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Villanova in the Media

Media Highlights from April - June 2021

Stephanie Walkup, PhD—a structural engineering professor at Villanova University—was a guest on CNN providing expertise on the condominium building collapse in Florida. She was also quoted in an Associated Press article and on NPR Weekend Edition
Stephanie Walkup, PhD—a structural engineering professor at Villanova University—was a guest on CNN providing expertise on the condominium building collapse in Florida. She was also quoted in an Associated Press article and on NPR Weekend Edition.

Villanova’s distinctive academic programs, world-class faculty, cutting-edge research and high-achieving students place the University in the national media spotlight. Below is a sampling of media highlights from April-June 2021.

Before building collapse, $9 million in repairs needed

Associated Press (Professor Walkup also appeared on CNN: Click here to view segment)

Stephanie Walkup, an engineering professor at Villanova University, said it will take time to pinpoint the cause — or series of causes — that brought down Champlain Towers South.   

NFL: Brands could flock to Nassib after historic coming out announcement

Reuters

It helps that Nassib is an established NFL player who signed a three-year contract with the Raiders last year. That increased the likelihood that “his inclusion (in an ad) will likely be perceived as sincere and not just a matter of tokenism,” said Charles Taylor, a marketing professor at Villanova School of Business.   

With judicial picks, Biden seeks to address disparity in legal experience of federal judges

CBS News

"The importance of deep-level diversity is by having people who have different backgrounds, life experiences, bringing them all together at the table together, they have different viewpoints so you get more robust discussion," Jason Iuliano, a law professor at Villanova University, told CBS News. "It cuts across political lines as well."   

Joe Biden is Caught in the Middle of a Catholic Church Debate Over Communion

Time Magazine

The vote is another example of the American Catholic Church moving on a more conservative and political path, says Massimo Faggioli, a theology professor at Villanova University and author of Joe Biden and Catholicism in the United States.   

Betelgeuse Merely Burped, Astronomers Conclude

The New York Times

Edward Guinan, of Villanova University, who has followed Betelgeuse intently, was more measured in this enthusiasm.    

Our tornado warning system has come a long way, but it could be better

USA Today

“Those classic scenes of ‘Wizard of Oz’ — of the tornado dancing in the landscape — have now been replaced with the tornado going through these brand-new subdivisions that are less than 10 years old. And that’s that urban sprawl,” said meteorologist and tornado researcher Stephen Strader of Villanova University in Pennsylvania.   

Analysis | The G-7 wants to mobilize new global financing as an alternative to China’s multilateral push

The Washington Post

Over the weekend, President Biden and other Group of 7 leaders announced a new Build Back Better World (B3W) partnership to mobilize hundreds of billions of dollars toward infrastructure and other development projects. … Christopher Kilby is a professor of economics at Villanova University. Ayse Kaya and Jonathan Kay also served as co-authors on this article.   

ProPublica's report on tax inequality could hurt Biden's push to make the system better

NBC News

This week, ProPublica published a treasure trove of information on the financial lives of some of our wealthiest citizens. ...Leslie Book is a professor of law at Villanova University.   

‘High-tech, high-touch’: A career center serving students well

University Business Magazine

During the fall of 2019, renovations to the Career Center at Villanova University forced staff and students to operate semi-virtually, quite a change from the typical, bustling face-to-face office environment.   

Predictive analytics are only as useful as the university culture around them

EdScoop

The ability to quantitatively predict future success isn’t new or emerging, even within the higher education space, said Randy Weinstein, the vice provost for teaching and learning at Villanova University.   

The US investigation into COVID-19 origins

The Associated Press

“Questions of origins andquestions of disease control are not the same thing once human-to-human transmission has become common,” said Deborah Seligsohn, an expert in environment and public health at Villanova University.   

The Debate Over Qualified Immunity Is at the Heart of Police Reform. Here’s What to Know

Time Magazine

Teri Ravenell, the associate dean for facility research and development at Villanova University School of Law, also points out the misconception that qualified immunity impacts a variety of legal situations; in fact, only applies in these civil lawsuits.      

Positive Leadership: It Makes A Difference

Forbes

Some might say that positivity is something you’re born with and that you are either a positive leader or not. Actually, positivity is a skill that requires work each and every day. Joyce Russell is Dean of the Villanova School of Business.   

When Musk Tweets About Crypto, It's Eloncoin All the Way Down

WIRED

“He had to know that this was going to be viewed in a negative light,” says John Sedunov, a professor of finance at Villanova University, about Musk’s Tesla announcement.   

'Grief must be witnessed': Joe Biden's first 100 days as consoler-in-chief

NBC News

It's an ability only someone with Biden's story could have, said Massimo Faggioli, a professor of theology at Villanova University, who wrote a spiritual biography of Biden's Catholic faith published in January.   

CIA head said to have made unannounced trip to Afghanistan

The Associated Press

David Barrett, a professor at Villanova University who specializes in the history of intelligence policy, said the troop pullout will reduce the amount of intelligence gathered by the military and ultimately provided to the CIA. 

Derek Chauvin Found Guilty on All Charges

MSNBC

Joining us now is Villanova University Professor of Law, Teri Ravenell. Can you explain to us what this verdict for Derek Chauvin means in the context of what we may see in the future in terms of these cases? Ravenell: “One of the things that we have to think about whenever we think about this sort of incident with police violence. We need to think about it under the criminal level and the civil level.”   

Lots of Jobs Await the Class of 2021. So Does Plenty of Competition.

The Wall Street Journal

One new graduate who is taking that advice is Keeley Scott, a senior marketing major at Villanova University, who wants to pursue a career in fashion and beauty.   

How World War I Fueled the Russian Revolution

History Channel

The antiquated czarist regime’s determination to hang onto power hindered modernization efforts, as a result, “the Russian Empire trailed behind the rest of Europe in terms of economic and industrial strength,” says Lynne Hartnett, an associate professor of history at Villanova University and an expert on the Russian Revolution.   

CIA head said to have made unannounced trip to Afghanistan

The Associated Press

David Barrett, a professor at Villanova University who specializes in the history of intelligence policy, said the troop pullout will reduce the amount of intelligence gathered by the military and ultimately provided to the CIA.  

Derek Chauvin Found Guilty on All Charges

MSNBC

Joining us now is Villanova University Professor of Law, Teri Ravenell. Ravenell: “One of the things that we have to think about whenever we think about this sort of incident with police violence. We need to think about it under the criminal level and the civil level.”   

Why toxic workplace cultures follow you home

BBC News

“Destructive behaviours at the top trickle down,” says Manuela Priesemuth, an assistant professor in the management and operations department at Villanova University in Pennsylvania, US, who has researched abusive managers and toxic workplaces.   

The Virus Drove Churchgoers Away. Will Easter Bring Them Back?

The New York Times

Many Christians attend in-person services only on Christmas and Easter. Donations given on those two holidays make up 10 percent of the annual collection for most Catholic parishes, said Matthew Manion, the director for the Center for Church Management at Villanova University.