Current Courses

You will need to leave time for one SSLC approved course, 1 4th hour and service.

  • Fourth hour times: 1 hour 15 minutes Monday 3pm (2 sections), Monday 4:30pm, Tuesday 2:30 pm ,4:00 pm and 6:00 pm, Wednesday 3pm and 4:30-Thursday 10pm, 1pm and 2:30pm- Friday 11:30, 12:30 and 1:30pm register for fourth hour during your registration time.
  • Service times:  Generally 8-11:20, 2:30-6. 3-6:30 Mon. through Friday. 10-2 on Saturday or Sunday 11-3

 

Spring 19 Courses Approved for Pre-Registration

ETH 2050 - 019 The Good Life: Eth & Cont Prob CRN: 32406  Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm   

Major Western ethical traditions as they apply to selected contemporary ethical problems, with special consideration to Jewish and Christian perspectives.

CRM 3001 - 001 Justice and Society CRN: 31991 Days: MWF from 09:30 am to 10:20 am  Instructors: Thomas M. Arvanites

This course presents an overview of the criminal justice system. It focuses on the nature, operation and critical issues of law enforcement, the courts and corrections.

 

 

CRM 4000 - 001 TOP: Delinquency Prevention CRN: 31994  Days: MWF from 09:30 am to 10:20 am 7 SSLC students
Instructors: Allison Ann Payne    Meaning and scope of delinquency; delinquency theories, role of social institutions and social agencies; prevention, control and treatment programs

EDU 3264 - 001 Intro to Disability Studies CRN: 32231   Days: MW  1:30-2:45 pm Christa Bialka  7 SSLC students.

Social, political, cultural and academic implications of disability; legacy of disability in the US and abroad; strategies for working with individuals with special needs. Service learning is required.  SSLC students must sign up for LEVEL or SPO Athletics to pre-register for this course.

 

EDU 2202 – 001  Social Foundations   CRN 32224  TR 4-5:15  Fr. Stephen Baker  5 SSLC students:

Development of public and private education in America in its social and philosophical context; types of education, governmental activity in education, educational finance, religious and political influences, impact of European developments.   Core Social Science, Diversity Requirement 1, Service Learning

ENG 2045 - 001 TOP:Teaching English 2nd Lang CRN: 32349   Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Karyn L. Hollis  5 sslc

This service learning course will provide students with the background, tools, and experience they need to teach English to non-native speakers abroad or in the United States.  Students will learn techniques for teaching speaking, reading, writing, and listening to individuals and groups of varying ages and abilities. We will also cover such topics as materials development, second language acquisition, and the multicultural classroom. . On Tuesdays (4-5:15) students will have class at Villanova. On Thursdays we will tutor Hispanic students in English at CCATE, a community organization in Norristown, PA.  We will take the train from Villanova to Norristown on Thursdays and tutor at CCATE from 4:15-6:00 pm.  Students may email Dr. Hollis at Karyn.hollis@villanova.edu with any questions.   This course counts toward the minor/concentration in Writing and Rhetoric and also counts toward the Education program.

PJ 5000-002 History of Resistance Movements   T/Th 11:30-12:45   Stephanie Sena 5-7 students?? Waiting for approval  for pre registration

Course DescriptionThe History of Resistance Movements will offer an examination of the major movements to resist state violence and oppression in history, how they have changed over time, what ground they have won, and what we can learn from these movements. Students will also study how these liberation struggles have influenced governments and policies. It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for understanding the root causes of global resistance movements, and both the similarities and peculiarities of these various movements. In what ways are these movements interconnected and in what ways are they uniquely local? We will be examining issues surrounding resistance movements, specifically: poverty, war, and colonialism. There will be exploration of current resistance efforts, specifically issues pertinent to black feminism, intersectionality, and prison abolitionism. The course will empower students to advocate for sustainable changes which can improve our world and create a more just and equitable society. ATTRIBUTES: History, ETEP, Diversity 1.

PJ 2800 - 001 Race, Class, & Gender CRN: 33217  Days: MW from 04:30 pm to 05:45 pm 
Instructors: Jasmine T Wallace (7 SSLC students)

A critical examination of the social constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in U.S. culture and the injustices and inequalities that arise from them. Strategies, policies, and procedures for change are also examined.

 

PJ 2800 - H01 HON: Race Class & Gender CRN: 33218  Days: TR from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm Location: TBA 
Instructors: Carol W. Anthony  (7 SSLC students)

A critical examination of the social constructions of race, class, gender, and sexuality in U.S. culture and the injustices and inequalities that arise from them. Strategies, policies, and procedures for change are also examined.

 

PJ 5000 - 001 TOP: Theology and Ethics & Criminal Justice CRN: 33222  Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm Instructors: Kathryn Getek Soltis  (11 SSLC students)   Service at Prison is available with this course

What is true justice and to what extent does our criminal justice system implement it? This course engages Scripture, theology, and ethical theories of justice and punishment in order to examine the realities of criminal justice in America. Ultimately, how might theological and ethical approaches to justice inform (and reform) our courts and prisons?

 

PJ 5500 - 001 Politics of Whiteness CRN: 33226   Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm Location: TBA   7 SSLC students
Instructors: Carol W. Anthony   Examination of scholarship addressing the structure, function, & manifestations of "whiteness," primarily in U.S. culture, & its relationship to issues of diversity. Topics also include white supremacy, white identity, & the future of critical white studies.

 

PJ 5000 - 003 TOP: Nonviolence in America CRN: 33224   Days: TR from 01:00 pm to 02:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Guy Aiken  7  SSLCstudents (waiting for approval for pre-registration)

Justice & discrimination in U.S. society from social, economic, political & ethical perspectives. Strategies for the just elimination of discrimination. Topics include civil rights, gender issues of justice, etc.

PSC 3140 - 001 Race, Ethnicity & Politics in U.S. CRN: 33255   Days: MWF from 11:30 am to 12:20 pm 5 SLC students
Instructors: Camille Burge  The importance of race and ethnicity in American politics, and the politics (historical, legal, attitudinal, and behavioral) of four of the United States' principal racial and ethnic minority groups-blacks (African-Americans), Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans.

SOC 2200 - 001 Sociology of Deviance CRN: 33392  Days: MWF from 08:30 am to 09:20 am 7 SSLC students
Instructors: Thomas M. Arvanites  A sociological examination of rule-breaking behavior; causal theories of deviance; types of deviance and their distribution in contemporary society.  Students may serve at Prison if in this course.

 

SOC 4000 - 001 TOP: Critical Race Theory CRN: 33399   Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm   5 SSLC students? Pre registration?  Instructors: Glenn E. Bracey    Description not available

Topics addressing special or emerging interests, chosen for their current importance and the specific expertise of an instructor.

THL 3740 - 001 Liberation Theologies CRN: 33528  Days: TR from 08:30 am to 09:45 am Location: TBA
Instructors: Arthur Purcaro   8 SSLC students

Peace & Justice This course is designed for students in the Service Learning Community. Fr. Art is an Augustinian who served with the poorest of the poor in Peru for 30 years. He brings a wealth of experience and love for the poor to this course. Liberation Theology calls us to see how the poor are marginalized by society, describes how to work among them in order to advocate on their behalf, and most importantly to use what we have in order for the poor to find their power so they can advocate for themselves. Liberation Theology proposes that Christ desires to free our fellow human beings from the social structures that keep them impoverished. St Augustine stated: You give bread to a hungry person; but it would be better were no one hungry, and you could give it to no one. (Tractate 1 John 8,8) This course will examine the role of Charity and the pursuit of Justice, as well as how we think about and work with and for the poor.

 

 

THL 5000 - 003 THM:Do Black Lives Matter to God? CRN: 33540  Days: MW from 04:30 pm to 05:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Naomi C. Washington Leapheart  7 SLC students  Peace and Justice Has God sanctioned #BlackLivesMatter? Would Jesus protest the killings of Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Rekia Boyd, or Aiyana Stanley-Jones? How should people of Christian faith respond to Black protest? In this course, we will attempt to construct a Divine argument - 13 - for resistance to racialized violence and oppression. To do this, we will engage the biblical text and the texts of historical narrative, literature, poetry, music, visual art, and film to explore key theological topics, including sin, suffering, and salvation. As we center the perspectives of Black, womanist, mujerista, queer, and Native theologians, scholars, organizers, artists, and activists, we will seek to discover a theological framework for the contemporary Movement for Black Lives. Ultimately, we will seek to be empowered by this framework, integrating it with our own faith and practice in order to live into the prophetic call to do justice.

 

 

PJ 4000 - 001 TOP:The Nature of Genocide CRN: 33221 Enrollment: Timothy J. Horner MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15  10 SSLC students

tracing the causes of genocide through their historical, sociological, political, neurological, colonial, and religious roots. This course seeks to understand perpetrators and the societies that allow, even encourage, the act of genocide. This is a multimedia, multi-disciplinary course that uses primary sources of the genocides in Rwanda, North America, Ottoman Turkey, Nazi Germany, and the former Yugoslavia. Understanding the mind of the perpetrator is difficult and morally challenging. The larger goal of the course is to find ways to prevent genocide... Understanding perpetrators and our own human nature is of vital importance if we are to be proactive members of the world community who can smell smoke before there is fire. In this sense, this is not so much a course about genocides as it is about The Nature of Genocide.  ATTRIBUTES: THL, CTHL, DIV 3  **** SSLC students do not need to have to fulfill pre-requisite Theology requirements

Spring 19 Courses Approved for SSLC with no Pre-Registration

If you are going to register for one of the courses listed below, please notifiy Mary.Aiello@Villanova.edu with your selection.

If you are taking a course in which the professor is not aware you are in SSLC please try to direct an assignment or two connecting your service or topics in 4th hour with course content.  You might want to speak with your professor about how you can make that happen.

COM 3201 - 001 Rhetoric & Social Justice CRN: 31915   Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Billie Jean Murray

Examination of public discourse surrounding issues in social justice and human rights. Through traditional and contemporary rhetorical theory, rhetorical strategies are traced through contemporary movements.

 

COM 3304 - 001 Documentary Theory & Practice CRN: 31922   Days: TR from 01:00 pm to 02:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: John A. O'Leary, Matthew F. Marencik, and Stephen T. McWilliams

A study of the documentary as art, propaganda, social document, and instrument for social change. After a review of theory and work in documentary, students develop their own short works. For COM majors who have taken COM 3600, this course counts as a Free Elective. For COM majors who have not taken COM 3600, this course counts as a COM 3000-level course.

 

COM 3304 - 100 Documentary Theory & Practice CRN: 31923   Days: R from 06:10 pm to 08:50 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Hezekiah Leon Lewis

A study of the documentary as art, propaganda, social document, and instrument for social change. After a review of theory and work in documentary, students develop their own short works. For COM majors who have taken COM 3600, this course counts as a Free Elective. For COM majors who have not taken COM 3600, this course counts as a COM 3000-level course.

 

COM 3448 - 100 Multicultural Leadership & Dialogue CRN: 31936   Days: W from 04:30 pm to 07:30 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Sheryl P. Bowen Introduces scholarship addressing injustice and misunderstanding in America. Students will develop a dialogic perspective and a set of skills as one means of transforming themselves and their community. Must also participate in a one-credit COM 5300 topically focused dialogue group. Requires permission of chairperson.

 

CRM 3700 - 001 White Collar Crime CRN: 31993   Days: TR from 01:00 pm to 02:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Steven L. Chanenson

White collar crimes are committed by professionals for the benefit of individuals or organizations. This course examines the nature and magnitude (cost in dollars and lives) of white collar crime. Sociological theories explaining the commission of "crime in the suites" and society's response will be discussed.

 

CRM 4000 - 002  Race, Crime and Justice CRN: 31995  Days: TR from 10:00 am to 11:15 am Location: TBA
Instructors: Kelly A. Welch

This course investigates special topics or emerging issues within criminology. Topics are selected for their importance or the expertise of the instructor.

EDU 3263 - 001 Diversity and Inclusion CRN: 32230   Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm 

Introduction to the physical and social characteristics of diverse and exceptional students between 3 and 21. Issues of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, and special education with respect to schools and in light of recent legislation and court decisions. Problem cases with an emphasis on the underprivileged, antisocial, and disadvantaged.

ENG 1975 - 002 CoreSem Borders Migrations IDs CRN: 32318   Days: MWF from 08:30 am to 09:20 am Location: TBA
Instructors: Rena Potok

Careful reading of and intensive writing about literature. Individual sections vary in themes and works covered. Restricted to Arts & Sciences students governed by the New Core Curriculum instituted in Fall 2011.

 

ENG 1975 - 005 CoreSem: American Dream CRN: 32321  Days: TR from 08:30 am to 09:45 am Location: TBA
Instructors: Robert James O'Neil

Careful reading of and intensive writing about literature. Individual sections vary in themes and works covered. Restricted to Arts & Sciences students governed by the New Core Curriculum instituted in Fall 2011.

 

ENG 1975 - 011 CoreSem: Identity & Difference CRN: 32327   Days: TR from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Ellen Bonds

Careful reading of and intensive writing about literature. Individual sections vary in themes and works covered. Restricted to Arts & Sciences students governed by the New Core Curriculum instituted in Fall 2011.

 

 

ENG 2003 - 1 Writing Thru Conflict: Belfast CRN: 32342 Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm Syllabus Available

Explore the important role of creative writing in confronting, protesting, and engaging with socio--political conflicts.

The goals of this course are to study the work of established American, Irish, and other international authors who

 focus their creative eye on socio--political conflicts in their many forms, from poverty and racism to war and atrocity,

and use these models as guides for the student's own original creative writing. In this course students will examine the

lens through which established writers view these conflicts, will analyze the elements of craft employed by those authors and poets, and use similar techniques in their own creative writing. Among the writers we will study are: Seamus Heaney, Owen McCafferty, Claudia Rankine, Ta--Nehisi Coates, Yiyun Li, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Time in class will be divided between the discussion of readings, lessons concerning craft, directed writing exercises, and the workshopping of student work. This is not a lecture course, but rather a participatory experience that is essential to the success of the class. Regular attendance and active engagement is required.

As part of this course, students will have the opportunity to travel to Belfast, Ireland over Villanova's Spring Break to participate in an intensive creative writing conference. The students will have the opportunity to participate in writing workshops, readings, and symposiums at Queens University. Co--sponsored by Villanova's Program in Creative Writing and the Center for Irish Studies, and in conjunction with the Seamus Heaney Center at Queens University, this exchange will have a particular focus on exploring the legacy of The Troubles in Northern Ireland. Over a seven day period, students will engage in daily writing workshops with both Irish and American authors, take literary tours in Belfast, attend readings and creative writing symposiums in the evenings, and revise and share their work in a student showcase on the final night of the exchange.  *There is a cost associated with the travel to Belfast. Please contact Professor Alan Drew (alan.drew@villanova.edu)

 for more information.

HIS 1155 - 002 TOP:US Black Freedom Movement CRN: 32548   Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Shannen Dee Williams Selected core courses offering transnational perspectives on the development of American society.

 

HIS 2292 - 001 African American History His since Emancipation CRN: 32563   Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm Location: TBA  Instructors: Shannen Dee Williams

Themes of resistance and creativity with the development of the African-American communities in the era following the Civil War. Reconstruction, Northern migration, Jim Crow and segregation, and protest thought and Civil Rights.

HUM 2900 - 001 TOP:Jews,Christians,Muslims CRN: 32608   Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Anna Bonta Moreland

Learn about why Christians can call Jews and Muslims “cousins,” since we are all the children of Abraham. We will examine these deep familial relationships through the disciplines of theology, philosophy, and history.

PJ 2700 - H01 HON:Peacemakers & Peacemaking CRN: 33216  Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm
Instructors: Eugene B. McCarraher   “Give peace a chance” is a plea that has gone sadly unheeded over the ages. In this course, we examine the nature of peace—and war—and why peace has been so difficult to make and sustain.

 

 

PHI 2450 - 100 Catholic Social Thought CRN: 33139 Days: W from 06:10 pm to 08:50 pm Theodore W. Nunez  Catholic Social Thought from Rerum Navarum to the present. Its Aristotelean-Thomistic grounding. The Church's challenge to analyses of contemporary social, political, and economic systems. Core Theology, Public Policy & Ethics 

PSC 4275 - 001 TOP: Refugees/Displaced Persons CRN: 33260   Days: MWF from 12:30 pm to 01:20 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Shigehiro Suzuki        Topical courses in International Relations offered on occasional basis.

SOC 3500 - 001 Sociology of Gender CRN: 33396   Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Melissa Hodges

Sex roles examined from a social learning and developmental perspective; recent changes in related attitudes and behaviors, consequences for interpersonal relationships and societal organization.

 

SOC 3600 - 001 Race & Ethnic Relations CRN: 33397  Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Rory Kramer

Development of race and ethnic relationships in America; the impact of power-conflict relations on race and ethnic patterns; particular attention given to development from early 1950's to present.

 

SOC 3600 - 002 Race & Ethnic Relations CRN: 33398  Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Rory Kramer

 Development of race and ethnic relationships in America; the impact of power-conflict relations on race and ethnic patterns; particular attention given to development from early 1950's to present.

 

SOC 5050 - 001 Soc Theory & Public Policy CRN: 33403   Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Glenn E. Bracey

Influence of sociological ideas on social policies. Students will be expected to design a theoretically driven empirical study which impacts on some public policy.

THL 5000 - 004 THM: Made in God's Image, Today CRN: 33541   Days: MW from 04:30 pm to 05:45 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Esteban A. Hernandez    

 How much humanity we grant to others shapes the societies we create and the environments we live in. In a color-conscious world, we understand assigning equal measures of humanity to those that strike us as different as a primary step to creating a more just world. Imparting humanity allows us to guarantee common rights and equality of opportunity and access. But what do we mean by humanity? Does the teaching of the imago Dei, the image of God, provide us with the lens we need to navigate our divided political world in the era of rising populism and divisiveness? Do we have a consequent responsibility to attempt to hear, reconcile with, and understand others? Could the image of God inform dialogue about sexual objectification, health and well-being, rewards for human labor, and treatment of refugees and migrants? Students will explore sensitive issues, often of their own choosing and possibly within their own fields of study, striking at the heart of the claim by exploring scriptural, theological and sociological resources. Class conversation will also be guided, and occasionally challenged by, scientific insights particularly in anthropology and biology as well as theological tradition and the news of the day

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What is Service Learning Community

Service: You will mentor a child or teen, tutor in classroom and after school programs, teach adult literacy, teach in local high schools, and teach Peer Mediation to elementary school children or high school students for 3-4 hours per week.

There are soup kitchen and homeless shelter service sites available.

Learning: You are required to take one course fall and spring semester that are designated for the Sophomore Service Learning Community. You are also required to register for a 1 credit integrating seminar.

Community: You will live with students who share values and desire to serve the poor and examine the causes and structures in society which keep people poor. You will enjoy Community nights, evenings of reflection celebration dinners, orientation in August and January and day of service in September and opportunities to choose some weekends of service.