Course Listings

Fall 2017 Subcatalog

23092 PJ 2500-001 EDUCATION & SOCIAL JUSTICE                                       
TR 1:00-2:15 Anthony                                                                                                                                 

This course will survey the landscape of education in the U.S., both public and private, and critically evaluate its strengths and weaknesses through the lens of Catholic Social Teaching.  We will explore how the content, context, and structure of education in the U.S. serves to perpetuate and intensify inequalities of race, class, and gender in such a diverse culture, and we will address the impact of technology and corporate sponsorship on the “goal” of education.    In light of this and in keeping with the tenets of Catholic Social Teaching’s emphasis on those most disadvantaged and devalued in society, we will also explore scholarship that addresses the potential of education to liberate people from such modal inequalities and injustices for whatever might be meant by “full human flourishing,” and to transform ourselves into a more equitable social democracy.
ATTRIBUTES: Ethics Concentration:Economics and Public Policy elective, Diversity 1.

23093 PJ 2700-H01 PEACEMAKERS & PEACEMAKING                        
MW 4:30-5:45 McCarraher

Classical and contemporary examples and approaches to peacemaking in response to injustice and social conflict. Issues to be considered include the nature and significance of nonviolent struggle, political reconciliation, and the role of religion in shaping moral action for social change.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Ethics Concentration: Politics, and Law elective, Honors,
Humanities. Non-Honors students with a minimum 3.33 GPA are eligible for this course and should
contact the director, kathryn.geteksoltis@villanova.edu.

23094 PJ 2800-100 RACE, CLASS, & GENDER                                                               
T 6:10-8:50 Dwyer

This course concerns a critical analysis of the inequalities that exist in the U.S. as a function of differences based on one’s race, one’s sex, and one’s class.  We will read contemporary authors from different cultures and different disciplines as they describe, historicize, analyze, and offer possible remedies for those experiences, practices, policies, and conceptual structures that can separate and divide us one from another.  As a Peace and Justice course at an Augustinian University, this course is keeps in mind Augustinian idea that we are people living together in a community united by our hearts and minds. Furthermore, there is an underlying understanding that we are expected to search for wisdom by remaining open, responsible, and respectful of all points of view. This means that we will be looking at the ways we understand and organize ourselves, but from the perspective of those most vulnerable to systems of power that serve to deny and/or devalue them.
ATTRIBUTES: Africana studies minor/concentration, Cultural Studies, Ethics Concentration:Economics and Public Policy elective, Gender & Women’s Studies, Philosophy, Diversity 1 & 2.

23095 PJ 2900-001 ETHICAL ISSUES IN PEACE & JUSTICE                                
TR 2:30-3:45 Stehl

This course will introduce and examine the economic, political, and social roots of contemporary moral issues, with special emphasis on the Catholic Christian perspective. The course will survey issues like poverty, globalization, violence, conflict, and human rights. This primary focus will explore: the historical & cultural elements of  environmental exploitation, critiques of fossil fuel dependency & peak oil, the ethics & principles of natural systems and holistic design that go beyond sustainability (permaculture), and the practical alternative approaches toward social, economic, and environmental justice.
ATTRIBUTES: ENV:Environmental Studies, Ethics Concentration:Ethical Issues in Science, Technology, and Environment, Core Theology, Theology.

23096 PJ 2993-001 INTERNSHIP                                                                                    
TBA  Getek Soltis

23097 PJ 2996-001 INTERNSHIP
TBA  Getek Soltis

23098 PJ 4000-001 THE NATURE OF GENOCIDE
TR 4:00-5:15  Horner

Genocide is perhaps the darkest of all human endeavors.  This course is an attempt to shine an analytical light onto this modern phenomenon by tracing the causes of genocide through their historical, sociological, political, neurological, colonial, and religious roots.  More than simply a parade of atrocity, this course seeks to understand perpetrators and the societies that allow, even encourage, the act of genocide.  This is a multimedia, multi-disciplinary course that uses primary sources of the genocides in Rwanda, North America, Ottoman Turkey, Nazi Germany, and the former Yugoslavia. Definitions of genocide as well as the circumstances that allow it are central to the course.  Understanding the mind of the perpetrator is difficult and morally challenging - understanding can sometimes lead to uncomfortable empathy - but the larger goal of the course is to find ways to prevent genocide, not just stop it when it starts.  Understanding perpetrators and our own human nature is of vital importance if we are to be proactive members of the world community who can smell smoke before there is fire.  In this sense, this is not so much a course about genocides as it is about The Nature of Genocide.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Core Theology,Theology, Diversity 3.

23099 PJ 4000-002 SOCIAL JUSTICE in the HEBREW PROPHETS
MW 3:00-4:15  Horner

This course is an examination of the works of the Hebrew Prophets both in their original contexts and their pertinence to our modern world.  Too often the prophets are only used as predictors of future events and the social message is lost.  This course attempts to recover the original principles of social justice that are embodied in their message.  Each Hebrew prophet is read as an individual voice with particular concerns and approaches that are anchored in the society in which they lived.  The emphasis of the course is on the primary text of the biblical writings.  Supplemental materials are used to show how these issues still apply to the modern world.  Students are asked to both engage in the world of the text as well as their own world.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Core Theology, Theology.

23100 PJ 5000-001 HISTORY OF HOMELESSNESS
TR 11:30-12:45 Sena
The History of Homelessness will offer an examination of the diverse societal perceptions of homelessness and poverty, and how those perceptions have shifted over time. Students will also study changes in government policy and how changing policy has affected people experiencing homelessness.  It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for understanding the root causes of the expansion of homelessness in the U.S., and to convey a sense of the experience of homelessness and its consequences. There will be exploration of the current efforts to meet the immediate needs of the homeless. The course will empower students to advocate for sustainable changes which can prevent homelessness. Students will glean a deeper understanding of homelessness through readings and class discussions, and through interacting with people who are experiencing homelessness at the Student-Run Emergency Housing Unit of Philadelphia.
ATTRIBUTES: Ethics Concentration:Economics and Public Policy elective, History, Diversity 1.

23101 PJ 5600-001 INDEPENDENT STUDY
TBA   Getek Soltis

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE P&J ATTRIBUTES
21787 COM 3207- 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN RHETORIC
TR 1:00-2:15 Crable

What does it mean to be black—as an individual and as a member of a community—in the United States? How, historically, has the black experience been constructed through rhetorical discourse, and how does that process continue, in our present, 21st century context? In this class, we will examine these questions (and some answers to them) through a critical examination of a variety of rhetorical artifacts. The primary objective of the course is therefore to develop a comprehensive understanding of the symbols used to rhetorically construct and reconstruct the African American identity and community. Some of these symbols will include historical speeches, essays, articles, and poems written about the black experience in America. Some of these symbols will include contemporary media artifacts that continue to intervene in the struggle over the meaning of blackness in America. We will also study how these symbolic representations created (and create) lived realities sustaining systems of oppression that impacted (and impact) the lives of black Americans—and, indeed, all Americans.
ATTRIBUES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

21788 COM 3241 –001 PERFORMANCE of LITERATUE
MW 3:00-4:15 Rose

In this course we take as given that literature—poems, short stories, novels, drama, nonfiction (including social media texts, memoir, personal narrative)—has the potential to challenge systems that give rise to experiences of power, privilege, and marginalization. Through the study, understanding and performance of literary voices of non-dominant groups in the US and Western Europe, we will use our bodies and creative energies to make art that challenges us to come to greater understandings of ourselves and others. We will pay particular attention to point of view and literary/performance style in interrogating cultural identities, relationships, and power dynamics—all in the service of creating dialogical performances that engage audiences to see the world in new ways. 
ATTRIBUTES: Fine Arts requirement, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

21801 COM 3390 - 001 TOP:RACE & ETHNICITY in FILM
W 1:30-4:00 Ehrlich
This course is designed to serve as an intensive study of the representation of race and ethnicity in American cinema. Students will be investigating how film has often served as a mirror to society’s ills, and has been used to imagine and advocate a more just system. Some of the topics covered will be migrant narratives, Native Americans and the American Western, depictions of slavery and the civil rights movement, immigrant cinema and tropes of narco and mafia narratives, music videos as vehicle for cross-cultural exposure and more. Students will also be introduced to the basic vocabulary and concepts necessary to critically analyze, understand, appreciate and make films. This is an interdisciplinary class that draws upon film studies, feminist studies and critical race studies as well as social and political histories to explore cinematic story telling and its greater cultural impact.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

21803 COM 3448-100 MULTICULT. LEADERSHIP
W 6:10-8:50 Anthony, Bowen, Nance
Multicultural Leadership is designed to introduce students to scholarship that addresses the way in which injustice and misunderstanding appears in America, the world and at our University.  It examines how social constructions (of gender, ethnicity, race, culture, social class, sexual orientation, physical or mental ability, age and national origin) serve to organize the world in ways that exclude, or include, empower or oppress. Through a dynamic engagement of their knowledge and understanding of justice and equity issues, students will develop a dialogic perspective and a set of dialogic skills as one of the means of transforming themselves and their community.  Finally, the course will focus on practical ways students can use what
they  learn to become effective leaders at Villanova and beyond.
Students will participate in additional one-credit topically-focused dialogue groups scheduled throughout the semester. Permission of Chairperson required; Additional 14 outside hours of weekend and evening dialogue practice through COM 5300 IGR workshops
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1. Restricted; requires permission of Instructor.

21810 COM  3600-001 SOCIAL JUSTICE DOCUMENTARY
TR 1:00-3:45 McWillaims & O’Leary   21811
COM  3600-002  SOCIAL JUSTICE DOCUMENTARY
TR 1:00-3:45 Lewis

The goal of the course is to allow students to use media-making in the service of social justice. As you participate in this course please remember this definition of a documentary: “Documentaries are about real life; they are not real life.  They are portraits of real life, using real life as their raw material, constructed by artists and technicians who make myriad decisions about what story to tell whom, and for what purpose.”

This semester’s film will be about a K-8 school in West Philadelphia, St. Francis de Sales.  This school has a remarkable academic reputation. The school describes itself as being “comprised of an eclectic and electrifying mix of refugees and children from over 45 nations.” The faculty and staff work hard to celebrate the many different backgrounds found in the student body.  The school points out many of their students “have fled revolutions, guerrillas, and wars to come to America to pursue their dreams of peace and freedom.  They are the survivors---from Cambodia, Bangladesh, Erittrea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Dominican Republic, and dozens of other nations—and the future of our country.”  We will use the film making process to explore issues of diversity in education. In-class time will be divided up between lectures, videos, exercises, and demonstration.  Many class periods will be in-field production or post-production work.  The goal of the course is for all of the students to gain experience in the production of a documentary film. However, after the first weeks of class all students will be given more specific roles so that the film can be completed in the time allotted.
This course will require a substantial time commitment from each student in addition to the Tuesday-Thursday class time.  This is a 6 credit course: Permission of Instructor is required.

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice.

21824 COM 5300-100 TOP IN IGR DIALOGUE
M 6:00-8:00 Bowen, Dwyer

IGR (Intergroup Relations) are 1-credit courses focusing on creating understanding relationships among people from different social identity groups (e.g., economic, racial and ethnic). This is accomplished by developing the communication skills of dialogic listening, empathy, and intentional engagement. In Fall 2016, all COM 5300 IGR courses will meet Mondays, 6-8pm. Students must complete the application at http://www.villanova.edu/igr and attend all classes. Permission of Chairperson required. Students will be placed in section COM 5300-100 and later assigned to topical dialogues on gender, sexual orientation, racial identity, race, socioeconomic status, and faith. Three IGR courses can be taken over the same or different semesters to count as a Free Elective in CLAS and VSB, as well as a Diversity 1 in CLAS.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Permission of Director required.

21831 COM 5300-107 TOP IN IGR DIALOGUE: ADVANCED RACE  
F5:00-9:00 Bowen & Dwyer
S9:00-5:00                                                                                                                                                                                                
All stutuents must complete the form at www.villanova.edu/igr. Students must have previously taken the Race or Racial Identity IGR course. Dates to be determined. Permission of Director required.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.                                                                                                                

21849 CRM 1001-001  INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY
TR 11:30-12:45  Welch

This course offers an overview of the nature and extent of crime in the United States.  The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how crime is defined as well as the historical crime trends in the U.S. and current explanations for these patterns.  We will also explore: the key correlates of criminal behavior and existing  theoretical explanations for these relationships, several types of crime in-depth, and contemporary forms of crime control and their consequences.  Throughout the course we will analyze how crime is related to the broader social context.
ATTRIBUTES:
Core Social Sciene, Peace & Justice. Restrictions: Closed to students who have completed Criminology 3000.

21853 CRM 3001-001  JUSTICE and SOCIETY
TR 2:30-3:45 Hannon
This course examines the U.S. criminal justice system from a sociological perspective. Sociological theories of social control and the origin of law are used to frame important issues of criminal justice and social policy. The most current studies are reviewed on the effectiveness of rehabilitation, decriminalization, deterrence, incapacitation, and various police initiatives. The major components of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections) are analyzed with attention to possible tensions between due process and crime control, bureaucratic efficiency and adversarial checks-and-balances, and the law in theory and the law in practice. Finally, this course emphasizes the importance of understanding the criminal justice system as one of many social institutions relevant for crime reduction, and furthermore, stresses the ways in which effective criminal justice policy is contingent on the vitality of other social institutions (family, school, community, and economy).
ATTRIBUTES:
Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice.

21921 CST 2100-H01 HON: INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES
MW 4:30-5:45 Hollis  
What is culture? In this introductory course students explore the various definitions of culture in the era of globalization. We'll discuss commercialization and popular culture (music, TV, films, advertisements, etc.) and their representation in the print and electronic media across the globe phenomena.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

22081 EDU 3263-001 DIVERSITY and INCLUSION
TR 4:00-5:15 Staff

An investigation of the complex issues of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, and special education through intellectual inquiry and study.  Students in the course will investigate the philosophical, theoretical, and historical foundations of multicultural education, gender education, and special education.
ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Core Social Science, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Service learning component.

22082 EDU 3264-001  INTRODUCTION TO DISABILITY STUDIES
MW 1:30-2:45 Bialka                    
                                                                                                
Disability Studies refers to the examination of disability as a historical, social, political and cultural phenomenon. As such, the field of disability studies assumes a social constructivist view that is “concerned with the social processes that ‘disable’ people” (Gabel & Danforth, 2002). This course will provide students with a framework for discussing and deconstructing disability and increase their understanding of the role, purpose and function of special education. Over course of the semester, students will have an opportunity to clarify and challenge their beliefs about what it means to have a disability. In addition to presenting undergraduates with information pertaining to specific disabilities and related pedagogical practices, this course sheds light on the social implications of disability. As such, students will examine ableism and the ways in which it is rooted in negative cultural assumptions about disability (Hehir, 2002). Furthermore, students will gain exposure to different theoretical models of disability and use these constructs to examine the legacy of special education in the United States and abroad.
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Service learning component. EDU Majors and Minors Only.

22339 GEV 3000-002 GROWING INTO JUSTICE THROUGH AGRICULTURE
TR 10:00-11:15 Armon
Join us for readings, discussions, work on local farms, and multi-media learning to explore ecologically sound food and agriculture and their relationship to sustainable and socially responsible lifestyles.  We will examine provocative viewpoints on food ownership, production, and rights as they relate to human well-being, poverty, and environmental issues.  Topics will include food justice and food security, urban food deserts in Philadelphia and elsewhere, human health, biodiversity, industrial agriculture, permaculture, and global water issues.  Consideration of how religious, political, and economic belief systems impact agricultural practices and food availability will be woven throughout the course as we read, discuss, watch films, visit local farms, and hear from guest speakers who are active in sustainable agriculture.  Farm work at local urban farms will be a significant aspect of the course and will accommodate students' schedules as best as possible.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Ethics Concentration: Ethical Issues in Science Technology and the Environment,  ENV-
Environmental Science, ENVA- Environmental Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

22340 GEV 3001-001 INTRODUCTION TO SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES
MWF 9:30-10:20 Staff

In this interdisciplinary seminar course, we will explore the historical, philosophical, environmental, scientific, economic, and political dimensions of sustainability. Drawing on scientific theory, GIS data, documentary films, historical documents, guest speakers, and other diverse sources, students will examine case studies of local, national and international sustainability initiatives; the scientific data shaping debates on global climate change; and the issues facing people of color, indigenous groups, and women in the 21st century as a result of environmental exploitation and social exclusion. This is not a lecture course. Together we will investigate the most important moral and material issues of the 21st century via discussions that depend upon regular participation on the part of all seminar members.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

22394 GIS 2000-001 INTRO TO GLOBAL STUDIES
MW 1:30-2:45 Akoma

What is the meaning of “universal common good”? How can we begin to take steps to make progress toward achieving it? What are the major problems facing our global society? And, how do we begin to analyze them? This course is intended to introduce the students to think critically about these and similar questions in an interdisciplinary framework.
ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Core Social Science, Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

22401 GIS 6500-001 CAPSTONE  SEMINAR        
MW 3:00-4:15 Akoma

The GIS Capstone seminar is designed as an introduction to the field of postcolonial studies, a dynamic field of research that has emerged and grown in the past twenty years. Postcolonial studies is defined by an interdisciplinary approach to a variety issues, including: the experience of colonialism and anti-colonial struggles; the role of discourse, rhetoric and language in processes of domination and resistance; the complex ways in which the colonial experience has shaped the modern world; and the social, cultural and political conditions of postcoloniality.  We will begin by defining issues of power relationships in a historic context. By looking at how certain categories pertinent to postcolonial theory--such as race, gender, and class--are constructed and by scrutinizing the role of power relationships in these constructs, we will be able unearth hidden agendas of colonization and the major issues of postcolonial societies.
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1 & 3.

22406 GWS 2050-001 GENDER and the WORLD
TR 1:00-2:15 Foster

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the arguments underpinning three fields: feminist studies, with an emphasis on women of color feminism; women’s studies; and gender studies. Although our materials will be wide-ranging and diverse, all of our discussions will help us study three fundamental and still-urgent questions about contemporary life: How do societies construct and regulate sex, gender, and sexuality? How do our bodies, gendered behaviors, and desires shape our identities and possibilities? And, perhaps most importantly, in what ways does feminism remain a vibrant and necessary resource as we seek to make sense of and influence our world?
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 2.

22432 HIS 2276-001 AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY
TR 10:00-11:15 Rosier

This course explores the history of the American environment and the history of American environmentalism from the pre-Columbian era to the present.  We will examine a variety of historical documents and works of ecology, public policy, history and cultural studies to help us understand how Americans, through settlement and industrialization, engendered ‘changes in the land’ and how these changes gave rise to environmental citizenship.  While focusing on developments in agriculture, public policy, economics, science and technology, we will also consider, more generally, issues of gender, race, and class; during the final weeks of the course we will investigate the ways in which environmental degradation is suffered predominately by minority and poor communities by studying several “environmental justice” movements.  In addition, we will consider the place of ‘nature’ in our culture of consumption.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

22438 HIS 4041-001 HIST. IN THE MOD. MIDDLE EAST
TR 11:30-12:45 Abugideiri

The objective of this course is to provide a basis for understanding historical processes – particularly processes of modernization and nation building – within the Middle East and North Africa in the modern period. It provides an understanding of the social, religious, cultural, economic and political institutions and forces that have shaped the history of the modern Middle East, beginning from the apex of the Ottoman Empire until contemporary times. There are four major areas covered in this course. First, we begin by examining the multifaceted institutions undergirding the longevity, success and ultimate demise of the Ottoman Empire. Second, we turn to the rise of European imperialism, its encroachment and effects on Middle Eastern and North African societies. Third, we study the developments that transformed the region to become “the Middle East” in the post-WWI independence era, paying special attention to the evolution of nationalist and anti-nationalist movements. Finally, drawing on the historical background provided in the course, we address four contemporary political issues/conflicts in historical perspective (e.g., the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, the Iranian Revolution, the Gulf War and the rise of political Islam in Algeria). To analyze these key historical processes, we will be reading primary and secondary texts, visual materials, film and literature (in translation).
ATTRIBUTES: Arab and Islamic Studies, Peace & Justice,  Diversity 3.

22470 HON  5700-001 PSC: JUSTICE SEMINAR
TR 1:00-2:15 Busch

In this course, we will study two rival approaches to understanding political justice. We begin with Aristotle’s Politics, the work of classical philosophy that educates the practical work of citizens and statesmen. We will ask questions like these: Who should rule, and for what purpose? How to judge the rival claims made for oligarchy, democracy, and aristocracy, the regimes concerned with wealth, freedom, and virtue? Which of these, or what combination, is the right choice? The second half of the course considers the rise, in modernity, of a new kind of government, one that secures the rights of individuals, governs itself through representation, and thrives on commerce. Why did philosophers like Montesquieu and statesmen like James Madison think that justice is better served in a modern republic than in the regimes recommended by Aristotle?  Were they right to think so?
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice. Non-Honors students may take an Honors course with the approval of the Director;Minimum 3.33 GPA required.

22491 HUM 2002-001 HUMAN PERSON
MW 1:30-2:45 Wilson

Is our understanding of the human person sufficient to rise to the challenge of life in the twenty-first century? Covering authors from Tolstoy to Tolkien, this Humanities Gateway seminar examines fundamental aspects of the human experience, from birth through death, and considers how to pursue the good amid the dramatic unfolding of human life.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice. Contact Chair of Humanities for Registration.                          

22493 HUM 2004-001 SOCIETY
MW 3:00-4:15 Hirschfield

We live in a time when political, economic, and family life dominate our horizon of concerns. And yet we also live in a time when we seem cynical about the possibility of finding meaning in them. How is our dependant, rational nature developed in society through marriage, family, work, markets, and government? How can we engage these activities today in a way that is genuinely good for us?
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Political Science. Contact Chair of Humanities for Registration.

22554 MAT 1290-001 TOP: MATHEMATICS & SOCIAL JUSTICE
MWF 12:30-1:20 Pollack-Johnson
22555 MAT 1290-002 TOP: MATHEMATICS & SOCIAL JUSTICE
MWF 1:30-2:20 Pollack-Johnson

What do we really mean by the word “fair”?  What is fairness?  What is the level of inherent fairness of various activities and structures that we participate in every day?  What gets in the way of fairness?  Could we structure things differently to bring about more fairness?  How can we increase the level of fairness in our lives and in our world at all levels?
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

22629 MAT 5900-001 SEMINAR in MATHEMATICS
TR 11:30-12:45 Malmskog, Pollock-Johnson, Posner

Jane Addams said, “In the unceasing ebb and flow of justice and oppression we must all dig channels as best we may.”  For us, this means turning to mathematics.  In this capstone seminar for math majors, we will use mathematical and statistical models, logic, reasoning, and other tools to understand and work toward social justice.  We will consider the individual/personal, small group, organizational, political (city/town, state, country, multi-country, etc.), and societal levels as we explore essential questions such as:  What do we mean by “social justice”?  How does mathematics inform how we could structure things differently to bring about more social justice?  How do we measure social justice and how has this evolved over time?  How can we increase the level of social justice in our lives and in our world at all levels? Mathematical/statistical topics presented will depend on the interests of students in the class, and could be drawn from game theory, social choice theory, voting systems and power indices, math modeling, statistical inference, multivariable thinking and data visualization, causal inference, fair division, gerrymandering, the Gini index of economic inequality, and utility theory.  Students will work on projects related to social justice, perhaps in partnership with local or larger organizations such as nonprofits, and will make presentations both about work on their projects and on math/stat topics related to individual projects or the theme of the course.  The course will be co-taught with Drs. Posner, Volpert, and Malmskog.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

22922 NUR 7070-DL1 NUTRITION and GLOBAL HEALTH
TBD Costello

Examines existing and emerging issues in nutrition globally, with special emphasis on the developing world. Analyzes influence of human biology, the environment, culture, socioeconomic status, politics and international policies on nutrition and its impact on health of individuals and populations.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

22923 NUR 7081-001  INTERNATIONAL HEALTH
R 5:20-7:20 Mc Dermott-Levy

This course provides for an examination of international and intercultural environments for nursing and health with a specific focus on the similarities and differences of people and communities in meeting health/illness needs and factors which bear on this process.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

23008 PH1 2115-001 ETHICS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS
TR 11:30-12:45 Napier
23009 PH1 2115-002 ETHICS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS
TR 1:00-2:15 Napier
23740 PH1 2115-003 ETHICS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS
TR 2:30-3:45 Napier

This course will expose us to contemporary philosophical and ethical problems arising in medicine and health care. Though some attention will be paid to “traditional” ethical problems such as abortion, euthanasia, and assisted suicide; the primary focus of the course throughout will be on ethical problems encountered in the clinical or research setting such as those arising in the context of organ donation, surrogate decision-making, research on human subjects, reproductive technologies, end-of-life issues, futility, managing moral distress, conscience protections for health care workers, cooperation in evil and others. In addition to understanding each issue fundamentally, a unified “picture” of the ethical delivery of health care will emerge. The overarching question that animates each issue is what does loving this patient/research subject look like? This class aims to make clinicians better at loving patients/subjects.
ATTRIBUTES: Ethics Concentration: Health Care elective, Peace & Justice.

23010 PHI 2121-001 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
MWF 10:30-11:20 Murdoch
23011 PHI 2121-002 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
MWF 11:30-12:20 Murdoch
This course will explore ethical questions which concern the physical and biological environment, including analysis of competing priorities among environmental, economic and political values.  We will examine the theoretical underpinnings of our ethical choices as well as specific issues and dilemmas related to the environment, its preservation, provision, and threats to its continued sustainability.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Ethics Concentration: Science and Technology, Environment elective, Peace & Justice.

23012 PHI 2160-001 ETHICS of WAR 
MWF 12:30-1:20 Scholz    

This course will look at some of the normative and practical issues of war.  We will address ethical issues facing citizens, combatants, states, and the international community.  Although just war theory will receive some primacy, other theoretical approaches to war will also be considered including realism and pacifism.  Our study will include war, terrorism and responses to terrorism, preventive war, genocide, crimes against humanity, military intervention, security, cyber-warfare, and uninhabited aerial vehicles, among other related topics.  Students will be challenged to connect theoretical discussions to current events and encouraged to read both national and international news sources.  Students will also be invited to participate in the Ethics of War Conference at West Point, a joint conference between Villanova and the US Military Academy.
ATTRIBUTES: Ethics Concentration: Economics and Public Policy elective, Core, Peace & Justice, Theology.

23016 PHI 2450-001 CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT
TR 4:00-5:15 Duska

This course is designed to investigate and evaluate one hundred years of “Catholic Social Thought.”  The primary focus will be placed on the content and structure of papal encyclicals especially RERUM NOVARUM (1891) and will conclude with SOLLICITUDO REI SOCIALIS (1987).  In addition the pastoral letters of the American Bishops will be analyzed with special emphasis on THE CHALLENGE OF PEACE (1983) and ECONOMIC JUSTICE FOR ALL.

The richness and strength of the social teachings of the Church are indeed “our best kept secret.”  Clergy and laity alike have failed to appreciate the contributions of the Popes and synods of Bishops to a meaningful dialogue on contemporary issues of world peace and social justice.  Guest lecturers will help to show the interdisciplinary nature of Catholic teaching.
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Ethics Concentration: Economics and Public Policy elective, Peace & Justice, Core Theology.

23020 PHI 2990-002 LATIN AMERICAN PHILOSPHY
TR 2:30-3:45 Salazar

This course aims to introduce students to a number of philosophical issues and problems that arise in Latin American thought. We will look at the ways in which the Latin American context shapes and informs the activity of philosophy. Our point of departure will be the encounter between the Spanish and the Natives in 1492 and our focus will be mainly on the social and political issues that arise on account of the conquest, slavery, colonialism, post-colonial nation-building, racism, poverty, and dependency.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

23207 RLL 3440- 001 THE POSTCOLONIAL PERSPECTIVE
TR 4:00-5:15 Achille

Focusing on a representative selection of contemporary films (2005 and after), we will explore the various ways in which directors from different origins and backgrounds chose to represent the experiences specific to France’s racial, ethnic and cultural minorities, or (post)colonial Others. We will study a mix of highly popular films and works from lesser-known directors in order to better understand how these issues are perceived and presented to the audience, French and international.
ATTRIBUTES: Arab and Islamic Studies, Africana Studies minor/concentration, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

23270 SOC 2950-001 PERSPECTIVES ON U.S. POVERTY
TBD De Fina
This course examines different aspects of poverty in the United States, emphasizing what William Julius Wilson calls the “new urban poverty.”  It explores how poverty is measured, the causes and consequences of poverty, and policies that might be used to combat poverty.  Some of the important topics covered include the roles of de-industrialization, changes in the minimum wage, housing segregation, community dynamics and education in the generation and persistence of poverty.  The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating insights from both economics and sociology.  There are no pre-requisites.  The course has a lecture/discussion format.  Readings include two texts and a collection of relevant articles.
ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Core Social Science, Ethics Concentration:Economics and Public Policy elective, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Service learning option.

23273 SOC 3600-001 RACE & ETHNIC RELATIONS
TR 2:30-3:45 Kramer

Race and ethnicity have long been key dividers of American society, and as such, a main focus of sociological work since its inception. This course introduces the sociological study of race, ethnicity, and assimilation. The class examines the different experiences and outcomes of individuals of different racial and ethnic backgrounds, the historical processes, and the growth of new racial formations, group divisions, and outlooks for the future. The class begins with classic work on race and American society, but spends most of the time looking at more recent research and theorization. The course will also discuss the empirical realities of racial inequality, reasons for both optimism and pessimism, and theoretical understandings of the origins of such inequality—both “liberal” and “conservative” theories. The work also takes a critical eye towards the academy and how academic work can be used to work both towards racial equity and against such efforts, either intentionally or unintentionally. Due to the long history of racial inequality in American society and the very different theories to explain such inequality, the class may be contentious, topics raised difficult, and students may feel challenged by the materials. That’s okay—in fact, that’s a sign the course is doing what it should.
ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Latin American Studies requirement, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

23338 SPA 2993-001 SPANISH COMMUNITY INTERPRETER INTERNSHIP
T 4:00-6:00 Hidalgo Nava                                                                                                                   

The course is designed for undergraduate students with advanced proficiency in Spanish who seek to apply and improve   their   linguistic   and   cultural   competencies   in   a   real-world   setting. This course   in   community interpretation prepares the interns to be verbal interpreters and/or translators of (oral and written) documents, from English to Spanish or vice versa,  by introducing  them  to  the  basic  theory  and  strategies  for  written  translation  and  oral interpretation. This includes an introduction to two-way interpretation, consecutive interpretation, general and legal translation, and specific linguistic areas relevant to the needs of the Law School Clinic clients. Through hands-on practice and exercises, the interns develop the fundamental analytical, cognitive, and linguistic skills that are essential for written translation, and two interpretation modes (consecutive and sight translation). This community-based learning course allows the student intern to use his/her Spanish abilities while helping law students to serve the Latino community in Southeastern Pennsylvania. As part of the course, students will enhance their consciousness about the unfair conditions many immigrants need to face while they struggle to start a new life in the US and to provide for their families and themselves. Students will have the opportunity to be in contact with the immigrant Latino community and, as a consequence of that interaction, they will develop a greater understanding about their situation, along with more compassion and tolerance.                      
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

23340 SPA 3074-001 HISPANIC CINEMA 
MW 1:30:2:45 Salinas
Analysis of films from Spain and/or Latin America as a representation of identities and reflection of particular political and social circumstances. Prerequisite: 1132 or equivalent
ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Latin American Studies requirement, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

23418 THL 3740-001 LIBERATION THEOLOGIES
TR  8:30-9:45  Purcaro                                                        

This course is designed for students in the Service Learning Community.  Fr. Art  is an Augustinian who served with the poorest of the poor in Peru for 30 years.  He brings a wealth of experience and love for the poor to this course.  Liberation Theology calls us to see how the poor are marginalized by society, describes how to  work among them in order to  advocate on their behalf, and most importantly to use what we have in order for the poor to  find their power so they can advocate for themselves. Liberation Theology proposes that Christ desires to free our fellow human beings from the social structures that keep them impoverished. St Augustine stated: You give bread to a hungry person; but it would be better were no one hungry, and you could give it to no one. (Tractate 1 John 8,8)   This course will examine the role of Charity and the pursuit of Justice, as well as how we think about and work with and for the poor.
ATTRIBUTES:  Peace & Justice, Sophomore Service Learning Community only, Diversity 3                

23424 THL 5000-001 DO BLACK LIVES MATTER to GOD: A THEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION of RACE & RESISTANCE
MW  4:30-5:45 Leapheart

Has God sanctioned #BlackLivesMatter? Would Jesus protest the killings of Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, Eric Garner, Rekia Boyd, or Aiyana Stanley-Jones? How should people of Christian faith respond to Black protest? In this course, we will attempt to construct a Divine argument for resistance to racialized violence and oppression. To do this, we will engage the biblical text and the texts of historical narrative, literature, poetry, music, visual art, and film to explore key theological topics, including sin, suffering, and salvation. As we center the perspectives of Black, womanist, mujerista, queer, and Native theologians, scholars, organizers, artists, and activists, we will seek to discover a theological framework for the contemporary Movement for Black Lives. Ultimately, we will seek to be empowered by this framework, integrating it with our own faith and practice in order to live into the prophetic call to do justice.
ATTRIBUTES:  Peace & Justice

Spring 2017 Subcatalog

31971 PJ 2800-100 RACE, CLASS, AND GENDER                                             R 6:10-8:50 Schultz

What is oppression?  What's its relation to racial, sexual, gender and class identity?  How can we resist oppression?  Together we’ll try to answer these three questions.  We’ll do this by examining social identities as they are formed at the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality.  We’ll generate ideas about the nature and structure of oppression, violence, and social equality, as well as possibilities of resisting oppression, by examining both classic and more recent theory.  But we’ll also be examining current policies, trends, movements, and events.  An important component of this course will be the examination of the current situation, and to that end we’ll read speeches by President Obama and recent articles from Philadelphia Magazine and The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer. We can only tackle our two questions by creating a cooperative learning environment: by making our class a workshop in which we critically examine our own vantage-points in constant dialogue with one another.  In this class it’s essential that we learn from and teach one another.                                          
ATTRIBUTES: Africana studies minor/concentration, Cultural Studies, Ethics elective (EEPP),
Gender & Women’s Studies, Philosophy, Diversity 1 & 2.

 

31972 PJ 2900-001 ETHICAL ISSUES IN PEACE & JUSTICE                             TR 2:30-3:45 Stehl

This course will introduce and examine the economic, political, and social roots of contemporary moral issues, with special emphasis on the Catholic Christian perspective.  The course will survey issues like poverty, globalization, violence, conflict, and human rights. This primary focus will explore: the historical & cultural elements of environmental exploitation, critiques of fossil fuel dependency & peak oil, the ethics & principles of natural systems and holistic design that go beyond sustainability (permaculture), and practical alternative approaches toward social, economic & environmental justice.

ATTRIBUTES: Environmental Studies, Ethics elective (ETST) Core Theology.

 

31973 PJ 2993 INTERNSHIP                                                                                       TBA Getek Soltis

31974 PJ 2996 INTERNSHIP                                                                                       TBA Getek Soltis

                                               

31975 PJ 4000-H01 PATHS IN UTOPIA                                                           TR 4:00-5:15 McCarraher

A map of the world that does not include Utopia is not worth even glancing at," Oscar Wilde once wrote.  In this course, we'll be looking at maps that did include Utopia, and determine whether or to what extent they are worth glancing at.  From Eden and Atlantis, Cockaigne and El Dorado, to the technological utopias of modernity, people have imagined ideal societies throughout the ages, communities in which justice, dignity, and love have triumphed -- once and for all.  While utopias have been invaluable in spurring reform or revolution, they have also been sources of disappointment and bloodshed.  We will trace the utopian imagination in a number of genres and disciplines, from literature, philosophy, and theology to science fiction and advertising, and consider some examples of dystopia as well.  Authors will include Plato, Thomas More, Francis Bacon, Samuel Butler, Edward Bellamy, William Morris, Martin Buber, Aldous Huxley, and Ursula Le Guin.
ATTRIBUTES: Honors, Humanities. Non-Honors students with a minimum 3.0 GPA are eligible for this course and should contact the director, kathryn.geteksoltis@villanova.edu

 

 

31976 PJ 5000-001 THEOLOGY, ETHICS & CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN AMERICA  
                                                                                                                     MW 1:30-2:45 Getek Soltis

What is true justice and to what extent does our criminal justice system implement it?  This course begins by engaging Scripture and classic theological voices in an attempt to reconcile divine justice with punishment, atonement, and notions of damnation/salvation.  After also examining key ethical theories of justice and punishment, we examine the realities of criminal justice in America. Our focus on current practices in sentencing and corrections will include the war on drugs, solitary confinement, life without parole, re-entry, education in prisons, and the intersection of criminal justice with race and class. Ultimately, how might theological and ethical approaches to justice inform (and reform) our courts and prisons?
**This course includes an optional service-learning component to tutor those involved in the criminal justice system.  Locations of tutoring for Spring 2015 are being finalized. Options in the past have included Graterford Prison and Sisters Returning Home in Germantown.

ATTRIBUTES: Criminal Justice, Ethics elective, ETPL, Humanities, Core Theology, Diversity 1.

 

31977 PJ 5000-002 HISTORY OF HOMELESSNESS                                         MW 3:00-4:15 Sena

The History of Homelessness will offer an examination of the diverse societal perceptions of homelessness and poverty, and how those perceptions have shifted over time. Students will also study changes in government policy and how changing policy has affected people experiencing homelessness.  It is the intention of this course to provide a framework for understanding the root causes of the expansion of homelessness in the U.S., and to convey a sense of the experience of homelessness and its consequences. There will be exploration of the current efforts to meet the immediate needs of the homeless. The course will empower students to advocate for sustainable changes which can prevent homelessness. Students will glean a deeper understanding of homelessness through readings and class discussions, and through interacting with people who are experiencing homelessness at the Student-Run Emergency Housing Unit of Philadelphia.

ATTRIBUTES: History, ETEP, Diversity 1.

 

31978 PJ 5000-003 TOP: BASEBALL, JUST. and the AMERICAN DREAM TR 10:00-11:15 Joyce

31979 PJ 5000-004 TOP: BASEBALL, JUST. and the AMERICAN DREAM TR 11:30-12:45 Joyce                                                                                                                                               
This course will examine American culture through the lens of its national pastime – baseball. We will explore the politics of race, citizenship, gender, labor, public and private space, popular culture and advertising, among others, as we ask what baseball represents, what it should represent, and how it relates to justice.  How might baseball and the ideals of the American dream correlate? How do they fall short? What does baseball reveal about our national identity? Our values? Our ethics? Through literature, film, and essays, we will examine baseball as an agent of socialization, a source of economics, a powerful generational connection, and as a transmitter of rhetoric and culture. In critiquing its failings and celebrating its efficacy, we will investigate how baseball continues to be an important component of American society. Knowledge and/or love of baseball are not a pre-requisite, but are welcomed.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies, English, Gender & Women’s Studies, Sociology, Diversity 1 & 2.

 

31980 PJ 5100-100 DISCRIMINATION, JUSTICE, & LAW                             M 6:10-8:50 McDaid

This class will teach students about major areas of United States discrimination law and the development of the law in these areas.  Given the varied and expanding areas in which discrimination law of some sort comes into play, the course will be limited to racial, gender-based, and sexual preference-based discrimination.  An overview of age or disability discrimination will be selected according to student interests, if time permits.  The course will begin with an introduction to the relationship of the United States Constitution, federal statutes, and case law.  Students’ case materials cover the development and current status of discrimination and civil rights law as it exists in different contexts.  From the materials, students will also glean a working knowledge of the United States Supreme Court and the federal judicial system.  Class arguments will develop an understanding of the finer points of constitutional fairness and its relationship to concepts of individual justice

ATTRIBUTES: Ethics elective, ETEP, ETPL, Diversity 1.

 

 

 

31981 PJ 5500-H01 POLITICS OF WHITENESS                                             TR 1:00-2:15 Anthony

This course will be an examination of the past and present scholarship which serves to debate and deconstruct the nature of whiteness.  Historically, whiteness has been the unexamined, invisible, normative backdrop from which people of color have been defined, delimited, and “othered.”   We will analyze  the nature and structure of “whiteness” and the spectrum of white supremacy that is affiliated with it.  “White supremacy” and "white privilege" will be central issues of the course, as they are deployed through and embodied in people (of different races), different systems of thought, and various social practices and institutions.  The course will conclude by looking at the debate over the question of whether or not “whiteness”, as a social construct and personal identity, can be recreated and rehabilitated from the privilege, invisibility, and the normative power it has involved.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies, Cultural Studies, ETEP, ETPL, Honors, Philosophy, Diversity 1. Non-Honors students with a minimum 3.0 GPA are eligible for this course and should contact the director, kathryn.geteksoltis@villanova.edu.

 

31982 PJ 5600-001 INDEPENDENT STUDY                                                            TBA  Getek Soltis

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE P&J ATTRIBUTES

 

30690 COM 3201- 001 RHETORIC and SOCIAL JUSTICE                             TR 2:30-3:45 Murray

In this course, we will explore and critically examine discourses on social justice and human rights through an integration of rhetorical theory and criticism. Of central importance to ensuring social justice and human rights are those communicative/rhetorical acts that disrupt, provoke, encourage, and help to mobilize. From public debates to mediated dialogues, from embodied politics and performances of resistance to more extreme acts of violence and terrorism, the rhetorical scholar has a responsibility to study how those practices enrich (or hinder) social justice and participation in public life as well as determine their effectiveness, ineffectiveness and ethical dimensions.

 As a student in this course, you will learn how to identify, analyze, invent, augment, and/or challenge the complex array of discourses on social justice and human rights. You will be introduced to the theoretical foundations of rhetoric and social justice and the various communicative techniques and strategies common to those struggling to advance human rights. In addition, you will gain exposure to an array of contemporary and historical debates that continue to shape popular and political culture.

ATTRIBUES: Peace & Justice.

 

30691 COM 3207- 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN RHETORIC                               TR 1:00-2:15 Crable
What does it mean to be black—as an individual and as a member of a community—in the United States? How, historically, has the black experience been constructed through rhetorical discourse, and how does that process continue, in our present, 21st century context? In this class, we will examine these questions (and some answers to them) through a critical examination of a variety of rhetorical artifacts. The primary objective of the course is therefore to develop a comprehensive understanding of the symbols used to rhetorically construct and reconstruct the African American identity and community. Some of these symbols will include historical speeches, essays, articles, and poems written about the black experience in America. Some of these symbols will include contemporary media artifacts that continue to intervene in the struggle over the meaning of blackness in America. We will also study how these symbolic representations created (and create) lived realities sustaining systems of oppression that impacted (and impact) the lives of black Americans—and, indeed, all Americans.

ATTRIBUES: Africana Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

 

30692 COM 3240 –001 PERFORMANCE for SOCIAL CHANGE        MW 1:30-2:45 MacDonald

This course explores four basic questions: 1) What is the relationship between the aesthetic and the rhetorical? 2) How can performance utilize multiple art forms and media to influence social change and social justice? 3) What is the relationship between performer and audience? 4) How can performers work in collaboration to inquire about social issues as well as to perform in ways that enact change? Thus, we will explore performance as simultaneously a process and product—a means of exploring questions about self and society, and at the same time a means of articulating a rhetorical message designed to spark some kind of change.

In order to facilitate this exploration, our semester’s work will revolve around a theme: “Identity and Materiality.” In addition to shorter performances and exercises, primary work will involve selecting and researching a social issue related to this theme, then playing with various media and modes of performance to wrestle with the questions raised, and finally creating a script and performing the piece for class and public.

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1 & 2, Fine Arts requirement.

 

32737 COM 3490- 100 DIALOGUE & INTERSECTIONALITY                     M 6:10-8:50 Bowen
This course focuses on the intersections of identities (gender, race, sexual orientation, religion). Consistent with topical IGR courses, this course utilizes dialogue as the method through which examination of texts and experiences are analyzed. We will deconstruct the dimensions of dialogue as a communicative process, learn skills to engage in fruitful difficult dialogues, and explore discrimination, oppression, and power based on the intersections of identity.  A prerequisite to this class is the successful completion of a 1-credit IGR course and/or recommendation of the instructors.

ATTRIBUES: COM 5300 is a prerequisite, Peace & Justice.

 

 

 

30733 COM 5300-100  TOP IGR DIALOGUE                                    T 6:00-8:00 Bowen & Dwyer                                        IGR (Intergroup Relations) are 1-credit courses focusing on creating understanding relationships among people from different social identity groups (e.g., economic, racial and ethnic). This is accomplished by developing the communication skills of dialogic listening, empathy, and intentional engagement. In Spring 2017, all COM 5300 IGR courses will meet Tuesdays, 6-8pm. Students must complete the application at www.villanova.edu/igr and attend all classes. Permission of Chairperson required. Students will be placed in section COM 5300-100 and later assigned to topical dialogues on gender, sexual orientation, racial identity, race, socioeconomic status, and faith. Three IGR courses can be taken over the same or different semesters to count as a Free Elective in CLAS and VSB, as well as a Diversity 1 in CLAS.  
ATTRIBUES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

                                                                                                                   

30740 COM 5300-107 TOP:IGR DIALOGUE: ADVANCED RACE   F 5:00-9:00 Dwyer & Bowen
                                                                                                                       S 9:00-5:00 Dwyer & Bowen                                                                                                                                
Advanced Race will take place on a Friday evening and Saturday TBD. All students must complete the form at www.villanova.edu/IGR; Students must have previously taken the Race or Racial Identity IGR course; permission of Chairperson required.                                                                                                              
ATTRIBUES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

                                                                                        

30756 CRM 1001-001 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY               MWF 10:30-11:20 Remster
30757 CRM 1001-002 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY               MWF 11:30-12:20 Remster
30758 CRM 1001-003 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINOLOGY                           TR 1:00-2:15 Welch

This course offers an overview of the nature and extent of crime in the United States.  The course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how crime is defined as well as the historical crime trends in the U.S. and current explanations for these patterns.  We will also explore: the key correlates of criminal behavior and existing  theoretical explanations for these relationships, several types of crime in-depth, and contemporary forms of crime control and their consequences.  Throughout the course we will analyze how crime is related to the broader social context.

ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Peace & Justice, Restrictions: Closed to students who have completed Criminology 3000.

 

30760 CRM 3001-002 JUSTICE and SOCIETY                                           TR 10:00-11:15 Arvanities

This course examines the U.S. criminal justice system from a sociological perspective. Sociological theories of social control and the origin of law are used to frame important issues of criminal justice and social policy. The most current studies are reviewed on the effectiveness of rehabilitation, decriminalization, deterrence, incapacitation, and various police initiatives. The major components of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections) are analyzed with attention to possible tensions between due process and crime control, bureaucratic efficiency and adversarial checks-and-balances, and the law in theory and the law in practice. Finally, this course emphasizes the importance of understanding the criminal justice system as one of many social institutions relevant for crime reduction, and furthermore, stresses the ways in which effective criminal justice policy is contingent on the vitality of other social institutions (family, school, community, and economy).
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice.

 

30764 CRM 4000-H01: SEMINAR in RACIAL JUSTICE                                   W6:10-8:50 Welch
In this course, students will examine the complex inter-relationships between race, crime, and the justice system within American social and political contexts. Students will build their analytic and critical thinking skills about important race and criminal justice matters that continue to polarize. This class will weigh the value of facts over opinions in light of historical socio-political context. Although we will examine the role of individual behavior when it comes to crime, victimization, and social responses to those events, we will move beyond simplistic individualistic ideas about race and racial bias and examine whether and to what degree racial inequality and racism are at the root of criminal justice practices that disparately effect racial and ethnic minorities. Further, we will evaluate to what extent our social and political institutions contribute to evident inequalities. Using a broad perspective, students will assess how racial disparities in crime and justice both reflect and contribute to racial and social injustice.

ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

 

30842 CST 4100-001 CAP:US and GLOBAL POP CULTURE                         MW 3:00-4:15 Hollis
American popular culture is a media-rich amalgam of creations that have spread around the globe--for better or worse. This course focuses on these creations, studying them from the perspectives of rhetorical, cultural and visual theory.  Objects for interpretive critique come from practices of everyday life as well as music, social media and "selfies," cinema, fashion, shopping, and "slanguage," paying special attention to issues of representation and power. The approach is intersectional with a focus on  gender, race, class and more; theoretical methodologies will include  feminism, Marxism, gender and race theory, and postmodernism. We will strive for lively class discussions and possibly take a fieldtrip to see Fun Home, the graphic novel which has been made into an award winning Broadway play. Class projects will involve rigorous textual analysis which will occasionally be combined with music and images to create videos and multimodal presentations.  Towards the end of the course, we will turn to non-commodified forms of popular culture (admittedly a debatable concept) such as folk art and graffiti. 
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

 

31002 EDU 3263- 100 DIVERTIY & INCLUSION                                                    R 6:10-8:50 Staff  

An investigation of the complex issues of race, culture, gender, sexual orientation, and special education through intellectual inquiry and study.  Students in the course will investigate the philosophical, theoretical, and historical foundations of multicultural education, gender education, and special education.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Core Social Science, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Service learning component.

 

31003 EDU 3264- 001 INTRODUCTIN to DISABILITY STUDIES                  MW 1:30-2:45 Bialka   
Disability Studies refers to the examination of disability as a historical, social, political and cultural phenomenon. As such, the field of disability studies assumes a social constructivist view that is “concerned with the social processes that ‘disable’ people” (Gabel & Danforth, 2002). This course will provide students with a framework for discussing and deconstructing disability and increase their understanding of the role, purpose and function of special education. Over course of the semester, students will have an opportunity to clarify and challenge their beliefs about what it means to have a disability. In addition to presenting undergraduates with information pertaining to specific disabilities and related pedagogical practices, this course sheds light on the social implications of disability. As such, students will examine ableism and the ways in which it is rooted in negative cultural assumptions about disability (Hehir, 2002). Furthermore, students will gain exposure to different theoretical models of disability and use these constructs to examine the legacy of special education in the United States and abroad.
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1, Service learning component.

31181 ETH 3010-001 TOP:TRAGEDY & RESPONSIBILITY                           TR 1:00-2:15 Wilson
31182 ETH 3010-H01 HON: TRAGEDY & RESPONSIBILITY                        TR 2:30-3:45 Wilson
From Oedipus and Bruce Wayne to Nelson Mandela and the Kennedys, life and literature present us with figures whose experiences are inescapably tied to tragedy.  Much of life is beyond our control:  we are, in this sense, fortune’s fools.  But is our very goodness subject to the whims of fortune?  Do we need good luck to achieve the good life, or do we take comfort knowing that morality is immune to the fates?  Can we be held responsible for things that are beyond our control, and why do we seem to mourn and rejoice our tragedies and triumphs even when they occur through happenstance?  With these questions in mind, contemporary moral theorists have debated whether certain visions of morality provide an impoverished vision of the self, one that fails to account for the significance of luck, emotions, personal integrity, and interpersonal commitments.  At stake in these debates are fundamental issues of human agency, responsibility, and the scope and limits of morality itself.  This course explores questions about moral responsibility through the lens of tragedy, focusing on the way that our experiences of misfortune confront and at times confound our received notions of autonomy, freedom, and accountability.  Of special interest will be the way that some Christian perspectives diverge from and perhaps enhance western philosophical approaches
ATTRIBUTES: Ethics, Politics, Law Elective. Peace and Justice.

31196 FFS 2993-001  INTERNSHIP: MADAGASCAR                                        TR 2:30-3:45 Achille                                                                                                                                    

This course is part of an interdisciplinary collaborative project between Catholic Relief Services and Villanova University that aims at offering support to CRS-Madagascar’s humanitarian actions in the island. In this course, we will translate documents provided by CRS-Madagascar and other Colleges on campus involved in the partnership (Engineering, Nursing, Business). Translations will be done both from French to English and from English to French depending on the targeted audience. They will include reports of completed and ongoing projects implemented by CRS in Madagascar and destined for CRS’ offices throughout the world, headquarters, donors as well as CRS’ local partners. We will also work on PowerPoint presentations to be used in workshop presentations requiring both written and oral translations. Other documents may include manuals, brochures, etc.

The other half of the course will be dedicated to understanding CRS’ Fafarano project, which this course is contributing to, while studying Madagascar’s history and culture. The goal will be to link, through a case study of CRS’ operations, a basic understanding of the nature and ethics of humanitarian work in Madagascar with the country’s specificities from a historical, political and cultural standpoint. We will start with Madagascar’s pre-colonial history and will dedicate a significant amount of time to the colonial period in order to understand the impact of the French occupation on Madagascar’s contemporary challenges. We will attempt to identify how the long lasting effects of colonization on the country’s economy and political sphere, combined with neocolonial practices, result in challenges that NGOs such as CRS attempt to address. We will also study Madagascar’s salient cultural practices to reflect upon how humanitarian projects, based on the lessons learned and best practices provided by CRS, could be implemented in order to be most effective and not interfere with the local beliefs and traditions.                      

ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

 

31287 GWS 2050-001 GENDER and the WORLD                                           TR 11:30-12:45 Foster

This course provides a rigorous introduction to the arguments underpinning three fields: feminist studies, with an emphasis on women of color feminism; women’s studies; and gender studies. Although our materials will be wide-ranging and diverse, all of our discussions will help us study three fundamental and still-urgent questions about contemporary life: How do societies construct and regulate sex, gender, and sexuality? How do our bodies, gendered behaviors, and desires shape our identities and possibilities? And, perhaps most importantly, in what ways does feminism remain a vibrant and necessary resource as we seek to make sense of and influence our world?

ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 2.

 

32613 GEV 3000-001 INTEGRAL HUMAN DEVELOPMENT: MADAGASCAR, a CASE STUDY

        MW 4:30 – 5:45 Toton

This multidisciplinary course will introduce students to the field of International Development, drawing on CRS’ work in Madagascar.  They will have an opportunity to explore how their education and skills can contribute to the fight against global poverty, resource inequality, environmental degradation, food and water insecurity, and global health threats.  Students will learn how international development is done from professionals working for a major international relief and development agency and from Villanova professors drawing on their various disciplines and own research.  They will be introduced to CRS’ Integral Human Development (IHD) framework and how it is challenging international aid.  Students will explore how foreign assistance, donor agendas, local partnerships, impact investing, civil society strengthening, gender equity, peacebuilding, and social justice can be integrated into a holistic approach to development.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies, Cultural Studies, Environmental Studies, Global Health Minor, Peace & Justice, Sustainability Studies, Diversity 3.  Permission by Director of the VU/CRS Partnership, daniel.l.griffin@villanova.edu

 

31250 GEV 3521-001 GIS for URBAN SUSTAINABILITY                            TR 1:00-2:15 Kremer

This course is an introduction to spatial aspects of urban sustainability. For the first time in history more than half of the world’s population lives in urban areas. By 2050 the share of the world’s urban population is expected to reach 70 percent. As urban population growth continues, urban centers face the problems of aging infrastructure, economic growth, changing climate, congestion, pollution, and demands of inhabitants to enhance their quality of life. Cities consume 75 percent of world’s energy and produce almost 80 percent of global GHG emissions. In response many cities are working to reduce their environmental footprint, and sustain healthy economic, social and cultural life. Creating a sustainable urban agenda requires new models of operation. The purpose of this course is to prepare its students to understand and analyze sustainability issues being faced by cities. In particular, we will focus on spatial issues related to urban sustainability and learn to utilize Geographic Information Systems in the analysis of urban sustainability.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

31278 GIS 2000- 001 INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL STUDIES                       TR 1:00-2:15 Akoma

What is the meaning of “universal common good”? How can we begin to take steps to make progress toward achieving it? What are the major problems facing our global society? And, how do we begin to analyze them? This course is intended to introduce the students to think critically about these and similar questions in an interdisciplinary framework.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies, Core Social Science, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

                        

31302 HIS 1165 – 001 GLOBAL MARKETS, EQUALITY & INEQUALITY  MWF 8:30-9:20 Little                            

This course examines empire and inequality in the modern world and emphasizes the ideological, economic, political, and cultural causes and consequences of colonization from 1500 to the present.  The course places equal emphasis on the various ways that people throughout the world resisted colonial rule and oppression.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

 

31313 HIS 2181-100 CIVIL WAR & RECONSTRUCTION                         MW 1:30-2:4:5 Giesberg

This course will be a study of the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.  The course will be divided into three chronological periods.  For the first three weeks, we will consider events leading up to the Civil War.  Then, we will examine the war years themselves, including events on the battlefield and on the home front.  In the final three weeks of the class, we will consider the period of Reconstruction and how the war is remembered today. 
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

 

31315 HIS 2292-001  AFRICAN AMER. HIS. SINCE EMANCIPATION     MWF 10:30-11:20 Little

Continuing the themes of resistance and creativity, the second half of this introduction to African-American History will discuss the development of the African-American communities in the era following The Civil War.  Discussion will include Reconstruction, Northern Migration, Jim Crow and Segregation, and Protest Thought and Civil Rights, as well as other topics.

ATTRIBUTES: Africana Studies minor/concentration, Cultural Studies,Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

 

31342 HON 4951-001 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES of INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
                                                                                                                           MWF 10:30-11:20 Eckstein

We will examine some of the subtle ways that contemporary intercollegiate athletics legitimates and perpetuates existing social inequalities of class, gender, and race/ethnicity.  The “issues” of intercollegiate athletics will include: unsustainable financial trends; moral and ethical contradictions; the corporatization of higher education; the masculinization of female sports; scholarships and admissions advantages as affirmative action for the rich and light-skinned;  commercialization and commodification of youth sports; the class and race-exclusive youth sports to college pipeline.

ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Gender and Women’s Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1 & 2. Non-Honors students may take an Honors course with the approval of the department; Minimum 3.33 GPA required; NOT open to students who have completed SOC 4200.     

 

31374 HUM 2004-100 SOCIETY                                                                         R 6:10-8:50 Hirschfield

We live in a time when political, economic, and family life dominate our horizon of concerns. And yet we also live in a time when we seem cynical about the possibility of finding meaning in them. How is our dependant, rational nature developed in society through marriage, family, work, markets, and government? How can we engage these activities today in a way that is genuinely good for us?

ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice, Political Science. Contact Chair of Humanities for Registration.

 

31406 LAS 3950-001 LATIN AMERICA FROM A GLOBAL PERSPECTIV   T 2:30-4:30 Soriano

Latin America is a vast region, extending from the American Southwest and the tropical islands of the Caribbean to the southern tip of South America, that since the process of Spanish and Portuguese colonization, have been in constant processes of adaptation and change because of colonial experience,migratory movements, multiple cultural encounters and political impositions. This course is an interdisciplinary seminar designed to examine the complexity of Latin America as a place of perennial cultural encounter, and to study the socially and culturally open landscapes of Latin America with the aim of understanding the particularities of a region inhabited and occupied by individuals who frequently transferred empires, identities, racial connotations, and geopolitical imaginations and who, immersed in contrasting colonial settings, questions and challenged their own realities. Many faculty members either formally or informally affiliated with the Latin American Studies Program will participate in the seminar and engage the topic from different perspectives (political, historical, economical, social, and cultural).
ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Latin American Studies, Peace & Justice.

 

31809 NUR 7088-001  HUMAN TRAFFICKING                                                          M 5:30-7:30 Copel

This interdisciplinary course between the College of Nursing, School of Law, and College of Arts and Sciences Department of Communication addresses the issue of human trafficking -- modern-day slavery -- from various academic perspectives.  The course addresses the growing need in the health care community for information about identifying and responding to health issues for victims, understanding the laws related to human trafficking, and responding to the diverse needs of victims.

ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

 

31890 PHI 2121-001 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS                                  MWF 10:30-11:20 Mallory
31891 PHI 2121-002 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS                                 MWF 11:30-12:20 Mallory

Environmental Ethics examines the ethical relationship between human beings and the natural world we inhabit. How ought we behave toward, and interact with what environmental philosophers call the “more-than-human world”? How have the ideas we currently hold toward beings and entities in nature emerged throughout western intellectual history? What is the connection between environmental degradation and social inequality? In addition to looking critically at cultural values, beliefs, and practices that affect the environment, this course explores emerging liberatory positions, movements, and ideas that resist human destruction of the natural environment and seek to transform the way humans relate with the natural world.

Areas of environmental ethics explored include:

  • Anthropocentric (human-centered) and ecocentric ethics
  • Environmental Justice
  • Ecofeminism
  • Social, Political, and Economic Thought and the Environment
  • Deep Ecology
  • Religious and Faith-Based Responses to Environmental Crisis

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Ethics elective (ETPL), Peace & Justice.

 

31896 PHI 2400-001 SOCIAL & POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY                       TR 1:00-2:15 Aumiller        

Marx famously claims that history repeats itself: first as tragedy then as farce. This course explores the theatrical staging of social and political life through figures such as Aristophanes, Machiavelli, Marx, Brecht, Genet, Kafka, Benjamin, Deleuze, and Žižek. A political system that perpetuates contradiction within our social life—alienating us from each other and ourselves—might be identified as tragic. Marx claims that a tragic stage of history must be overturned by a revolutionary comedy. We will read political philosophers of comedy as well as political comedies to explore contrasting models of political revolution and social reformation. We will specifically consider two forms of revolutionary comedy found in contemporary post-Marxist philosophy. Is revolution history’s shrill laughter that shatters a tragic stage of history? Or is the repeated failure of revolution history’s comic stutter through which tragedy repeats itself comically. Guiding themes: political affect, political satire, social performativity, historical repetition, and revolution.

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice.

 

32734 PHI 2450-001 CATHOLIC SOCIAL THOUGHT                                   TR 4:00-5:15 Duska

Catholic Social Thought  (CST) rooted in the Christian narrative and developed over the last 135 years will present the Catholic teachings on the nature of social justice and its requirements.  CST will discuss the Catholic account of what it means to be human and of what we ought to be doing with our lives. This class will examine central principles of CST (e.g. human dignity, rights and responsibilities, the common good, the nature of the family,  the preferential option for the poor, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the dignity of work, ).  It will include a sustained critique and where applicable appreciation of views that shape, our culture such as Individualism, relativism, socialism, capitalism and the effects of technological advancement.  We will read primary texts, found largely in the Papal encyclicals, secondary reflections, and evaluate contemporary social and economic challenges in order to demonstrate the richness of the CST tradition and its potential for finding a more promising way toward a society that embodies “justice for all.”

ATTRIBUTES: Ethics, Peace & Justice.

 

32000 PSC 2220-001 INTERNATIONAL LAW                                                   TR 4:00-5:15 Schrad

The rules and principles of international law based on a study of treaties, diplomatic practice, and cases dealt with by international and national courts. An investigation of the development of international law, its core features and approaches, based on an examination of treaties, diplomatic practice, and changing normative dynamics as evidenced through national and international courts to more fully understand its roles as both an instrument of, and a constraint on, the actions of states.

ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Peace and Justice.

 

32001 PSC 2230-001 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION                        MWF 9:30-10:20 Suzuki

This course explores the roles that international organizations play in international politics.  After examining contending theoretical perspectives on the impact and importance of international organizations in world politics, the course investigates the historical evolution, activities, and performance of specific organizations in the primary policy areas of peace, security, trade, finance, economic development, human rights, and humanitarian assistance.  Among the central questions are as follows:

• Why and how were they created, and by whom?

• What roles were they originally expected to play in international politics and if those functions have changed over time, how and why?

•  How does each organization contribute to and impact on their particular areas of concern?

• What factors shape the depth, breadth, scope, and effectiveness of these contributions?
 ATTRIBUTES: Core Social Science, Peace & Justice.

 

31850 PA 6000-001 VOCATION of PUBLIC  SERVICE                                  MW 1:30-2:45  Perun

The course takes students through an exploration of the concept of public service as a “vocation,” envisioning public service as a means of self-expression through which citizen-servants discover meaning and purpose in their lives by promoting the common good as well as forging and developing the bonds of community among a body of diverse people.  This concept is contextualized in the “real-life” choices made by and the experiences of public servants.
ATTRIBUTES: Peace & Justice.

 

32167 SOC 4200-001 SPORTS and SOCIETY                                              MWF 8:30-9:20 Eckstein

32168 SOC 4200-002 SPORTS and SOCIETY                                             MWF 9:30-10:20 Eckstein
Sport, like other social institutions -- such as the family, religion, and education—shapes and directs our thoughts and behaviors.  It is more than just playing games. A sociological examination of sports tries to unravel the positive and negative values that sports reflect, and how these values contribute to or inhibit social justice in our world.  This class will take a “critical” view of sports.  This does not mean that everything about sports is bad.  Rather, being critical means refusing to romanticize sports (and athletes) and instead be willing to pierce through the sometimes haughty rhetoric in order to uncover a less glorified reality.

ATTRIBUTES:Core Social Science, Gender & Women's Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 2.

 

32217 SPA 2993-001 COMMUNITY INTERPRETER INTERNSHIP MW 4:30-5:45 Hidalgo Nava                                                                                                                         

The course is designed for undergraduate students with advanced proficiency in Spanish who seek to apply and improve   their   linguistic   and   cultural   competencies   in   a   real-world   setting. This course   in   community interpretation prepares the interns to be verbal interpreters and/or translators of (oral and written) documents, from English to Spanish or vice versa,  by introducing  them  to  the  basic  theory  and  strategies  for  written  translation  and  oral interpretation. This includes an introduction to two-way interpretation, consecutive interpretation, general and legal translation, and specific linguistic areas relevant to the needs of the Law School Clinic clients. Through hands-on practice and exercises, the interns develop the fundamental analytical, cognitive, and linguistic skills that are essential for written translation, and two interpretation modes (consecutive and sight translation). This community-based learning course allows the student intern to use his/her Spanish abilities while helping law students to serve the Latino community in Southeastern Pennsylvania. As part of the course, students will enhance their consciousness about the unfair conditions many immigrants need to face while they struggle to start a new life in the US and to provide for their families and themselves. Students will have the opportunity to be in contact with the immigrant Latino community and, as a consequence of that interaction, they will develop a greater understanding about their situation, along with more compassion and tolerance.                       

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 1.

 

32219 SPA 3412-001 HUMAN RIGHTS in LATIN AMERICA           MW 1:30-2:45 Hidalgo Nava

This course focuses on the intersection between human rights advocacy and the various cultural forms that explicitly attempt to participate in human rights discourse. We will study novels, movies, photography, testimonials, poetry, plays, paintings, comics, etc. that reflect on the atrocities of human rights violations in Latin America from colonial times to our days. The course will deal with topics such as the European conquest and the resulting enslavement of the original peoples of the Americas and Africa; the role of the Inquisition in prohibiting free speech and religious freedom; the overexploitation of the land and workers by foreign companies with the consent and aid of local governments; the Guatemalan genocide of the 1980s; the dictatorships in the Dominican Republic and South America; Latin American immigration; the dirty war and forced disappearances in various countries; violence against women, etc. We will focus on the ethical and aesthetical aspects of human rights storytelling and artistic representations. This course examines a range of   human rights stories through a balance of context and close reading, where stories are studied both for what they say and how they say it.

ATTRIBUTES: Cultural Studies, Latin American Studies, Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

 

32221 SPA 3412-003 LITERATURE, POLITICS, and SOCIAL CONFLICTS
                                                                                                                             TR 11:30-12:45 Trujillo
Latin American Narrative has always been closely tied to historical moments and to the political and social conflicts of the times.  Events, characters and situations depicted in short stories, novels, and films relate to specific aspects of urban and country living, as well as unique circumstances and vision of the world. This seminar will analyze some of the major novels and short stories of Latin America from the second half of the 20th Century contextualized by political, economic, social, and cultural changes of the American Continent from the second half of the 20th Century onwards. The reading selection of this course will offer students diverse views of the uses and abuses the of political and economical power and the resulting oppression and violence.
In the class discussions issues of human rights and mechanisms of oppression will be discussed in general terms, as well as specifically in historic moments, such as the Rosas dictatorship in Argentina (1835-52), the Mexican Revolution (1910-20), the Cristero wars (1926-29), the Colombian civil wars known as “la violencia: (1948-60’s), and finally the Pinochet dictatorship in Chile (1973-69).
Students will be exposed to and will generate critical analysis of the representation of power and resistance in all forms, which will be the basis of the scrutiny of the literary and filmic material in class.
ATTRIBUTES: Latin American Studies requirement, Peace & Justice.

 

 

32754 THL 3310-001 CHRISTIAN PRACTICES of BEAUTY                                  MW 4:30-5:45 Hanchin  

In his novel The Idiot, Dostoevsky drops the enigmatic phrase: “Beauty will save the world.” What might this mean? Swiss theologian Hans Urs von Balthasar contends that the eclipse of beauty in the West leads to a world riddled with moral and aesthetic relativism, the production of violence, and escalating ecological crisis. This course will explore Christian practices of beauty, ancient and new, as prophetic resistance to dominating consumeristic, individualistic, and technocratic tendencies of trans-Atlantic culture. In particular, we will investigate the theology of the icon in the Eastern Orthodox tradition; the liberative aesthetic praxis of Latin American liberation theology; and the emergent ecological theology. These theologies of encounter illuminate the foundational importance of Christian praxis for Christian theology. If beauty can help redeem the world in our time, its existence will be affirmed as more than merely “in the eye of the beholder.”

ATTRIBUTES: Core Theology, Peace & Justice.

 

32526 THL 3740-001 LIBERATION THEOLOGY                                            TR 8:30-9:45 Purcaro

This course is designed for students in the Service Learning Community.  Fr. Art  is an Augustinian who served with the poorest of the poor in Peru for 30 years.  He brings a wealth of experience and love for the poor to this course.  Liberation Theology calls us to see how the poor are marginalized by society, describes how to  work among them in order to  advocate on their behalf, and most importantly to use what we have in order for the poor to  find their power so they can advocate for themselves. Liberation Theology proposes that Christ desires to free our fellow human beings from the social structures that keep them impoverished. St Augustine stated: You give bread to a hungry person; but it would be better were no one hungry, and you could give it to no one. (Tractate 1 John 8,8)   This course will examine the role of Charity and the pursuit of Justice, as well as how we think about and work with and for the poor.

ATTRIBUTES: Core Theology, Cultural Studies, Peace & Justice.

 

32297 THL 3790-002 LATIN AMERICAN  THEOLOGIES                        TR 8:30-9:45 Ashworth

In this course we will explore the most important voices in Christian theology in Latin America, as well as among Latinas and Latinos living in the United States. We will discuss such topics as conquest, racial identity, the nature of salvation, the mission of the church, Marxism, and feminism. We begin by investigating the original encounter between European Christians and Indigenous peoples in the Americas, then spend the majority of the course on Latin American liberation theologies (and responses to them) in the twentieth century, before concluding with Latino and Latina authors residing in the U.S.

ATTRIBUTES: Core Theology, Peace & Justice, Diversity 3.

 

32300 THL 4320-001 MARKETS & MORALITY                                              MW 3:00-4:15 Beyer     

Do market economies promote or stifle human welfare, freedom, and the common good?  What does Christian discipleship require in the marketplace? This course will consider these questions by utilizing sources in Christian ethics, Catholic social thought, economics, and other disciplines. In addition to these broader issues, we will explore specific topics such as globalization, consumerism, the nature and kinds of capitalism, socialist critiques of the market economy, poverty and its relationship to race and gender, worker justice, economic rights and the impact of the economy on the environment.  
ATTRIBUTES: Core Theology, Peace & Justice.

P&J Course Catalog

Please note that not all of the courses listed below will be available during the current semester.
Please check with the Center as to the availability of a particular class.

Past Catalogs

Fall 2016  |  Spring 2017

Fall 2015  |  Spring 2016

Fall 2014  |  Spring 2015

Fall 2013  |  Spring 2014

Fall 2012  |  Spring 2013

Fall 2011  |  Spring 2012

                |  Spring 2011