be filed by the Complainant in person, mail, email or through other reporting means, but must include a signed (physical or digital signature) written description of the facts alleged and request that the University investigate the matter. In certain circumstances where a Complainant does not wish to file a formal complaint, one may be filed by the Title IX Coordinator to address the safety of the broader educational community. In such cases, the University will inform the Complainant and will share the University’s reasoning for needing to file a Formal Complaint. As in all cases, the University will only share information with those needing to know in order to conduct the needed investigation and University’s response to the report of sexual misconduct.

Whether a report results in a full investigation or not, the University will remain ever mindful of the well-being of those involved and take ongoing steps to prevent retaliation. The University will take action to assist those involved consistent with their wishes. A variety of supportive measures are available to those involved as outlined in Appendix B of the Sexual Misconduct Policy. 

The time frame for resolution begins with the filing of a Formal Complaint. Generally speaking, the University will complete the administrative investigation and resolution of all reports within a reasonably prompt manner, and no longer than ninety (90) business days after the filing of the Formal Complaint. 

Periodic updates as to the status of the review or investigation may be provided to both the Complainant and Respondent. Each case is unique, and the process for handling the matter will be impacted by factors such as the complexity of the investigation, the scope of the allegation, the parties’ schedules and availability, the academic calendar and any concurrent criminal investigation. 

If a formal complaint is filed, an investigation by a trained investigator will commence and the parties will be provided with options for informal and formal resolution as outlined below. Once the investigation is complete, the Complainant, Respondent and their Advisors will have the opportunity to review relevant documentation related to the investigation. After review, the matter may be referred to the appropriate University official (“Official”) in the areas as outlined above. 

The Official will review the complaint and investigation and determine whether or not, if proven, the allegations would constitute a violation of the University’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. If so, the Complainant will meet with the Official or their designee to review the complaint and to discuss the procedures available to them. This meeting will take place promptly after the matter has been referred to the Official. If not, the procedures for University dismissal of Formal Complaints and appeals for such dismissals are outlined in Section IV E of the Sexual Misconduct Policy. 

The individual Complainant will normally have five (5) business days after this meeting to decide whether or not to request the University to pursue the matter under the University’s Special Procedures (which also constitutes the University’s Title IX and Sexual Misconduct grievance procedures); however, this time frame may be relaxed in recognition of the unique and complicated dynamics that often confront an individual following an incident of sexual misconduct. The University will provide the individual with resources and information to assist in making an informed and supported choice as to how to proceed. In the event an individual chooses not to pursue resolution of a complaint under these procedures, the University will continue to provide appropriate supportive measures to the parties. 

Generally speaking, the University will complete a resolution process involving alleged sexual misconduct in a prompt and timely fashion. All time periods for hearings may be extended by the University in its sole discretion based on the complexity of the case, the seriousness of the offense or other extenuating circumstances. 

If the Complainant and/or the Respondent intend to have their advisor (as defined below) accompany them to any meetings with the Conduct Review Officer, they must provide the name and contact information of the advisor to the Conduct Review Officer at least three (3) business days prior to the initial meeting. If the same advisor accompanies the party to subsequent meetings, additional notification is not required.

Rights of the Respondent 

1. The right to choose whether or not to participate in the grievance procedures, with the understanding that findings and sanctions may be imposed with or without such participation; 

2. The right to notice of the allegation that a violation of the Code has taken place; 

3. The right to notification of the grievance procedures; 

4. The right to review all evidence and the investigative report; 

5. The right to a prompt and impartial response and resolution of complaints; 

6. The right to be presumed not responsible until found otherwise; 

7. The right to have the University bear the burden of proof by a preponderance of the evidence; 

8. The right to present relevant statements, materials and witnesses during grievance procedures; 

9. The right to have an advisor of choice throughout the process or appointed by the University for a hearing; 

10.The right to have available at the hearing all relevant evidence and the investigative report; 

11. The right to have an advisor ask questions of any witnesses and/or the Complainant at designated times during the hearing; 

12. The right to written notification of: 

a. any finding of responsibility 

b. findings of fact supporting the determination 

c. statement of and rationale for the result as to each allegation 

d. any disciplinary sanctions imposed 

e. any remedies provided to the Complainant 

13. The right to be free from retaliation regardless of participation in the University’s grievance process; and 

14. The right of appeal consistent with these Special Procedures.

Rights of the Complainant 

1. The right to choose whether or not to participate in grievance procedures; 

2. The right to notification of the grievance procedures; 

3. The right to review all evidence and the investigative report; 

4. The right to a prompt and impartial response and resolution of the complaint; 

5. The right to present relevant statements, materials and witnesses during the grievance procedures; 

6. The right to have an advisor of choice throughout the process or appointed by the University for a hearing; 

7. The right to have available at the hearing all relevant evidence and the investigative report; 

8. The right to have an advisor ask questions of any witnesses and/or the Respondent at designated times during a hearing; 

9. The right to written notification of: 

a. any finding of responsibility 

b. findings of fact supporting the determination 

c. statement of and rationale for the result as to each allegation 

d. any disciplinary sanctions imposed 

e. any remedies provided 

10. The right to be free from retaliation for filing a complaint or participating in the University’s grievance process; and 

11. The right of appeal consistent with the provisions of these Special Procedures.

Informal Resolution Process 

At any time after the filing of a formal complaint, either the Complainant or the Respondent may request informal resolution in lieu of formal resolution. Informal resolution is not permitted to resolve a complaint from a student against an employee. 

All requests for informal resolution must be in writing to the Title IX Coordinator. The parties are not required to attempt informal resolution, and informal resolution is not appropriate for all types of alleged conduct. The University shall determine if the matter is eligible for informal resolution. 

If the University has determined the matter is eligible for informal resolution and both parties consent to the process in writing, the matter will be referred to the appropriate University official or third-party engaged by the University to facilitate the process. Both parties may consult with an Advisor before and during the informal resolution process, and the Advisor may accompany the Complainant or Respondent to any meetings in connection with the process. Any agreed upon resolution reached by the parties is subject to the University’s final approval. This includes any resolution reached by the parties without the University’s active participation or involvement. 

At any time, either party may elect to discontinue the informal resolution process by providing written notice to the designated University official. The University reserves the right to discontinue the informal resolution process: if information becomes available which makes the matter ineligible for informal resolution; if there are health or safety concerns that have not been adequately addressed; if an acceptable resolution cannot be reached between the parties; or under other appropriate circumstances. 

Once the informal resolution reaches an agreed-upon conclusion, which must be approved by the University and acknowledged by the parties in writing, the matter will be considered resolved and not eligible for further informal or disciplinary resolution. The informal resolution is not subject to appeal. Alleged violations of the terms of the resolution, retaliation, or other violations will be considered a new and separate matter and will not reopen the original matter.

Formal Resolution 

Formal resolution of alleged violations of the Sexual Misconduct Policy will occur by acceptance of responsibility or by a hearing. 

A. ACCEPTANCE OF RESPONSIBILITY 

If the facts of the case are not in dispute a Respondent has the option to accept responsibility. Following the acceptance of responsibility, the appropriate University official will impose sanctions (students), corrective action (staff) or disciplinary action (faculty) (“Sanctions”). Acceptance of responsibility may be rejected by the Official. The Official will provide all parties written notice of the sanction(s) imposed. Acceptance of responsibility does not waive the right to appeal as outlined below. 

B. HEARING BOARD 

Hearings are designed to determine responsibility for alleged violations. As such, the hearing procedures are governed by University policies consistent with federal and state law. 

i. Notice and Participation 

The Official will inform the Complainant and Respondent of the hearing procedures, date and time. The Complainant and Respondent are expected to cooperate fully with the Hearing Board during the hearing. If either party fails to appear at a scheduled hearing, the proceedings may continue without them. 

ii. Consolidation Options 

In Board hearings involving more than one Respondent, the Official, in consultation with appropriate University officials, may permit the hearing concerning each person to be conducted either separately or jointly. In situations involving multiple complaints pending against the same Respondent arising out of the same facts or circumstances, the University has discretion to consolidate complaints in situations that arise out of those same facts or circumstances. The University also has discretion, but not the obligation, to solicit and consider the input of the parties regarding the consolidation of hearings. If, during the course of the hearing, further violations of University policy become apparent, the Hearing Board may recommend that such alleged violations be considered as a separate case. 

iii. Composition of the Board 

A Hearing (Board) is generally composed of a chair of the Board, who is normally an attorney (Chair) and three trained faculty/staff members (see links to Special Procedures above which include separate details regarding Board composition depending on the role of the Respondent). All members of the Board shall be impartial with no conflict of interest between the Board member and any party. All members of the Board shall receive appropriate training prior to serving on the Board of any case involving such allegations. The Complainant and/or the Respondent may challenge the composition of the Board if they believe that a conflict of interest exists with a Board member. The party making this challenge must submit a written request to the Official with specific and verifiable documentation. All objections must be raised within five (5) business days of receiving notification of the composition of the Board. The Official will make the determination whether to replace the Board member. The Complainant and Respondent may not contact members of the Board, or have third parties contact the Board, prior to the convening of the Board. 

iv. Hearing Procedures 

The Chair shall actively participate in the hearing, ask questions, run the hearing, advise the Board on procedural and legal issues and draft the determinations reached by a majority of the Board. The Chair may or may not be an employee of the University and shall be a non-voting member of the Board. The Official, as assigned by the appropriate area, will facilitate the administrative needs of the Board and will be present during the hearing to provide assistance to the Board. All hearings shall be held in appropriate facilities designated by the Official and shall be private. The Official can provide for the hearing to occur virtually with technology that enables the parties to appear remotely from separate locations. A transcript of the hearing will be made available to the parties to inspect or review upon request. Disruptive, threatening, intimidating, or uncivil behavior will not be tolerated. Violations will normally result in a warning being issued by the Chair, or the Official. Repeated violations may result in offending party being asked to leave the hearing. 

v. Advisors 

A Complainant, and/or a Respondent participating in a hearing must be accompanied by an Advisor. This can be an advisor of their choosing or, if needed, a University-appointed advisor. The Advisor may include legal counsel. If the party’s Advisor of choice is different from the advisor attending previous meetings with the Official, the party must inform the Official. This notification must be in writing, a minimum of five (5) business days in advance of the hearing and include the name and contact information for the advisor. The Advisor may provide support, guidance or advice to the involved party before and during the proceeding. The advisor will not offer testimonial evidence or answer questions on behalf of their Advisee; the advisor may not ask questions of their advisee; and the Advisor may not present opening or closing remarks. At designated times during the hearing, the Advisor may only ask questions of the other party and witnesses in compliance with the Board’s procedures and the University’s policies and procedures. If a witness who is called to appear at a hearing refuses to submit to questioning, the Board will not rely on any statement of that witness in reaching a determination regarding responsibility. 

vi. Presentation of Evidence at the Hearing 

The Complainant and the Respondent, may present: 

opening and closing statements concerning the alleged violation(s); 

relevant documentation gathered during the investigatory process; 

relevant witnesses identified during the investigatory process.

The Board may consider written statements obtained during the investigatory process provided that the witness submits to questioning during the hearing. The Respondent and the Complainant and their advisors may review all evidence and the investigative report provided to the Board prior to the commencement of the hearing and have all evidence and the investigative report available to them during the hearing. 

Formal rules of evidence shall not apply. In the Chair’s discretion, evidence, shall be permitted if it is relevant, reliable, not unduly repetitious, and it is the sort of information on which responsible persons are accustomed to rely in the conduct of serious affairs. 

During the hearing, the parties and witnesses will provide information to and answer questions from the Board. Except for questioning by the advisor, the Respondent, the Complainant, the advisors and the witnesses will direct their comments and/or questions only to the Board. Before any questions are answered, the Chair will determine if the question is relevant. Questions that are determined to be irrelevant and/or duplicative of those already asked may be disallowed. 

In general, the following types of evidence and questions are not relevant:

Evidence and questions about the Complainant’s sexual predisposition or prior sexual behavior unless:

Such questions and evidence are offered to prove that someone other than the Respondent committed the conduct alleged by the Complainant, or 

The questions and evidence concern specific incidents of the Complainant’s prior sexual behavior with respect to the Respondent and are offered to prove consent. 

Evidence and questions that constitute, or seek disclosure of, information protected under a legallyrecognized privilege. 

Any party’s medical, psychological, and similar records unless the party has given voluntary, written consent. 

In addition, evidence of pattern of similar conduct by Respondent may also be deemed relevant based on the attendant facts and circumstances. Any party seeking admission of prior sexual history and/or evidence of similar conduct, or seeking to challenge such evidence, must do so in writing: by advising the investigator during the investigatory process; and/or by advising the Official in advance of the hearing. The written notice shall set forth the evidence the party is seeking to introduce and the relevancy of such information. 

The Chair will make the determination as to the admissibility of this information or questions and will instruct all parties accordingly regarding any limit in scope or admissibility. 

vii. Closing Statements and Deliberations 

After all statements and materials have been presented, the Complainant and the Respondent and/or their respective advisors may present final comments to the Board. Subsequently and in private, the Board will promptly determine by a preponderance of the evidence whether the Respondent has violated the Sexual Misconduct Policy. The Board’s determination shall be by majority vote. 

viii. Determination Regarding Responsibility 

The Official will simultaneously provide the written Determination Regarding Responsibility to all parties. The Determination will include: 

1. Alleged violations of the Sexual Misconduct Policy; 

2. A description of the procedural steps taken from the filing of the formal complaint; 

3. Findings of fact supporting the determination; 

4. Conclusions regarding which policy(ies), if any, the Respondent has or has not violated. 

5. For each alleged violation: 

a. A statement of, and rationale for, a determination regarding responsibility; 

b. A statement of, and rationale for, any disciplinary sanctions imposed on the Respondent; and 

c. A statement of, and rationale for, whether remedies designed to restore or preserve equal access Villanova’s education program or activity will be provided by the University to the Complainant; and 

Procedures and the permitted reasons for the parties to appeal as outlined below. 

Appropriate documentation will be maintained as required to allow the University to comply with applicable law.

SANCTIONS 

After the finding or admission of responsibility, the appropriate University Official will impose sanctions after considering the following: 

  1. The nature of the violation and the circumstances surrounding it, including the actual or potential impact on the individuals involved and/or the community as a whole; 
  2. Statements made or evidence presented in the investigative report and/or hearing 
  3. Prior disciplinary record of the Respondent;
  4. Disciplinary precedent; 
  5. Students (non-Law) only—Guidelines in the Code of Student Conduct. The University official imposing sanctions may consult with other University officials as they deem appropriate. 

STUDENT (NON-LAW) SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT 

Non-Reportable Disciplinary Sanctions 

The following non-reportable disciplinary sanctions provide notice to a student that their conduct is in violation of University policies, and therefore unacceptable. Continuation of similar conduct or future violations will result in more severe sanctions, which may impact a student’s disciplinary standing at the University. Non-reportable disciplinary sanctions are not disclosed to external third-parties, except when required by law. 

  • Conduct Notice 
  • Conduct Warning 
  • Probationary Warning

Reportable Disciplinary Sanctions 

The following reportable disciplinary sanctions typically are the outcome of serious or repeated violations of the Code of Student Conduct. These sanctions impact a student’s disciplinary standing at the University, as well as impose other restrictions and/or conditions of membership. Reportable disciplinary sanctions are disclosed to authorized external third-parties for a stated period of time, in accordance with the Student Conduct and Concern Records Policy. Typically, family/ legal guardian(s) are notified when a student is issued a reportable sanction. 

  • Disciplinary Probation 
  • Disciplinary Probation with Loss of Privilege 
  • Suspension 
  • Expulsion 

Housing Sanctions 

  • Housing Status Advisory 
  • Housing Probation 
  • Loss of Campus Residency 
  • Additional Housing Measures 

Additional Disciplinary Measures 

  • Fines 
  • Exclusion from University Property, University Buildings, University Events or Programs, Student Organizations, Intramural or Club Sports, and/or Extracurricular Activities for a stated period of time. 
  • Community Service 
  • Family/Legal Guardian Notification 
  • Dean of Students Hold on Records 
  • Educational Measures 
  • No Contact Directive 
  • Withholding a Degree 
  • Other Administrative Measures, as appropriate

LAW STUDENT SANCTIONS FOR VIOLATIONS OF POLICY 

  • Exclusion from the Law School 
  • Suspension from the Law School 
  • Reprimand to be included in the student’s Law School academic file and/or noted on the student’s transcript 
  • Reprimand not included in the student’s Law School academic file and not noted on the student’s transcript 
  • Suspension or denial of specified Law School or University privileges or offices 
  • Appropriate compulsory service to the Law School community or outside community 
  • Counseling or other treatment as appropriate 
  • Other Administrative Measures, as appropriate 

FACULTY DISCIPLINARY ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF POLICY 

  • Letter of Reprimand/Warning 
  • Restrictions on Work, such as no thesis advising, no offcampus travel with students, no independent studies 
  • Restrictions on Communication, such as no email or other contacts with the complainant 
  • Rescinding Awards 
  • Suspension with Pay 
  • Suspension without Pay 
  • Dismissal 
  • Other Administrative Measures, as appropriate 

STAFF CORRECTIVE ACTION FOR VIOLATIONS OF POLICY 

  • Other Administrative Measures, as appropriate 
  • Verbal warning; 
  • Written warning; 
  • Completion of mandatory conditions; 
  • Suspension without pay; 
  • Nonrenewal or non-reappointment; 
  • Loss of rank or position; 
  • Activity termination; 
  • Demotion in rank or pay; 
  • Termination of employment; 
  • Ban on University re-employment. 

Sanctions may be escalated depending on severity of the situation and/or imposed in combination with one another. 

APPEALS 

The appropriate University official (see links to Special Procedures above which include separate details regarding University officials who hear appeals depending on the role of the Respondent) will review appeals for a new hearing or a review of sanction. This person may consult with other University officials as they deem appropriate. All decisions made by the person reviewing the appeal are final, including whether or not an appeal is procedurally permitted. 

During the appeal process Respondents may be subject to certain restrictions. 

GROUNDS FOR APPEAL 

The Respondent and the Complainant may request an appeal based only on one or more of the following grounds:

APPEAL FOR A NEW HEARING: 

  1. Procedural Irregularity—A material procedural defect in the original hearing that affected the outcome; 
  2. New Evidence—New material evidence that was not available, through no fault of the appealing party, at the time of the original hearing that could have affected the outcome; or 
  3. Conflict of Interest or Bias—The Title IX Coordinator, investigator(s), or decision-maker(s) had a conflict of interest or bias for or against an individual party, or for or against complainants or respondents in general, that affected the outcome. 

APPEAL FOR REVIEW OF SANCTION: 

The parties may appeal that that sanction imposed were disproportionate to the violation. 

PROCESS TO APPEAL 

The Respondent and the Complainant may request an appeal within five (5) business days from the time of notification of determination. 

Appeals must be submitted to the University official as outlined in the Special Procedures in writing and: 

  • Be from and signed by the Complainant and/or Respondent; 
  • Consist of a concise and complete statement no more than eight (8) single spaced pages (including attachments) utilizing 12-point font; 
  • Set forth the grounds for appeal. 

If the Appeal is not based on appropriate grounds, it will be denied. If the appeal is based on appropriate grounds, the University official will notify both parties of the filing of the appeal. Each party will be given the opportunity to review and respond, in writing, to the other party’s appeal. This response must be submitted within five (5) business days of the filing of an appeal. 

  1. If the appeal is determined to be based on appropriate grounds and alleges a Procedural Irregularity or New Evidence, this appeal will be resolved prior to addressing Appeals for Review of Sanction. The University official will review the appeal promptly and notify the parties of the outcome. 
  2. Subsequent to resolution of Appeals for Procedural Irregularity and New Evidence (if submitted), if the appeal is determined to be based on appropriate grounds for Review of Sanction, the University official will accept as final and binding the previous decision that the Respondent has violated the Sexual Misconduct Policy. Each party will be given the opportunity to separately meet and discuss their appeal and/or their response to the other party’s appeal with the University official. Each party may be accompanied by their advisor. The voluntary meeting will normally be scheduled within ten (10) business days of the original appeal being filed. 

The University official will normally advise the parties of the final results of the grievance process within five (5) business days of the last voluntary meeting.

Sexual Misconduct Prevention Education Efforts 

Villanova University is committed to the prevention of sexual misconduct. Throughout the year, programs and campaigns designed to promote a healthy campus culture and strategies to prevent sexual misconduct are presented by a variety of campus resources including New Student Orientation, Health Promotion, the Title IX Coordinator, peer educators, other Villanova students and Public Safety. These programs include safe and positive options for bystander intervention and risk reduction. The University also promotes participation of student groups in all of its health promotion and prevention efforts through training provided in Residence Life, Athletics, ROTC and the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, among others. Prevention programs stress the added risks involved when the use of alcohol and/or illegal drugs is present. As part of their new student orientation, first year students attend a sexual misconduct prevention program facilitated by trained New Student Orientation Staff members, in conjunction with the Office of Health Promotion and Title IX Coordinator. During this program, new students are encouraged to download the Sexual Assault Villanova University Resource (SAVUR) app. Flyers about sexual misconduct are posted in residence hall bathrooms and other University buildings. The educational programs review strategies for prevention and risk reduction and inform students of options and resources should such an incident occur. The University engages in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end sexual assault, sexual harassment and other sexual misconduct that: 

  • Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and 
  • Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels. 

Educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees and ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns for students and employees that: 

a. Identifies domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking and retaliation as prohibited conduct; 

b. Uses definitions provided by the Department of Education and State law outlining behavior that constitutes domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking and retaliation; 

c. Defines what behavior and actions constitute consent to sexual activity in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and/or using the definition of consent found in the Sexual Misconduct Policy if State law does not define consent; 

d. Provides a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention. Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, sexual harassment, stalking or retaliation. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene;

e. Information on risk reduction. Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that facilitate violence. 

f. Provides an overview of information contained in the Annual Security Report in compliance with the Clery Act.

How to be a Pro-Social Bystander 

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are “individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.” We want to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list of some ways to be a pro-social bystander. If you or someone else is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt. 

  1. Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are okay. 
  2. Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated. 
  3. Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person. 
  4. Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking. 
  5. Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

Risk Reduction 

No person is EVER to blame for experiencing sexual misconduct. These acts not only impact their victims, but also the campus community. For these reasons, Villanova University engages in risk reduction strategies, emphasizing the collective responsibility of our campus community to reduce the risk of sexual assault, sexual misconduct within our community. As a part of that effort, every employee and most students are required to complete sexual violence prevention education, which includes bystander intervention which empowers community members to take a role in preventing and interrupting incidents of sexual misconduct. 

Risk reduction involves changing or modifying behaviors and actions in order to possibly prevent sexual violence on an individual level. Risk reduction is intended to increase empowerment in order to promote safety. While being equipped with, and using, strategies to reduce risk for yourself and others is an active way to address sexual violence on campus, only perpetrators are responsible for their actions. 

The following are some risk reduction strategies which are drawn heavily from Rape Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), the nation’s largest anti-sexual assault organization: 

INCREASING ON AND OFF CAMPUS SAFETY The following tips may reduce your risk for many different types of crimes, including sexual violence: 

  • Know your resources. Who should you contact if you or a friend needs help? Where should you go? Locate resources such as the Student Health Center, Public Safety, and a local sexual assault service provider such as the Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator (SARC) team or Delaware County Women Against Rape (WAR). Notice where emergency phones are located on campus, and program Public Safety’s emergency number into your cell phone for easy access. 
  • Stay alert. When you are moving around on or off campus, be aware of your surroundings and walk with a purpose. Consider inviting a friend to join you or asking Public Safety for an escort. If you are alone, only use headphones in one ear to stay aware of your surroundings. 
  • Be careful about posting your location. Many social media sites use geolocation to publicly share your location. Consider disabling this function and reviewing other social media settings. 
  • Think about Plan B. Spend some time thinking about back-up plans for potentially sticky situations. Make sure your phone is charged; but if your phone dies, try to have a few numbers memorized to get help. Do you have emergency cash in case you can’t use a credit card? Do you have the address to Villanova’s campus or your residence hall memorized? 

SAFETY IN SOCIAL SETTINGS 

It is possible to relax and have a good time while still making safety a priority. Consider these tips for staying safe and looking out for your friends in social settings: 

  • Make a plan. If you are going to a party, go with people you trust. Agree to watch out for each other and plan to leave together. If your plans change, make sure to touch base with the other people in your group. Do not leave someone stranded in an unfamiliar or unsafe situation. 
  • Protect your drink. Do not leave your drink unattended and watch out for your friends’ drinks if you can. If you go to the bathroom or step outside, take the drink with you or toss it out. Drink from unopened containers or drinks you watched being made and poured. It is not always possible to know if something has been added to your or someone’s drink.
  • Know your limits. Keep track of how many drinks you have had and be aware of your friends’ behavior. If one of you feels extremely tired or more drunk than you should, you may have been drugged. Leave the party or situation and find help immediately. 
  • It’s okay to lie. If you want to exit a situation immediately and are concerned about frightening or upsetting someone, it’s okay to lie. You are never obligated to remain in a situation that makes you feel uncomfortable, pressured, or threatened. You can also lie to help a friend leave a situation that you think may be dangerous. Some excuses you could use are needing to take care of another friend or family member, an urgent phone call, not feeling well, and having to be somewhere else by a certain time. 
  • Be a good friend. Trust your instincts. If you notice something that doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. 

HOW TO RESPOND IF SOMEONE IS PRESSURING YOU 

Perpetrators of sexual violence often use tactics, such as guilt or intimidation, to pressure a person into something they do not want to do. It can be upsetting, frightening, or uncomfortable if you find yourself in this situation. Remember that it is not your fault that the other person is acting this way—they are responsible for their own actions. The following tips may help you exit the situation safely: 

  • Remind yourself this is not your fault. You did not do anything wrong. It is the person who is pressuring you who is responsible. 
  • Trust your gut. Do not feel obligated to do anything you do not want to do. It does not matter why you do not want to do something. Simply not being interested is reason enough. Do only what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with. 
  • Have a code word. Develop a code with friends or family that means “I’m uncomfortable” or “I need help.” It could be a series of numbers you can text or a phrase you say out loud. This way you can communicate your concern and get help without alerting the person who is pressuring you. 
  • Say whatever you need to say to get to safety. If you are concerned about angering or upsetting this person, you can lie or make an excuse to create an exit. It may feel wrong to lie, but you are never obligated to remain in a situation that makes you feel uncomfortable, scared, or threatened. Whatever you need to say to stay safe is okay—even if it may seem embarrassing at the time. 
  • Think of an escape route. If you had to leave quickly, how would you do it? Locate the windows, doors, and any others means of exiting the situation. Are there people around who might be able to help you? How can you get their attention? Where can you go when you leave?

Villanova University Policy Regarding Students or Employees with Criminal Records 

Universities encompass a widely diverse population. It is possible that some members of this population have committed past crimes of which the University may or may not be aware. 

Background investigations are conducted, as a matter of University policy, for all new faculty and staff hires and for existing employees who work with minors. Although background checks are not performed on student applicants, the University’s applications require prospective students to disclose whether they have ever been convicted of a misdemeanor, felony or other crime. If an applicant discloses a criminal conviction, the Office of University Admission gives it careful consideration in the admissions process. 

When information concerning criminal conduct is brought to the University’s attention, it is given appropriate consideration. Pursuant to the University’s Drug-Free Workplace Policy, any employee who is convicted under a criminal drug statute for a violation occurring in the workplace is subject to disciplinary procedures and may be required to participate in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program. 

When the University becomes aware of currently enrolled students who are charged with and/or convicted of a criminal offense, they are subject to the University’s disciplinary process. Students are subject to the full range of disciplinary sanctions provided in the Code of Student Conduct. 

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, a Federal law, requires institutions of higher education to advise the campus community as to where information concerning registered sex offenders may be obtained. In Pennsylvania, information about sexually violent predators is accessible at the Pennsylvania State Police Megan's Law website

As part of its Augustinian Catholic mission, Villanova has a program in a local Pennsylvania prison to educate inmates. A select few of these students are admitted to the University as part-time commuter students for the purpose of completing their education upon release. These students are subjected to a rigorous application and vetting process before a special admissions committee that includes criminologists, sociologists, a Public Safety representative and the Dean of Students. For Fall Semester 2020, it is anticipated that no such students will be enrolled on-campus.

Missing Students 

The University has adopted a missing student notification policy whereby students can register confidential contact information for a person to be notified by the University in the event the student is officially reported as missing. Students may fill out an online form at any point throughout the year. After logging in, click on the Novasis link, Personal tab, Missing Student Form.

This information will be confidential, accessible only to authorized campus officials and law enforcement personnel and may not be disclosed outside of a missing person investigation. 

All reports of missing students (missing for 24 hours) should be made to the Department of Public Safety. Missing student reports must be referred immediately to the Department of Public Safety as per Federal law. After investigating the missing person report, should the Department of Public Safety determine that the student is missing and has been missing for more than 24 hours, these procedures will be followed within 24 hours (regardless of whether the student has identified a contact person, is above the age of 18 or is an emancipated minor): Public Safety will notify the Radnor Township Police Department (and/or the appropriate law enforcement agency in the jurisdiction where the student went missing) and the student’s missing person contact no later than 24 hours after such determination. If the student is under 18 years old and is not emancipated, the student’s parent or guardian will be notified, in addition to any designated confidential contact. 

If a student has been determined missing for more than 24 hours, in addition to the above notifications, specific procedures to follow include: contacting the student’s Resident Assistant(s), checking with emergency health care providers and taking such other investigative actions as are appropriate under the circumstances. The University will implement these procedures in less than 24 hours if circumstances warrant a faster implementation.

Child Abuse Reporting and Minors on Campus 

All Villanova University faculty and staff who come into direct contact with a child as part of their employment are mandated reporters which means that they have a duty to report suspected child abuse, regardless of when or where the alleged abuse occurred. In addition, all Villanova University students and volunteers who accept responsibility for a child as an integral part of a program, activity or service sponsored by Villanova are also mandated reporters. Instances of suspected child abuse must be reported to the Department of Human Services (DHS). Upon making the report to DHS, a report must also be made to the Director of Public Safety, or the Executive Vice President. The Villanova University Child Abuse Reporting policy underscores our commitment to the protection and safety of minors who visit our campus and provides detailed information as to who must report, what must be reported, and how and when to report suspected child abuse. See the Villanova University Child Abuse Reporting Policy.

The University has also adopted the Minors in Villanova University Programs policy which outlines various protocols designed to protect the safety and well-being of minors participating in University programs. Questions about this policy can be referred to the University Compliance Office. See the Minors in Villanova University Programs Policy.

Policy on Preparing the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report 

The University has advised and trained individuals who are deemed “Campus Security Authorities” by the Federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act of their duty to report all Clery Act crimes to the Department of Public Safety for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. This includes but is not limited to the Dean of Students and the Assistant Dean of Students; all other Deans; all Athletic Directors, coaches and other personnel with responsibility for athletic teams; and all persons identified as having significant responsibilities for student and campus activities. By law, Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors”, when acting as such, are not considered to be a Campus Security Authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. As a matter of policy, the Professional Counselors at Villanova University are encouraged, if and when they deem it appropriate, to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis to the Department of Public Safety. Crime statistics are maintained by the Department of Public Safety and are collected from Campus Security Authorities, the Dean of Students Office, the Radnor Township Police Department, and other local police for buildings owned or controlled by Villanova University and used for educational purposes in their respective jurisdictions. 

Each year, representatives from the Department of Public Safety, the Office of the Vice President for Student Life, the Office of University Communication and Marketing, the Dean of Students Office, the Office of the Vice President and General Counsel, the University Compliance Office, the Facilities Management Office, the Office of Residence Life, and the Department of Human Resources, review the current campus security report and provide information to update the report and compile the crime statistics for the most recent calendar year. 

The information in this brochure is provided as a part of Villanova’s continuing commitment to safety and security on campus in compliance with the Pennsylvania Uniform Crime Reporting Act and the Clery Act. Concerns, questions or complaints related to this document or the applicable statutes should be directed to the Director of Public Safety & Chief of Police either by mail at Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085, or by telephone at (610) 519-5800. 

HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY ACT (HEOA) VICTIM NOTIFICATION

 Villanova University will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence or a non-forcible sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the institution against a student who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall be treated as the alleged victim for purposes of this paragraph.

SEXUAL MISCONDUCT PREVENTION AND EDUCATION EFFORTS 

Villanova University is committed to the prevention of sexual misconduct. Throughout the year, programs and campaigns designed to promote a healthy campus culture and strategies to prevent sexual misconduct are presented by a variety of campus resources including New Student Orientation, Health Promotion, the Title IX Coordinator, peer educators and other Villanova students, and Public Safety. The University also promotes participation of student groups in all of its health promotion and prevention efforts, through training provided in Residence Life, Athletics, ROTC, and the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, among others. The following are ongoing health promotion and prevention campaigns and programs currently offered or planned for this academic year. Additionally, the University has also established a campus-wide Sexual Violence Prevention Advisory Committee who assesses the University’s efforts and provide recommendations on enhancing these efforts to better serve our community.

Table of ongoing health promotion and prevention campaigns and programs currently offered or planned for this academic year.

INITIATIVE

AUDIENCE

FREQUENCY

Sexual Assault Prevention for Undergraduates (SAPU) Course

online course offered to all incoming undergraduate students; includes customized information (Villanova policies, processes & procedures; custom videos delivered by Title IX Coordinator(s), SARC team member(s), POWER peer educators and student leaders, faculty, and Counseling Center representatives; and all campus resources and services related to sexual violence, including prevention initiatives)

100% of incoming undergraduate students

Annual

Moments that Matter:

video presentation (part of New Student Orientation program) delivered by current Villanova students, faculty and staff with follow-up discussion (led by Orientation Counselors) focused on high-risk alcohol use and sexual violence, with a particular focus on safe and effective bystander intervention skills and campus resources

First year students

Annual at New Student Orientation

Sexual Violence Resource Brochure:

brochure highlighting Villanova policy and Pennsylvania law regarding sexual violence; campus and community resources; general information about sexual violence on college campuses; safe and effective bystander intervention strategies

All first year students receive the link at New Student Orientation; all upperclassmen residential students receive the link from their Resident Assistant; all graduate, law and upperclassmen also receive e-copies of the brochure (to account for students living off campus); print copies available in key offices

Annual

Sexual Violence Resource Bathroom Flyer: 

posted in every residence hall bathroom with all contact information for sexual violence-related resources and services; denoting places to report, confidential support, 24/7 resources, and how to get involved

All residential students

Year-round

Wildcat Newswire Sexual Violence Resource Highlight: 

short description of a resource related to sexual violence, how to access the resource, and what reasons a student might access a particular resource

All undergraduate, graduate and law students

Weekly, when classes are in session

Did You Know? e-mail:

outlines the protections and rights enjoyed as a result of various Villanova policies, Federal law, and reinforcement of existing resources around a variety of areas (e.g., Code of Student Conduct, academic policies, Title IX)

All undergraduate, graduate and law students

Periodically throughout the academic year

Where is the Love? #itsonusnova campaign: 

We believe that love (caritas) is essential to the life of our community. It is in the caring of self and others that make us strive to our fullest potential. Throughout the year the Where is the Love? #itsonusnova logo (see below) indicates how to extend an unconditional hand of friendship to each other as well as how to keep ourselves healthy and safe. The General Where is the Love? campaign provides information on a variety of health-related issues but #itsonusnova focuses on and sexual violence related issues and how to safely and effectively intervene to prevent them.

All Public Service Announcements developed under this campaign are available on the Where is the Love? webpage.

 

All students; any followers of the #itsonusnova social media accounts (Facebook and Instagram)

Year-round

Where is the Love? bystander intervention training 

around situations of concern (e.g., alcohol poisoning and sexual violence), understanding consent, understanding how alcohol is involved in most incidents of sexual violence, safe and effective ways to intervene in situations involving alcohol and/or sexual assault, and resources on campus for survivors; facilitated by Health Promotion staff, Title IX Coordinator, and a group of adjunct facilitators in Housing and Residence Life, Fraternity & Sorority Life, Campus Ministry, Honors, Public Administration, Counseling Education, and Athletics.

The following students are trained: ALL new fraternity and sorority members; ALL first-year student-athletes (as part of their 4 year sexual violence prevention curriculum); ALL New Student Orientation Staff; ALL Healthy Living Learning Community students; Army and Navy ROTC; students involved in Music Activities; ALL club sport athletes; and any other interested students and student groups

Year-round

One Love Escalation Workshop

film-based workshop which helps students identify and address relationship abuse. Workshop includes guided discussion facilitated by Health Promotion staff, Title IX Coordinator, and a group of adjunct student and staff facilitators in Housing and Residence Life, Campus Ministry, Nursing and Athletics.

ALL second year student-athletes (as part of their 4 year sexual violence prevention curriculum), members of various fraternities and sororities and any other interested students and student groups

Approximately 4 times per academic year

Domestic Violence Awareness Month (October): 

activities and information related to recognizing, responding to, and supporting others who have experienced dating and domestic violence. Month features varying programs each year with One Love Escalation workshops, SARC and Title IX team meet and greet opportunities, and other programs and activities designed to address campus climate and student needs and interests

Open to all students

Annual

Healthy Relationships Awareness Month (February)

activities and information related to maintaining healthy relationships, to include identifying signs of an unhealthy or violent relationship, how to help a friend in an unhealthy relationship, and related issues.

In addition to varying programs each year, a PSA on consent debuted in February 2017 and was shared on all #itsonusnova social media platforms and in Campus Currents and Wildcat Newswire. You can view the PSA (and others) on the Where is the Love? webpage.

Open to all students

Annual

Title IX Meet and Greet Series: 

periodic informal meet and greet opportunities to connect with members of the Title IX and SARC team to increase student awareness and comfort connecting with campus resources for those who have experienced sexual violence

Open to all students, faculty, and staff

Annual

Bulletin Board Series:

series of bulletin board displays available for Resident Assistants to post in their residence halls at any point in the academic year; currently available for use at any time are bulletin board packets on the topics of stalking, dating and domestic violence, Villanova’s policy on sexual violence, SAVUR app, and bystander intervention

Residential undergraduate students

Year-round

Sexual Assault Awareness Month (April)

activities and information related to sexual assault, to include how to help a survivor of sexual assault, resource awareness, and risk reduction strategies for perpetration and victimization

In addition to varying programs each year, notably the Clothesline Project and Walk a Mile in Their Shoes, two PSAs, one on supporting survivors and one focused on men preventing sexual violence are periodically and shared on all #itsonusnova social media platforms and in Campus Currents and Wildcat Newswire. You can view these PSAs (and others) on the Where is the Love? webpage.

 

Open to all students

Annual

Stall Street Journal toilet stall & Campus Well e-publication:

featuring tips and strategies related to a variety of student health issues, including sexual violence, relationships, consent, bystander intervention strategies, and resources related to sexual violence; provides a companion parent/faculty/staff-friendly version of each student publication each month; every Campus Well issue features sexual violence-related article

All undergraduate students, graduate students, and law students; all faculty, staff and parents

Monthly (with the exception of the summer months–one issue posted from June-July)

Sexual Assault Villanova University Resource (SAVUR) smartphone app

comprehensive and customized app with all Villanova and local community resources and services related to sexual violence, including GPS functionality and direct dialing to all denoted resources; links to all online publications and policies and comprehensive Web site on sexual assault.

Anyone with a smartphone

Year-round

Social media outreach:

through the use of Facebook, and Instagram accounts, social media featuring scheduled messaging around bystander intervention, campus and community resources, and a series of messages to raise awareness about policies and resources. The following social media accounts post regularly (e.g., It’s On Us) and/or periodic content (e.g., POWER) related to sexual violence.

It’s On Us Nova Facebook, & Instagram accounts; POWER Facebook & Instagram accounts; Health Promotion Facebook & Instagram accounts; Student Health 101 Facebook account

Anyone who follows these accounts

Year-round

Web resources & materials: 

one comprehensive Web site links to all relevant sites, policies, and information and also serves as the hub for sexual violence-related information and resources.

ALL external and internal constituencies have access to this Web site and those that link to/from this site

Reviewed and updated annually and/or as information becomes available or necessary

to post

Sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention on-line training module

Mandatory for all employees

Year-round with all new hires; periodically for current employees

POWER peer education training & programming

Trained undergraduate students provide programs by request to any student organization

All POWER peer educators receive training related to sexual violence provided jointly by the Title IX Coordinator and go through Where is the Love? Bystander intervention training; they are supervised by a trained SARC team member/Health Promotion staff member

POWER peer educator training occurs every semester; POWER programs are presented by request, when classes are in session

Residence hall floor meeting discussion: 

RA-facilitated floor meeting focused on building community which includes specific information about sexual violence on college campuses, along with campus and community resources; includes distribution of the sexual violence resource brochure to all upperclassmen residents

All residential students

Annual each Fall semester

Small group social norms: 

this approach is typically conducted with high-risk groups of students and aims to correct group misperceptions of student alcohol use and sexual violence; data are presented to students to demonstrate discrepancies between perceived and actual group norms; participants are encouraged to examine their personal perceptions and behaviors compared with the actual norms

All fraternity and sorority students participate in the ACHA-NCHA and Chapter reports are generated to demonstrate Chapter trends around a variety of health issues, including alcohol use and sexual violence; these data are used to inform prevention efforts on a Chapter level with every fraternity and sorority

Survey conducted every three years; action plan is ongoing over the course of the three years between surveys

National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA)

nationally recognized research survey collecting precise data about student health habits, behaviors, and perceptions; Villanova participates in this survey, along with over 450 colleges and universities annually

Offer to random sample of undergraduate students, as determined by the Office of Planning and Institutional Research (OPIR)

Every three to four years

Villanova University Student Sexual Violence Climate Survey:

reliable and validated climate survey; measures general campus climate; perceptions of leadership, policies, and reporting; experiences of sexual violence, stalking and relationship violence; readiness to help; bystander confidence; bystander norms; bystander behaviors; and rape myth acceptance.

All undergraduate students invited to participate in Fall 2015 and ALL students (undergraduate, graduate, law, professional studies and on-line) invited to participate in Fall 2018

Every three to four years; focus groups to be facilitated during the years between surveys

Faculty Programs—New Faculty Orientation & Teaching and Learning Strategies Program: 

University Compliance Office, General Counsel, Student Life, Environmental Health and Safety and Athletics work closely with Villanova Institute for Teaching and Learning (VITAL) to facilitate case study discussions on legal issues and policies pertaining to faculty’s instructional role. Sexual harassment, sexual assault and mandatory reporting policies are reviewed in addition to campus resources and reporting procedures.

Offered to new faculty at Orientation and to any faculty attending Teaching and Learning Strategies Program

Annually

Law School Orientation: 

Presentation on Villanova policies, processes, procedures and campus resources/services related to sexual violence and other Title IX related issues.

Required of all first year law students

Annually

Employee education and training opportunities:

programs that supplement mandatory employee training that focus topics such as: Intervention Strategies in the Workplace, Responding When a Student Discloses an Experience of Sexual Violence and Understanding and Preventing Sexual Violence.

Open to all employees

Multiple times throughout the year

Athletics department education: 

consistent with NCAA Board of Governors Policy on Campus Sexual Violence, student-athletes, coaches and staff receive education on policies and processes regarding sexual violence prevention, intervention, response and adjudication. The four-year curriculum for student-athletes [and coaches, in some instances] are outlined here:

  • First year: Sexual Assault Prevention Education for Undergraduates (SAPU) online course, Moments that Matter orientation program, and Where is the Love? bystander intervention training
  • Second year: One Love Escalation workshop
  • Third year: Sexual Assault Prevention for Student-Athletes online course
  • Fourth year: Healthy Professional Relationships workshop
  • Coaches and Athletics staff: Sexual Assault Prevention for Athletics staff online course or other in-person training and education

All student-athletes, coaches and athletics staff

Annually

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Villanova University Crime Statistics for Federal Reporting Purposes 2017–2019

JEANNE CLERY DISCLOSURE OF CAMPUS SECURITY POLICY AND CAMPUS CRIME STATISTICS ACT 

The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act requires the release of statistics for certain criminal incidents, arrests and disciplinary referrals on campus to all students and employees. The law requires that these statistics be shown in specific geographic categories. The following statistics are provided in compliance with the specific time periods, crime classifications, geographic categories and arrest data mandated by Federal law. Please note that these statistics use Federal crime classifications which vary from the crime classifications under state law, which are also published in this brochure. The statistics reported below reflect the number of incidents reported to the University’s Department of Public Safety and/or Campus Security Authorities. They do not indicate actual criminal prosecution or student disciplinary action, or the outcome of either.

TABLE OF CRIME STATISTICS FOR 2017–2019
 

On-Campus

(including residential) 

On-Campus

Residential (1)

Non- Campus (1)

Public

Property (1)

TOTALS
  ’17 ’18 ’19 ’17 ’18 ’19 ’17 ’18 ’19 ’17 ’18 ’19 ’17 ’18 ’19
Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Rape

5 3 10 4 3 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 10

Fondling

1 2 5 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 5

Incest

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Statutory Rape

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Stalking

1

2

2

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

2

Domestic Violence

1

1

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

1

Dating Violence

1

3

2

1

3

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

2

Robbery

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

1

Aggravated Assault

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

Burglary

10

10

5

3

7

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

10

5

Arson

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

Motor Vehicle Theft

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

0

Liquor Law—Arrests

11

8

8

3

5

1

0

0

0

0

1

6

11

9

14

Drug Law—Arrests

2

5

8

1

0

5

0

0

0

0

2

2

2

7

10

Weapons Possession—Arrests

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Liquor Law—Referrals

527

510

446

450

421

349

0

0

0

0

1

2

527

511

448

Drug Law—Referrals

49

43

39

37

18

33

0

0

0

1

0

0

50

43

39

Weapons Possession—Referrals

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1. The Clery Act requires crime statistics to be shown by the following geographic categories: on-campus (including dormitories or other student residential facilities); on-campus dormitories or other student residential facilities; non-campus buildings or properties; and public property. The non-campus category consists of buildings or properties owned or controlled by the University that are used in direct support of, or in relation to, the University’s educational purposes, are frequently used by students, and are not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the University’s campus. Non-campus properties also include certain foreign locations, where the University has a written agreement to own or control housing or classroom space.

TABLE OF HATE CRIME STATISTICS*

2019

Incident #1: A reported incident of intimidation characterized by ethnic bias occurred in a University residence hall. Incident #2: A reported incident of intimidation characterized by racial bias occurred in a University residence hall.

2018

Incident #1: A reported incident of intimidation characterized by ethnic bias was reported on campus but determined to be unfounded.

2017

Incident #1: A reported incident of intimidation characterized by ethnic bias was received via a Twitter message on campus. Incident #2: A reported incident of intimidation characterized by ethnic bias occurred in a University residence hall.

* Hate crimes describe the number of reported crimes that (i) are listed above, (ii) involve larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, or destruction, damage of or vandalism of property, or (iii) relate to other crimes involving bodily injury to any person that manifested evidence that the victim(s) were intentionally selected because of their actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, disability, national origin or gender identity.

TABLE OF UNFOUNDED CRIMES*

2019

There were two (2) unfounded crimes reported this year.

2018

There was one (1) unfounded crime reported this year.

2017

There was one (1) unfounded crime reported this year.

* Unfounded are considered false or baseless reports. Crime statistics contained in the chart do not reflect crimes later determined to be unfounded.

Villanova University Crime Statistics for Pennsylvania Reporting Purposes

THE PENNSYLVANIA UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING ACT 

The Pennsylvania Uniform Crime Reporting Act mandates the release of crime statistics and rates to matriculated students and employees, and, upon request, to new employees and applicants for admission. The index rate is calculated by multiplying the actual number of reported offenses by 100,000 (a theoretical population for comparison purposes) and dividing that product by the number of the University’s Full Time Equivalent (FTE) students and employees. The FTE is calculated using a State required formula. The University’s FTE Population was 12,608 in 2017 and 12,710 in 2018 and 12,201 in 2019. The statistics reported below reflect the number of incidents reported to the University’s Department of Public Safety (but do not include reports from other campus security authorities, referrals from campus disciplinary authorities or reports from local law enforcement). They do not indicate actual criminal prosecution or student disciplinary action, or the outcome of either. Please note that the State crime classifications for which the University is reporting these statistics vary from the crime classifications under Federal law, which are also published in this brochure.

Table of of incidents reported to the University’s Department of Public Safety
  2017 2018 2019
  ACTUAL INDEX* ACTUAL INDEX* ACTUAL INDEX*
PART I OFFENSES

Murder

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Manslaughter

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Rape

5

39.66

3

23.60

10

81.96

Robbery

2

15.86

0

0.00

1

8.19

Aggravated Assault

1

7.93

1

7.87

0

0.00

Other Assault

9

71.38

17

133.75

12

98.35

Burglary

10

79.31

10

78.68

5

40.98

Theft

65

515.54

58

456.33

44

360.63

Theft Vehicle

2

15.86

1

7.87

0

0.00

Arson

1

7.93

2

15.74

0

0.00

TOTAL

95

753.47

92

723.84

72

590.11

PART II OFFENSES

Forgery and Counterfeiting

11

87.25

12

94.41

9

73.76

Fraud and Embezzlement

0

0.00

2

15.74

0

0.00

Receiving Stolen Property

5

39.66

4

31.47

5

40.98

Vandalism

26

206.22

36

283.24

37

303.25

Weapons

0

0.00

0

0.00

1

8.19

Prostitution

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Other Sex Offenses

1

7.93

6

47.21

4

32.78

Narcotics

30

237.94

24

188.83

29

237.69

Gambling

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Family Offenses

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

Driving Under The Influence

0

0.00

3

23.60

1

8.19

Liquor Law Possession

176

1395.94

173

1361.13

172

1409.72

Drunkenness

13

103.11

28

220.30

22

180.31

Disorderly Conduct

44

348.98

51

401.26

31

254.08

Vagrant

0

0.00

0

0.00

0

0.00

All Others

29

230.10

11

86.55

21

172.12

TOTAL

335

2657.13

350

2753.74

332

2721.07

GRAND TOTAL

430

3410.60

442

3477.58

404

3311.18

*Index per 100,000

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Campus Fire Safety

Fire Drills 

Mandatory fire drills are typically conducted at least three times per year in Residence Halls. These drills are jointly supervised by personnel from the Office of Residence Life, the Department of Public Safety, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety and the Office of Facilities Management. In addition, mandatory fire drills are conducted once each year in the academic and office buildings. 

Campus Fire Safety 

Villanova University is committed to fire safety in its residence halls and elsewhere on campus. All 32 residence halls are equipped with fire alarm monitoring, sprinkler systems, smoke and heat detectors, fire extinguishers, emergency lighting systems, emergency exit doors and evacuation plans and/or placards. 

The following is a description of the fire safety systems found in each on-campus residential facility.

Table of fire safety systems found in each on-campus residential facility

On-Campus Residential Facility

Fire Alarm Monitoring Done on Site

Partial Sprinkler Systems (1)

Full Sprinkler Systems (2)

Smoke Detectors

Heat

Detector

Fire Extinguisher

Emergency Exit Door

Emergency Lighting System

Evacuation Plans

and/or

Placards

Number of Evacuation (fire) Drills each calendar year

Alumni Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Arch Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Austin Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Canon Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Caughlin Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Chapter Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Corr Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Cupola Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Delurey Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Farley Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Fedigan Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Friar Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Gallen Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Good Counsel Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Jackson Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Katharine Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Klekotka Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

McGuire Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Moriarity Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Moulden Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

O’Dwyer Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Rudolph Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Sheehan Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Simpson Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

St. Clare Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

St. Mary’s Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

St. Monica Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

St. Rita Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Stanford Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Sullivan Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

Trinity Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

1*

Welsh Hall

X

N/A

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

3

The street address for each on-campus residence facility is 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085.
Arch Hall, Canon Hall, Chapter Hall, Cupola Hall, Friar Hall, and Trinity Hall opened August 2019.
(1) Partial Sprinkler System is defined as having sprinklers in the common areas only
(2) Full Sprinkler System is defined as having sprinklers in both the common areas and individual rooms.

Fire Safety Policies 

The Code of Student Conduct contains various policies for fire safety as follows: 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

Because of their potential contribution to accidental fires and unsanitary health conditions and in an effort to conserve energy, the following electrical appliances are restricted or prohibited in all University residences. Students found in violation of these policies will be subject to immediate confiscation and disposal of the appliance(s), and referral for disciplinary action. 

  • Hot plates, toaster ovens, space heaters and any appliance with an open heating element are prohibited. 
  • All lamps and appliances should be UL approved. Halogen lamps are prohibited. 
  • Only Villanova University supplied air conditioners are permitted in University residence halls. Students requiring air conditioning due to documented medical necessity should contact the Office for Residence Life. 
  • Refrigerators are restricted to one 5-cubic foot unit per room. 
  • Extension cords/multiple-plug attachments should be UL approved, unfrayed and without splices or taps. 
  • Extension cords/plugs should not be placed under carpets, tacked or stapled. 
  • Major appliances should not be plugged into extension cords. 
  • Plug adapters should be UL approved and not rated less than 125 volts/15 amperes. Residents should employ the prudent use of surge protectors to protect property from unexpected electrical damage. 
  • Heavy drawing appliances (irons, hair dryers, televisions, refrigerators, microwaves) should be plugged directly into socket outlets and unplugged when not in use. Extension cords are not to be used with these items.

ALARMS 

Students may not disregard a fire alarm or refuse to evacuate a building in which an alarm is sounding, regardless of its nature (drill, false alarm or actual alert). Residents who fail to evacuate a building in a voluntary and timely manner will be subject to disciplinary action as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. 

CANDLES/OPEN FLAMES 

Candles (of any type or form, whether decorative or functional), open flames, potpourri burners and the use of incense are all prohibited in University residence halls and apartments. Prohibited items will be confiscated and not returned. Violations may result in disciplinary action as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. 

EQUIPMENT 

Tampering with or misuse of fire safety equipment (extinguishers, fire hoses, smoke detectors, alarms, sprinklers, exit signs) is considered to be exceptionally dangerous behavior in a residential community and represents a serious breach of community safety standards. Students found responsible for tampering with or misusing fire safety equipment will be subject to disciplinary action as outlined in the Code of Student Conduct. When individuals responsible for activating a false fire alarm or damaging a fire extinguisher fail to claim direct responsibility for that behavior, cannot be identified by Residence Life staff and are not identified by the residents of the building in which the vandalism occurred, the penalties in question may be assessed against the entire hall. 

FIRE DOORS 

Fire Doors must not be propped open. 

HOLIDAY DECORATIONS 

Due to potential fire hazards, the use of holiday decorations must adhere to the University’s guidelines. No live trees, wreaths or garlands (treated or untreated) are permitted. Decorative lights must be UL approved and may not be placed on the outside of doors, windows or buildings. It is against policy to leave decorative lights on when no one is present in the room to attend to them. Decorative lights may not be hung from ceilings, nor may they obstruct doors or windows. Decorations should be flame retardant and must not be placed on the exterior of room doors; near or over electrical outlets; on or near light fixtures, fire safety equipment, or radiators or heating vents/units. All holiday decorations must be removed before vacating the room for breaks. 

SMOKING 

All residence halls and apartments are smoke free. Smoking and vaping are strictly prohibited in all areas (public areas and student rooms) of these buildings. In accordance with University policy, smoking and vaping are permitted outside of residence halls, provided the person is 25 feet from an entrance or exit, air intake ducts or windows.

Fire Emergency and Evacuation Procedures 

In the event of evidence of a fire, a report should be made immediately by calling the Department of Public Safety at 4444 or 9-4444 from an on-campus telephone or (610) 519-4444 from a non-University telephone. If a member of the Villanova community finds evidence of a fire that has been extinguished, and the person is not sure whether Public Safety has already responded, the community member should immediately notify Public Safety to investigate and document the incident. This report should include the location and nature of the fire. Once the fire has been reported, the Department of Public Safety will initiate the emergency actions required. 

A visible fire or the presence of smoke provides sufficient cause to evacuate a building. In the event of a fire or hazardous materials emergency within a campus building, it is necessary, as well as safest, for occupants to evacuate. University policy calls for total evacuation of the building or area affected. 

A Fire Emergency exists whenever: 

  • A building fire evacuation alarm is sounding. 
  • An uncontrolled fire or imminent fire hazard occurs in any building or area of campus. 
  • There is the presence of smoke or the odor of burning of any material. 
  • There is an uncontrolled release of combustible or toxic gas or other hazardous material, or a flammable liquid spill.

STUDENT HOUSING FIRE EVACUATION PROCEDURES IN CASE OF A FIRE: 

  • The fire alarm system may be used to evacuate a building(s) if there is a potential threat to the health and safety of that segment of the community. 
  • Activate the building fire alarm if it is not already sounding. Pull a fire alarm station on the way out. If the building is not equipped with a fire alarm, knock on doors and shout on your way out. 
  • Leave the building by using the nearest exit. 
  • Know more than one way out of the residence hall. 
  • Crawl if there is smoke. Cleaner, cooler air will be near the floor. Get Low and Go. 
  • Before opening any doors, feel the metal knob. If it is hot, do not open the door. If it is cool, brace yourself against the door, open it slightly, and if heat or heavy smoke are present, close the door and stay in the room. 
  • Go to the nearest exit or stairway. If the nearest exit is blocked by fire, heat or smoke, go to another exit. Always use an exit stairway, not an elevator. Elevator shafts may fill with smoke or the power may fail, leaving you trapped. Stairway fire doors will keep out fire and smoke, if they are closed, and will protect you until you get outside. Close as many doors as possible as you leave. This helps to confine the fire. Total and immediate evacuation is safest. Only use a fire extinguisher if the fire is very small and you know how to do it safely. Do not delay calling emergency responders or activating the building fire alarm. If you cannot put out the fire, leave immediately. Make sure the fire department is called—even if you think the fire is out. 
  • If you get trapped, keep the doors closed. Place cloth material (wet, if possible) around and under door to prevent smoke from entering. 
  • Be prepared to signal your presence from a window. 
  • Signal for help. Hang an object at the window (jacket, shirt) to attract the fire department’s attention. If there is a phone in the room, call 911 or 4444 or 9-4444 from an on-campus phone, or (610) 519-4444 from a cellular phone, and report that you are trapped. Be sure to give your room number and location. If all exits from a floor are blocked, go back to your room, close the door, seal cracks, open the windows if safe, wave something out the window and shout or phone for help. 
  • If you are on fire, stop, drop and roll, wherever you are. Rolling smothers fire. 
  • Cool burns. Use cool tap water on burns immediately. Don’t use ointments. If skin is blistered, brown or charred, call for an ambulance. 
  • Be aware of obstacles. Storage of any items in the corridors, such as bicycles, chairs, desks and other items is prohibited in all exit ways, including stairwells. Blocked exits and obstacles impede evacuation, especially during dark and smoky conditions. 
  • If you are a person with a disability (even temporarily), you should do the following: 
    • Learn about fire safety 
    • Plan ahead for fire emergencies 
    • Be aware of your own capabilities and limitations. 
    • Be aware of “areas of refuge” in the buildings you frequent. 

More detailed procedures for evacuation of campus buildings are set forth in the Emergency and Evacuation Procedures in the Emergency Preparedness Procedures section and in the Emergency Guidebook

Fire Safety Education 

Fire safety education is accomplished by various methods throughout the school year. Floor plans, evacuation routes, evacuation assembly locations, drill procedures and fire safety policies are reviewed by Resident Assistants at the first floor meeting at the beginning of each academic year. Laminated floor plans and evacuation routes are publicly posted on each floor of each residence hall. The University celebrates Fire Prevention Week to promote Campus Fire Safety, and hands-on fire extinguishing training is offered periodically, during which employees and students have an opportunity to extinguish a fire. In addition, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety provides information and safety brochures for Campus Fire Safety.

Daily Fire Log 

The Department of Public Safety maintains a chronological log of all reported crimes for the past 60 days, which is available for public inspection at the Public Safety front desk in Garey Hall. In addition to crimes, the log also contains all actual fires reported or discovered within University-owned residence halls for the past 60 days. Log entries older than 60 days will be made available within two business days upon request to Mrs. Debra Patch, Deputy Chief of Police/ Associate Director for Administration, by email at debra.patch@villanova.edu or by phone at (610) 519-6983.

Plans for Future Improvements in Fire Safety 

Villanova completed upgrades of its sprinklers and fire safety systems over the past several years. At this time, there are no specific plans for future improvements. However, Villanova will continually review its prevention strategies (education, inspections, fire drills, and device maintenance), and will continue to upgrade fire safety systems throughout the campus as necessary.

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Fire Statistics

The following sets forth information about all fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2019.

Table of fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2019.
BUILDING TOTAL #
FIRES IN
BLDG.
FIRE
NUMBER
DATE CAUSE $
DAMAGES
INJURIES FATALITIES #DRILLS

Alumni Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Arch Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

1**

Austin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Canon Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

1**

Caughlin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Chapter Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

1**

Corr Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Cupola Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Delurey Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Farley Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

1**

Fedigan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Friar Hall 0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2

Gallen Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Good Counsel Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Jackson Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Katharine Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Klekotka Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

McGuire Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Moriarity Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Moulden Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

O’Dwyer Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Rudolph Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Sheehan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Simpson Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Clare Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Mary’s Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Monica Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Rita Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Stanford Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Sullivan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Trinity Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

1**

Welsh Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

* Reportable fires are “any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.”
**New Residence halls opened in the fall semester 2019. 

The street address for each on-campus residence facility is 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085
Arch Hall, Canon Hall, Chapter Hall, Cupola Hall, Friar Hall, and Trinity Hall opened in August 2019.

The following sets forth information about all fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2018.

Table of fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2018.
BUILDING TOTAL #
FIRES IN
BLDG.
FIRE
NUMBER
DATE CAUSE $
DAMAGES
INJURIES FATALITIES #DRILLS

Alumni Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Arch Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Austin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Canon Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Caughlin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Chapter Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Corr Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Cupola Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Delurey Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Farley Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Fedigan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Friar Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Gallen Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Good Counsel Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Jackson Hall

1

1

2/12/18

Unintentional Fire – Cooking

$0-$99

0

0

3

Katharine Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Klekotka Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

McGuire Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Moriarity Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Moulden Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

O’Dwyer Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Rudolph Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Sheehan Hall

1

1

3/11/18

Dryer lint

$0-$99

0

0

3

Simpson Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

St. Clare Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

St. Mary’s Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

St. Monica Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

St. Rita Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Stanford Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Sullivan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

Trinity Hall

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Welsh Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

*Reportable fires are “any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.”
The street address for each on-campus residence facility is 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 

The following sets forth information about all fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2017.

Table of fires that occurred in on-campus residential units during calendar year 2017.
BUILDING TOTAL #
FIRES IN
BLDG.
FIRE
NUMBER
DATE CAUSE $
DAMAGES
INJURIES FATALITIES #DRILLS

Alumni Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Austin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Caughlin Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Corr Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Delurey Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Farley Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Fedigan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Gallen Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Good Counsel Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Jackson Hall

2

11

4/21/17

9/11/17

Unintentional/Cooking

Unintentional/Open Flame

$0–$99$0–$99

00

00

2

Katharine Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Klekotka Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

3

McGuire Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Moriarity Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Moulden Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

O’Dwyer Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Rudolph Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Sheehan Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Simpson Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Clare Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Mary’s Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Monica Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

St. Rita Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Stanford Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

Sullivan Hall

1

1

2/18/17

Unintentional/Electrical

$100-$999

0

0

2

Welsh Hall

0

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

0

0

2

*Reportable fires are “any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.”
The street address for each on-campus residence facility is 800 Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085

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Villanova University Information

Villanova University was founded in 1842 by the Order of St. Augustine. To this day, Villanova’s Augustinian Catholic intellectual tradition is the cornerstone of an academic community in which students learn to think critically, act compassionately and succeed while serving others. Villanova prepares students to become ethical leaders who create positive change everywhere life takes them. Undergraduate and graduate degrees are offered in the University’s six colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Villanova School of Business, the College of Engineering, the M. Louise Fitzpatrick College of Nursing, the College of Professional Studies and the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law. 

The Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA, PhD, became Villanova’s 32nd president in 2006. Villanova is located on a 254-acre campus in the suburbs, 12 miles west of Philadelphia. The Villanova community is made up of 6,516 full-time and 121 part-time undergraduate students; 2,855 graduate and law students; 718 full-time and 213 part-time faculty (FTE); 1,676 full-time and 49 part-time staff (FTE); and 20 college visitors and Diocesan scholars. Approximately 5,300 undergraduates reside on campus. (Student and faculty numbers are based on the Fall Semester 2019, Full-Time Equivalent data conducted in the previous calendar year.)

Emergency calls should be directed to Public Safety as follows: 

  • On campus: dial 4444 or 9-4444 
  • Non-emergency calls should be directed to (610) 519-5800 
  • Off campus or by cell phone: dial (610) 519-4444

Important Telephone Numbers: 

  • Director of Public Safety and Chief of Police (610) 519-6982 
  • Sexual Assault Resource Coordinator* (484) 343-6028 
  • Dean of Students (610) 519-4200 
  • Office for Residence Life (610) 519-4154 
  • Title IX Coordinator* (610) 519-8805 
  • Title IX Investigator* (484) 343-6926 
  • Sexual Harassment Complaint Officer/Deputy Title IX Coordinator* (610) 519-4550 
  • Student Health Center (610) 519-4070 
  • University Counseling Center (610) 519-4050 
  • Vice President for Student Life (610) 519-4550 
  • Villanova Weather and Emergency Information Hotline (610) 519-4505 
  • Campus Escort Service (610) 519-5800 
  • Confidential Reporting Hotline (855) 236-1443 

*See Campus and Community Resources, Confidential and Non-Confidential, for Sexual Misconduct for additional resources for sexual misconduct.


Helpful Websites:

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Campus Map

Public property on this map is delineated by green highlighting. Most non-campus locations are not shown on this map. Non-Campus location are those buildings or properties owned or controlled by the University that are used in direct support of, or in relation to, the University’s educational purposes, are frequented by students, and are not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the University’s campus. One non-campus location is shown on this map. The Villanova Center, identified as building 66, is a privately owned business complex. The University leases office space that houses the Office of Human Resources, Finance, and other administrative offices. Those areas within the Villanova Center that leased by the University are considered non-campus property for Clery reporting purposes.

Map of campus with roads, buildings and other markers

Color Legend

 

Pink: Non-Campus Property

 

Medium Blue: Academic Buildings

 

Red: On-campus Residential

 

Teal: Recreational Facilities

 

Dark Red: Administrative Building

 

Dark Blue: Plant/Maintenance/Storage

 

Light Blue: Multi-purpose Facilities

 

Grey: Parking/Access to Parking

 

Light Green: Public Property

 

Turquoise Blue: Blue line surrounding perimeter denotes on-campus boundary

 

(Yellow Dot) Call Box Indicator: Phones located at buildings with direct-dial to Public Safety are indicated on key; Call Boxes to Public Safety are indicated on map

Alphabetical Building List

Alumni Hall (20, Red)

Andrew J. Talley Athletic Center (35, Teal)

Arch Hall (67, Red)

Austin Hall (1, Red)

Bartley Hall (28, Medium Blue)

Burns Hall (62, Light Blue)

Canon Hall (69, Red)

Caughlin Hall (41, Red)

CEER: Center for Engineering Education and Research (6, Medium Blue)

Chapter Hall (70, Red)

Chemical Engineering Building (13, Medium Blue)

Connelly Center (24, Light Blue)

Corr Hall (21, Red)

Cupola Hall (71, Red)

Davis Center for Athletics and Fitness (32, Teal)

Delurey Hall (11, Red)

Donahue Hall (43, Light Blue)

Dougherty Hall (23, Light Blue)

Driscoll Hall (29, Medium Blue)

Facilities Management Building (65, Dark Blue)

Falvey Memorial Library (18, Light Blue)

Faris Structural Engineering Teaching and Research Laboratory (30, Medium Blue)

Farley Hall (55, Red)

Farrell Hall (48, Dark Red)

Fedigan Hall (12, Red)

Finneran Pavilion (33, Teal)

Friar Hall (72, Red)

Galberry Hall (37, Dark Red)

Gallen Hall (56, Red)

Garey Hall (52, Medium Blue)

Geraghty Hall (47, Dark Red)

Good Counsel Hall (44, Red)

Greenhouse (74, Medium Blue)

Griffin Hall (46, Dark Red)

Health Services Building (31, Light Blue)

Jackson Hall (59, Red)

Jake Nevin Field House (36, Teal)

John Barry Hall (15, Medium Blue)

John and Joan Mullen Center for the Performing Arts (73, Light Blue)

Alphabetical Building List (cont'd)

Katharine Hall (40, Red)

Kennedy Hall (22, Light Blue)

Klekotka Hall (54, Red)

Law School Building (51, Medium Blue)

McGuire Hall (42, Red)

Mendel Science Center (16, Medium Blue)

Middleton Hall (9, Dark Red)

Military Sciences Building (10, Red)

Moriarty Hall (45, Red)

Moulden Hall (57, Red)

O’Dwyer Hall (8, Red)

Old Falvey Library (17, Light Blue)

Picotte Hall at Dundale (63, Dark Red)

Rudolph Hall (58, Red)

St. Augustine Center for the Liberal Arts (19, Medium Blue)

St. Clare Hall (60, Red)

St. Mary’s Hall (53, Red)

St. Monica Hall (39, Red)

St. Rita’s Hall (2, Red)

St. Thomas of Villanova Church (3, Light Blue)

St. Thomas of Villanova Monastery (4, Light Blue)

Sheehan Hall (26, Red)

Simpson Hall (7, Red)

Stanford Hall (38, Red)

Steam Plant (64, Dark Blue)

Stone Hall (49, Dark Red)

Sullivan Hall (27, Red)

Technology Services Building (50, Dark Red)

Tolentine Hall (5, Medium Blue)

Trinity Hall (68, Red)

Vasey Hall (25, Medium Blue)

Villanova Center (66, Pink)

(789 Lancaster Avenue) Villanova Stadium (34, Teal)

Welsh Hall (61, Red)

White Hall (14, Medium Blue)

Athletics Parking Areas 

A-1 Jake Nevin Field House Lot 

A-2 Rear of Pavilion Lot 

A-3 Stadium and Galberry Area Lot 

Ithan Avenue Parking Areas 

I-1 Ithan Garage (Primary Student & Visitor Lot—Daily Fee Parking) 

I-2 South Campus Lot 

Lancaster Avenue Parking Areas 

L-1 Technical Services Building Lot 

L-2 Admissions Visitor Lot (Permit Required—Mon-Fri) 

L-3 Bridge Lot (Parish Events & Daily Fee Parking) 

L-4 The Commons

Main Campus Parking Lots 

M-1 HSB Garage

M-2 SAC Garage

M-3 Kennedy Hall Lot

M-4 Dougherty Drive

M-5 Facilities/Steam Plant Lot

Spring Mill Road Parking Lots

S-1 Monastery Lot

S-2 Tolentine and CEER Lot

S-3 Mendel Lot

S-4 North Campus Parking Garage

S-5 Law School Surface Lot

S-6 Garey Hall Lot

West Campus Parking Lots

W-1 Saint Mary's Hall Lot

W-2 Resident Student Parking Lot

W-3 Picotte Hall Lot