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Current Courses

You will need to leave time for one SSLC approved course, 1 4th hour and service.

  • Fourth hour times: 1 hour 15 minutes Monday 3pm  Monday 4:30pm, Tuesday 2:30 pm ,4:00 pm , Wednesday 3pm and 4:30-Thursday 10pm, 1pm and 2:30pm- Friday 11:30 and 12:30 pm.  (register for fourth hour during your registration time.)
  • Service times:  Generally 8-11:20, 2:30-6. 3-6:30 Mon. through Friday. 10-2 on Saturday or Sunday 11-3   

 

Fall 21 Courses Approved for Pre-Registration

 

EDU 3263 001 Diversity and Inclusion M/W/F 10:30 - 11:20 am Rachel SkrlacLo  Introduction to the physical and social characteristics of diverse and exceptional students between 3 and 21. Issues of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, and special education with respect to schools and considering recent legislation and court decisions. Problem cases with an emphasis on the underprivileged, antisocial, and disadvantaged.



 


 Ethics 2050 005 The Good Life MWF 10:30 - 11:45 Kristyn Sessions  All students in this course are SSLC #25

The discipline of ethics, part art and part science, is an inquiry into fundamental questions about human existence: what it means to do good, live well, love rightly.  It is, above all, an examination of who we are, what we value, and how we come to share our lives with others.  This course will progress into making connections with your service site and questions about how others opportunity for the good life is influences by their identity, ability or social status  **Prerequisites for Arts and Sciences  and VSB students:  ACS 1000 and 1001,THL 1000 and PHI 1000.  The Theology or Philosophy can be taken at the same time as ETH 2050.  *Prerequisites for ETH 2050 are NOT required for Engineering or Nursing Students


 

PJ 5000 003 History of Homelessness T/R 10:00 -11:15 Stephanie Sena (5-7 SLC students) The History of Homelessness will offer an examination of the diverse societal perceptions of homelessness and poverty, and how those perceptions have shifted over time. Students will also study changes in government policy and how changing policy has affected people experiencing homelessness.  It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for understanding the root causes of the expansion of homelessness in the U.S., and to convey a sense of the experience of homelessness and its consequences. There will be exploration of the current efforts to meet the immediate needs of the homeless. The course will empower students to advocate for sustainable changes which can prevent homelessness. Housing Unit of Philadelphia.  students must plan to choose a site that engages with a site that serves the population dealing with homelessness or food insecurity-Hub of Hope, Broad Street Ministries--Face to Face or potential site associated with this course.


Peace & Justice (P&J courses have attributes in other disciplines. Check Novasis)

 

 

PJ 2500 001 Education and Social Justice T/R  2:30-3:45   Carol Anthony (7  SLC students)  This course will survey the landscape of education in the U.S., both public and private, and critically evaluate its strengths and weaknesses through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching.  We will explore how the content, context, and structure of education in the U.S. serves to perpetuate and intensify inequalities of race, class, and gender in such a diverse culture, and we will address the impact of technology and corporate sponsorship on the “goal” of education. (Core Social Science, Diversity 1)  

 PJ 2800-001: Race, Class, and Gender  - T/R 11:30 - 12:45 Carol Anthony        (5 SSLC student)  PJ 2800-002:  Race, Class, and Gender  - T/R 1:00 - 2:15   Ariella Robbins      (5 SSLC students)

 What is oppression? Do our public policies and current legislation suggest that it is a crime to be poor? What is structural racism? Does one’s socio-economic location and embodied difference (whether gendered or raced) really matter, or are one’s life chances and opportunities merely a matter of “individual responsibility” and “hard-work”?

 

 

History

PJ 5000 003 History of Homelessness T/R 10:00 -11:15 Stephanie Sena (5-7 SLC students) The History of Homelessness will offer an examination of the diverse societal perceptions of homelessness and poverty, and how those perceptions have shifted over time. Students will also study changes in government policy and how changing policy has affected people experiencing homelessness.  It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for understanding the root causes of the expansion of homelessness in the U.S., and to convey a sense of the experience of homelessness and its consequences. There will be exploration of the current efforts to meet the immediate needs of the homeless. The course will empower students to advocate for sustainable changes which can prevent homelessness. Housing Unit of Philadelphia.  students must plan to choose a site that engages with a site that serves the population dealing with homelessness or food insecurity-Hub of Hope, Broad Street Ministries--Face to Face or potential site associated with this course.


 

 

Upper-Level Theology-and Peace and Justice

-prerequisites waived for thematic courses related to Justice for SSLC students

 PJ 4000 001 Nature of Genocide  M/W 3:00 - 4:15  Timothy Horner     (10-12  SLC students) Genocide is perhaps the darkest of all human endeavors. This course is an attempt to shine an analytical light onto this modern phenomenon by tracing the causes of genocide through their historical, sociological, political, neurological, colonial, and religious roots. This course seeks to understand perpetrators and uses primary sources of the genocides in Rwanda, North America, Ottoman Turkey, Nazi Germany, and the former Yugoslavia. Understanding the mind of the perpetrator is difficult and morally challenging - understanding can sometimes lead to uncomfortable empathy - but the larger goal of the course is to find ways to prevent genocide, not just stop it when it starts.  Cross listed with Theology.  Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.

 

PJ 5000-001 *Theology Ethics and Criminal Justice M/W  1:30-2:45pm  Kathryn Getek Soltis (7 SLC students)  What is true justice and to what extent does our criminal justice system implement it? This course engages Scripture, theology, and ethical theories of justice and punishment in order to examine the realities of criminal justice in America. Ultimately, how might theological and ethical approaches to justice inform (and reform) our courts and prisons? THL, CTHL and CST Core Theology          Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.

 

PJ 5000 004 Agitating for Justice   T/R 4:00 - 5:15 pm Naomi Leaphart (5-7  SLC students)  In movement-building work, to agitate is to hold individuals and institutions accountable to our highest values and noblest aspirations. How can we agitate Christian theologies, re-reading the Jesus tradition for communal liberation? How can Christian theologies agitate society, supporting public action for social and political change? The phrase "faith-rooted" describes a style of organizing and action work that is shaped and guided in every way by faith principles and practices. In this course, through readings, lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and written reflections, and a group project, we will explore faith-rooted community organizing as a response to social injustice, throughout history and today. We will examine how students and people of color, grounded in faith, have mobilized successful campaigns to redistribute power and resources to those who have been denied access.  Theology Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.


 

THL 3000-001 Pathways to Sustainable Living  W 6:10pm-8:50pm   Rev Art Purcaro OSA   (7 SLC)   1 credit course you can combine with one IGR course(s) to fulfill SSLC requirement.

 This course presents Catholic Social Teaching on the environment, centering on Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato Si, “On Care for our Common Home”.   We will treat the Sustainable Development Goals identified by the community of nations and how achieving them depends highly on an ethos.

 


 PJ 4000 001 Nature of Genocide  M/W 3:00 - 4:15  Timothy Horner     (10-12  SLC students) Genocide is perhaps the darkest of all human endeavors. This course is an attempt to shine an analytical light onto this modern phenomenon by tracing the causes of genocide through their historical, sociological, political, neurological, colonial, and religious roots. This course seeks to understand perpetrators and uses primary sources of the genocides in Rwanda, North America, Ottoman Turkey, Nazi Germany, and the former Yugoslavia. Understanding the mind of the perpetrator is difficult and morally challenging - understanding can sometimes lead to uncomfortable empathy - but the larger goal of the course is to find ways to prevent genocide, not just stop it when it starts.  Cross listed with Theology.  Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.

 

PJ 5000-001 *Theology Ethics and Criminal Justice M/W  1:30-2:45pm  Kathryn Getek Soltis (7 SLC students)  What is true justice and to what extent does our criminal justice system implement it? This course engages Scripture, theology, and ethical theories of justice and punishment in order to examine the realities of criminal justice in America. Ultimately, how might theological and ethical approaches to justice inform (and reform) our courts and prisons? THL, CTHL and CST Core Theology          Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.

 

PJ 5000 004 Agitating for Justice   T/R 4:00 - 5:15 pm Naomi Leaphart (5-7  SLC students)  In movement-building work, to agitate is to hold individuals and institutions accountable to our highest values and noblest aspirations. How can we agitate Christian theologies, re-reading the Jesus tradition for communal liberation? How can Christian theologies agitate society, supporting public action for social and political change? The phrase "faith-rooted" describes a style of organizing and action work that is shaped and guided in every way by faith principles and practices. In this course, through readings, lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and written reflections, and a group project, we will explore faith-rooted community organizing as a response to social injustice, throughout history and today. We will examine how students and people of color, grounded in faith, have mobilized successful campaigns to redistribute power and resources to those who have been denied access.  Theology Prerequisites listed in Novasis are waived for SSLC students taking themed Upper-Level Theology courses.



Courses Approved for SSLC - Sign up not available through OSL

If you are going to register for one of the courses listed below, please notify Mary.Aiello@Villanova.edu with your selection.

If you are taking a course in which the professor is not aware you are in SSLC please try to direct an assignment or two connecting your service or topics in 4th hour with course content.  You might want to speak with your professor about how you can make that happen.

COMMUNICATIONS  (you may combine 2 IGR sections and 1 credit course relevant to service to fulfill requirement

COM 5300 - 100 IGR:Dialogue (see website for IGR courses-they are not published at this time)

Permission of Director required; Students must complete application at www.villanova.edu/igr and attend all classes; students will be assigned to topical dialogues on gender, racial identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and ability; SSLC Students may take 2 IGR courses to fulfill SLC requirement.  http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/provost/diversity/igr.html


 

EDU 3277 001 Urban Education   TR 2:30-3:45.  New faculty.

Need description--new course   This course has focused on inequities in Education In under-served communities. The content and description will be available when the new faculty member begins his/her work at Villanova.


 

HIS 1075-DL1 Topic: Significance of Race in America T R 10-11:15. Dr. Angelo Repousis Why were relations between History Native Americans and whites violent almost from the beginning of European settlement? How could slavery thrive in a society founded on the principle that "all men are created equal"? How comparable were the experiences of Irish, Jewish, and Italian immigrants, and why did people in the early 20th century think of them as separate "races"? What were the causes and consequences of Japanese Americans' internment in military camps during World War II? Are today's Mexican immigrants unique, or do they have something in common with earlier immigrants? This course deals centrally with the social process by which societies create racial and ethnic groups and define their place in relation to other racial or ethnic groups. Because the emergence of racial and ethnic groups is a historical process, the course will examine American history from the colonial period to the present in order to understand the changing ways that Americans have viewed each other and divided into groups. In short, the course will be rooted in specific processes in American history but will examine how America formed groups that are given power and prestige recognized as "real" Americans, discriminated against, marginalized, enslaved, or killed



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Office of Service Learning

Noreen Cameron, M.S., Director
Mary Aiello, Administrative Assistant

610-519-4602
SAC 386