RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP

Villanova History faculty members are committed to sharing their scholarship with the public.

They are published authors who write books and articles for scholarly journals, newspapers and magazines, as well as participating in podcasts and creating digital projects. History faculty are willing mentors who guide students in their own scholarly endeavors.
 

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Lynne Hartnett, PhD

Lynne Hartnett, PhD, published her latest video and audio course for The Great Courses and the streaming service Wondrium. More than twenty-four lectures, Dr. Hartnett’s course “Great Revolutions of Modern History” explores how the most significant revolutions in the last 300 years have shaped the political, social, cultural and economic landscape of the 21st century.   

While this course detailed revolutions and political movements across the globe, Dr. Hartnett’s primary research focuses on the Russian revolutionary movement. She is currently working on a manuscript, Lenin’s Neighbors: Russian Political Exiles and Networks of Revolution in London, that examines how Russian political exiles and émigrés in London formed revolutionary networks that crossed national, cultural and class lines in the decades that immediately preceded the Russian Revolution.

RECENT FACULTY PUBLICATIONS

 Andrew Liu, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of History, next to the cover of his book Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

Andrew Liu, PhD
Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India

In his new book, Tea War: A History of Capitalism in China and India, Andrew Liu, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of History, explores the significance of tea in the economic history of China and south Asia. By extension, this work also contributes to a burgeoning interest in reimaging the history of capitalism on a global scale. READ MORE

Adele Lindenmeyr, PhD, Dean of Villanova University College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, next to her book Citizen Countess: Sofia Panina and the Fate of Revolutionary Russia

Adele Lindenmeyr, PhD
Citizen Countess: Sofia Panina and the Fate of Revolutionary Russia

Citizen Countess: Sofia Panina and the Fate of Revolutionary Russia by Adele Lindenmeyr, PhD, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships Open Book Award. Citizen Countess is the first-ever biography of Countess Sofia Panina. Dubbed “Russia’s Jane Addams” for her passion for improving the lives of urban workers, she was the first woman in world history to hold a cabinet position and the first political prisoner to face the Bolsheviks’ terrifying revolutionary tribunal. READ MORE

 Marc Gallicchio, PhD, next to the cover of his book Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II

Marc Gallicchio, PhD
Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II

Signed on September 2, 1945, by Japanese and Allied leaders aboard the American battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, the instrument of surrender that formally ended the war in the Pacific ended one of the most cataclysmic engagements in history. In a new book, Unconditional: The Japanese Surrender in World War II, Marc Gallicchio, PhD, professor of History, reveals how the policy of unconditional surrender has shaped our memory and our understanding of World War II. READ MORE

Whitney Martinko, PhD, associate professor of History, next to the cover of her book Historic Real Estate: Market Morality and the Politics of Preservation in the Early United States

Whitney Martinko, PhD
Historic Real Estate: Market Morality and the Politics of Preservation in the Early United States

Long before historic preservation existed as we know it today, Americans struggled to define architectural preservation as one way to work out the relationship between public good and private profit. Now a new book, Historic Real Estate: Market Morality and the Politics of Preservation in the Early United States by Whitney Martinko, PhD, associate professor of History, offers a detailed study of early historic preservation efforts in the US between the 1780s and the 1850s. READ MORE

History Professor Judith Giesberg, PhD, next to the cover of her book Women and the American Civil War

Judith Giesberg, PhD
Women and the American Civil War

In their new book, Women and the American Civil War, Villanova University History Professor Judith Giesberg, PhD, and co-editor Randall Miller, PhD, professor of history at Saint Joseph’s University, examine the intersections of women’s history and the Civil War through a series of paired essays on comparable experiences for women across race, class and geographic location. These eight topics include: politics, wartime mobilization, emancipation, wartime relief, families, religion, Reconstruction and memory. READ MORE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest Provides Funding for Students’ Summer Internships with Partner Historical Organizations

Villanova University’s Albert Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest launched a new program to help Villanova students interested in the field of history take advantage of summer professional work opportunities in settings and organizations that support history in the public interest.

      

THE ROOTED PROJECT

The Rooted Project logo

The Rooted Project aims to explore Villanova University’s past to come to terms with histories of slavery, segregation, institutionalized racism, and gender and religious prejudice. Since 2020, a team of researchers has been working to produce a history of Villanova that situates the university’s founding in fact, that recognizes the significance of diverse nineteenth- and twentieth-century people to the university’s success, and that considers the consequences of university decisions on communities of color and other marginalized groups. This new history aims to give all students, prospective students, and alumni at Villanova a sense of place and belonging. LEARN MORE

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