Campus Ministry

About Campus Ministry

Campus Ministry nourishes the development of religious faith and practice at Villanova University. While affirming the individual, Campus Ministry seeks to empower the community to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Campus Ministry respects the religious traditions of the many while expressing the identity and mission of a Catholic University.

Reflecting traditions of Roman Catholic and Augustinian spirituality, Campus Ministry engages in every aspect of University life through prayer, liturgy, community service, and pastoral care. Campus Ministry encourages all to integrate personal faith into the academic and social environment of the University. Campus Ministry promotes the Augustinian ideal of an intellectual community seeking both wisdom and a fuller spiritual life.

Campus Ministry fosters the development of leadership in service to the poor and education for justice. Campus Ministry programs reflect the model of St. Thomas of Villanova who dedicated his life in service to the poor. Campus Ministry articulates and strengthens the commitment of the University to both the Gospel and the world.

Events

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Campus Ministry Social Media

Sunday Mass
7:30AM, 10:30AM
5:30PM, 7 & 9PM
St. Thomas of Villanova Church

Saturday Vigil Mass
5:30PM
Corr Chapel

Daily Mass (Mon–Fri)
12:05 & 5:30PM
Corr Chapel  

Spanish Mass
1PM—Sundays
Corr Chapel  

Sacrament of Reconciliation
3:30–4:30PM—Tuesdays & Wednesdays
St. Thomas of Villanova Church  

St. Thomas of Villanova Parish Schedule

 

[610] 519–4080
[610] 519–6020 (fax)
cmcommunication@villanova.edu

St. Rita Hall
800 E. Lancaster Avenue
Villanova, PA 19085

Interested in Getting Involved with Campus Ministry? We offer over 50 programs that are sure to fit every personality and lifestyle!


Service & Volunteering
Retreats
Liturgical Ministry
Music
Faith-Sharing & Support Groups

In the spirit of St. Augustine, who urged his followers to search for God together, consider this reflection on Sunday’s Gospel. Jesus addresses himself to the Pharisees as the Good Shepherd, one who intimately knows each of his sheep by name and they know him. He will even go as far as lay down his own life for his sheep. How comforting it is to know that God is always near to us and will protect us. However, Jesus presents us with a challenge when he goes further to say, “I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. These also I must lead, and they will hear my voice, and there will be one flock, one shepherd.” Jesus is reminding us that we are also called to be shepherds, to reach out and share God’s love with those who find themselves on the outskirts. How can we overcome or let go of our own desires to fit in or be admired and instead reach out and welcome those who find themselves excluded, today?