Intro Level Core Courses

HON 1000-001, 1003-001, 1005-001 INTERDISC II (LIT, THL, PSC)

MARK SCHIFFMAN, KEVIN HUGHES, HEIDI ROSE
MWF 10:30-11:20 AM, MWF 11:30-12:20 PM, W 3:00-3:50 PM

The Interdisc sequence of courses presents students with a unique opportunity to engage the deepest and most fundamental questions that lie at the root of human experience through intensive engagement with classic texts and artifacts in a collaborative interdisciplinary environment. The second semester of Interdisc explores the ‘greater Middle Ages’ and Early Modernity, from the waning of the Roman Empire to the edge of the French Revolution. The three sections of the course work in relationship throughout the semester, considering both alignments and tensions among the texts we study. We also will ask how questions are formulated, what counts as evidence, and the goals of analysis in the three disciplines that constitute this year's version of Interdisc II: literature, theology, and political science. Written work includes 3 short papers for each discipline, as well as brief informal assignments throughout the semester. The course also includes 3 oral exams (each encompassing all three strands).


HON 1000-001
Interdisc Humanities I: PHI 
MARK SCHIFFMAN

Course description forthcoming.


HON 1003-001
Interdis Hum I: THL  
Kevin Hughes

Course description forth coming.

 

HON 1005-001
Interdisc Hum I 
Heidi Rose

In this course students are introduced to the fundamental relationship between text and performance, and between literature and speech. Ancient Greece gives us a context from which to examine: 1) the stories we tell and both why and how we tell them, 2) how theatre developed, and 3) the power of performance in human life and society. The analysis of character, language, myth, image, rhythm, form, style, and culture is grounded in studying what makes these texts inherently theatrical, how they spoke to the audiences of their time, and how they continue to speak to contemporary audiences. The texts are experienced from page to stage. Prior performance experience is not at all necessary--only a love of language and literature, openness to exploring different parts of yourself, imagination, and some hard creative and intellectual work!

 

Students will be pre-registered.

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HON 1007-001 Interdisc Humanities III

JAMES IJAMES
R 4:00-5:15 PM

Course description forthcoming.

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ACS 1000-H01 ANCIENTS

BRIAN SATTERFIELD
MW 3:00-4:15 PM

(P&S) Course description forthcoming.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H02 ANCIENTS (GTB Cohort)

PAUL CAMACHO
MWF 12:30-1:20 PM

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

 

Restricted to Honors students in the Good Cohort 

 

 

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ACS 1000-H03 ANCIENTS (GTB Cohort)

TBD
MWF 12:30-1:20 PM

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

 

Restricted to Honors students in the Good Cohort

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ACS 1000-H04 ANCIENTS (GTB Cohort)

MARK SHIFFMAN
MWF 12:30-1:20 PM

The question of the good is implied in the questions “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course revolves around questions in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  Since it addresses foundational questions, “The Good” course is a fitting introduction to the learning cohort sequence on transcendental grounding principles.  Readings include selections from Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes and Leo Tolstoy.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

 

Restricted to Honors students in the Good Cohort

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ACS 1000-H06 ANCIENTS (PPE COHORT)

GENE MCCARRAHER
MWF 12:30-1:20 PM

Course description forthcoming.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H07 ANCIENTS (BUSINESS & SOCIETY COHORT)

GREG HOSKINS
MW 1:30-2:45 PM

Course description forthcoming.

Open only to cohort students; students will be pre-registered.

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ACS 1000-H08 ANCIENTS

CATHY STAPLES
TR 8:30-9:45 PM

Close reading and discussion of selected texts from the time of Homer through the English Renaissance. In this seminar you will learn to read closely and with care. Weekly journals, free-writing and mark-ups of the text will help you to refine your own critical and sometimes creative responses to the reading. Writing will be intensive, with emphasis placed on revision and on the discovery of a process which works best for you as an individual writer. As many of the works we study have oral origins, we’ll begin with a close look at a narrative that has come down to us through purely oral channels, weighing memory, imagination, and cultural intention. Our readings will be close and full of good inquiries. Whether we are contemplating Achilles’ rage, the spiritual journeys of Augustine and Dante, or “the unstable fictions of gender” in Shakespeare—we will explore the impact of narrative choices, imagery, word choice, and tone. Plan on lively discussion and active daily participation. Course texts will include Homer’s Iliad, Augustine’s Confesssions, Dante’s Inferno, Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, and Shakespeare’s As You Like It as well as poetry by Sappho, Erinna, Alkaios, Simonides and other ancient lyric poets. The class includes a trip to Philadelphia Museum of Art as well as a movie night.

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ACS 1000-H09 ANCIENTS

MICHAEL THOMPSON
MWF 9:30-10:20 AM

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the intellectual life and spiritual values found within the traditions of the western humanities. The essential question posed by the humanities is, “What does it mean to be human?” The central question posed by this ACS honors seminar is “Who am I?” In many ways there is no viable and plausible response for the former without addressing the latter. In New& Collected Poems 2001, the poet Czeslaw Milosz claims that the purpose of poetry is to remind us how difficult it is to remain just one person. We will attempt to address the concept of “person” and “Who Am I” through reading, studying and discussing some of the central works of the Western humanities tradition in the modern period. We will be guided in our task by the insights of the Christian theologian and philosopher St. Augustine of Hippo. St. Augustine confronted Milosz’s dilemma in choosing his own life’s meaning. We will evaluate his choice in conjunction with the alternatives he faced and the resolution of the meaning of his life. The center piece of our readings will be St. Augustine’s Confessions, additionally with: Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Antigone, Plato’s Apology, Dante’s Inferno and Machiavelli’s Prince. St. Augustine claims that you are confronted with the choice of becoming whoever you are to be. This choice can be ignored but its consequences cannot be avoided.  Choosing who you are concerns relationships between the development of individual identity, truth, and the influences of those factors which you cannot easily change, or possibly not at all, in your life, such as codes of expected behavior, the implications of transgression and the force of contextual, social, political, economic and historical circumstances. The ancient contexts of Greek and Roman tragedy situate the problem of being human in a distinctive manner which still influences western culture. We will attempt to bring clarity and understanding to these complex interactions.

We will also continue your education in some of the skills necessary for professional life. These include thinking and writing in a critical, clear, coherent, well -reasoned and substantive manner. To continue to improve your capacity to understand and formulate deductive, inductive and dialectical arguments; the methods and techniques for analysis and evaluation of complex thought processes; the capacity to read and understand complex prose and argument; the means to formulate and articulate ideas clear-ly,substantively, and in a compelling manner.

The format for our seminar will be, primarily student commentary, with discussion of texts and assigned questions. I will lecture periodically. 

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EGR 1200-H01 INTERDISC PROJECT 1

A. WELKER & N. COMOLLI
R 6:10-8:50 PM/ F 2:30-3:30 PM

COURSE DESCRIPTION FORTHCOMING.

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ENG 1975-H01 BEAUTY

MICHAEL TOMKO
TR 10:00-11:15 AM

“What beauty saves the world?”—Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Where do we find the beautiful?  How does an encounter with beauty change us?  Does it move us to love and to justice?  Or does it mislead and seduce us?  Does beauty walk rightly with goodness and truth, or do philosophical and theological concerns distract and deaden the artist or the lover?  These questions will guide our inquiry into the beautiful across disciplines and across centuries.  We will read literary works by Dante, T.S. Eliot, Keats, Oscar Wilde, James Baldwin, Wallace Stevens, Flannery O’Connor and Karen Blixen and attend to visual and musical encounters with the beautiful.  We will pursue the contested interpretations of beauty among thinkers such as Plato, Pater, and Aquinas, as well as more recent assessments by Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and Iris Murdoch.  With these great minds, we attempt to solve the mystery of whether beauty really can save the world. 

 Restricted to students in the Global Scholars Humanities and Good True Beautiful Cohorts.

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ENG 1975-H02 BEAUTY

HELENA TOMKO
TR 10:00-11:15 AM

“What beauty saves the world?”—Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Where do we find the beautiful?  How does an encounter with beauty change us?  Does it move us to love and to justice?  Or does it mislead and seduce us?  Does beauty walk rightly with goodness and truth, or do philosophical and theological concerns distract and deaden the artist or the lover?  These questions will guide our inquiry into the beautiful across disciplines and across centuries.  We will read literary works by Dante, T.S. Eliot, Keats, Oscar Wilde, James Baldwin, Wallace Stevens, Flannery O’Connor and Karen Blixen and attend to visual and musical encounters with the beautiful.  We will pursue the contested interpretations of beauty among thinkers such as Plato, Pater, and Aquinas, as well as more recent assessments by Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and Iris Murdoch.  With these great minds, we attempt to solve the mystery of whether beauty really can save the world. 

 

 Restricted to students in the Global Scholars Humanities and Good True Beautiful Cohorts.

 

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ENG 1975-H03 BEAUTY

REBECCA CHERICO
TR 10:00-11:15 AM

“What beauty saves the world?”—Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Where do we find the beautiful?  How does an encounter with beauty change us?  Does it move us to love and to justice?  Or does it mislead and seduce us?  Does beauty walk rightly with goodness and truth, or do philosophical and theological concerns distract and deaden the artist or the lover?  These questions will guide our inquiry into the beautiful across disciplines and across centuries.  We will read literary works by Dante, T.S. Eliot, Keats, Oscar Wilde, James Baldwin, Wallace Stevens, Flannery O’Connor and Karen Blixen and attend to visual and musical encounters with the beautiful.  We will pursue the contested interpretations of beauty among thinkers such as Plato, Pater, and Aquinas, as well as more recent assessments by Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and Iris Murdoch.  With these great minds, we attempt to solve the mystery of whether beauty really can save the world. 

 Restricted to students in the Global Scholars Humanities and Good True Beautiful Cohorts.

 

 

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ENG 1975-H04 WIDE SKY & LONG GREEN

CATHY STAPLES
TR 1:00-2:15 PM

What do modern day organic farming, bee-keeping, and bird-banding have to do with country life and the concept of the pastoral as seen in poetry, prose, and fiction ranging from Virgil, Wordsworth, Thoreau and Frost to Henry Beston, Annie Dillard, Seamus Heaney, Maxine Kumin, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Claudia Emerson and Rick Bass? Is the desire to live and work deliberately and simply in the natural world an idealized notion, is it full of harsh realities and rural truths? Is it both? What is the nature of contentment? The course relies on primary texts and invites close reading of these texts through a variety of writing forms. The three field trips to Rushton Farm will be occasions for writing, for deepening the semester-long inquiry into the pastoral tradition. As we tour Rushton farm and hear Fred DeLong and Noah Kress speak about the challenges and joys of farming, we’ll begin to understand the conscientious farmers of Virgil’s Georgics. When ornithologist Lisa Ziziuk places a newly banded warbler or saw-whet into your hands for a moment before its release, you’ll glimpse something Frost often labors to show us: the intimacy between the human and the wild. 

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PHI 1000-H01 KNOWLEDGE, REALITY, SELF

YANNIK THEIM
TR 11:30-12:45 PM

In this class we will tarry with some of the big philosophical questions: What is philosophy, and how might we use it in the world? How are truth, facts, and opinion different? How can we tell the difference? What is knowledge and how do we acquire it? How do social norms shape, limit, and enable our sense of the world and ourselves? Why are these questions important to ask in the first place?  

Rather than trying to settle on definitive answers, this seminar will cultivate a process of open-ended collective inquiry in which students will be encouraged to think autonomously and challenge facile solutions. The material covered will include ancient, Christian, modern and contemporary sources, as well as texts from beyond the canonized—and largely white, male, European—history of philosophy. Taking multiple perspectives will allow us to reflect critically on the assumptions that we inherit through our own traditions and that remain largely invisible to us.

Students should come away from the course with an expanded sense of how we grapple with philosophical issues all the time in our everyday lives and with a sense of having an enlarged set of critical tools at their hands for creative and rigorous thinking.

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PHI 1000-H02 KNOWLEDGE, REALITY, SELF

WALTER BROGAN
MW 1:30-2:45 AM

In this course, we will study some of the great authors of the history of philosophy such as Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Marx, and Freud.  Among the philosophical areas we will cover will be: philosophical principles about reality, foundations of just law, principles of morality, theories of knowledge, theories about the ideal society, proofs for God's existence, etc. Since it is a core course, we will focus on developing an understanding of the methods and aims of philosophical thinking. The basic questions we will ask are: "What does it mean to be political and rational beings?  What is the ideal community for human beings?" This seminar-style class will aim to encourage sharing ideas and insights and expect that each of us will seriously confront the texts and ideas we encounter.

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PHI 1000-H03 KNOWLEDGE, REALITY, SELF

FARSHID BAGHAI
TR 1:00-2:15 PM

Course description forthcoming.

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PHI 1000-H04 KNOWLEDGE, REALITY, SELF

TBD
MW 3:00-4:15 PM

Course description forthcoming.

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PHI 1000-H05 KNOWLEDGE, REALITY, SELF

JOHN CARVAHLO
TR 2:30-3:45 PM

Rather than providing a selective survey of the history of philosophy or undertaking an analysis of the various and distinct ways philosophy has been studied and practiced in the West since the time of the ancient Greeks, this course will explore possible answers to questions philosophers have asked from ancient times to the present, namely, how is knowledge of the world and ourselves possible, and how do we know that we know? 

 

These questions bring together a healthy skepticism: How do I know? • and a robust epistemology •  How do I know? •  which are trademarks of what we call Philosophy. The centrality of these questions for Philosophy makes them appropriate for an introduction to this subject. The active testing, in class discussions, of reasons for accepting or rejecting answers to these questions introduces students to the practice of philosophizing. This practice includes an evaluation of the answers proposed as they might be realized in our own lives and the lives of others.

 

The specific goal of this course is to position the classical Greek and Christian philosophical traditions in relation to contemporary problems in the philosophy of mind. Setting anchor in the 17th century separation of the mind B which knows what is true B from the body B which is the source of error, we establish the classical Greek and Christian foundations for this view and explore some 20th and 21st century claims for a more seamless connection between the mind, the body and the environment which challenge that view. In this context, we consider how discipline makes bodies the sites of knowledge and truths that delimit what it is permissible to know. What might we know were we to successfully reject that discipline? In the course of this exploration, students learn to master the art of making and evaluating arguments in their abstract articulation as philosophical theories, in the flesh as they might be realized in our experience generally, and in their concrete expression in the lives of individual human beings.

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PSC 1200-H01 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

LANCE KENNEY
TR 10:00 AM-11:15 PM

This course is an introduction to the study of international relations (IR), a distinct academic discipline that involves elements of political science, history, economics, sociology, and philosophy. The aim is to present the key concepts, theories, and paradigms that shape and influence world politics. Simply reporting on contemporary international events is NOT the goal: evaluating and critically assessing those events IS the goal.

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PSC 1200-H02 INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

LANCE KENNEY
TR 11:30 AM-12:45 PM

This course is an introduction to the study of international relations (IR), a distinct academic discipline that involves elements of political science, history, economics, sociology, and philosophy. The aim is to present the key concepts, theories, and paradigms that shape and influence world politics. Simply reporting on contemporary international events is NOT the goal: evaluating and critically assessing those events IS the goal.

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PSY 1000-H01 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

REBECCA BRAND
TR 11:30 AM-12:20 PM

This is an introductory examination of the fundamental concepts of psychology, with particular emphasis on the description of normal human behavior and those factors that underlie it.  Topics include neuropsychology, memory, development, social influence, and more.  The course is taught as part-lecture, part-seminar.  Students will read and discuss primary source articles in addition to text material.  Assessments include quizzes, homeworks, two papers, and two exams.

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THL 1000-H01 FAITH, REASON, AND CULTURE

ANTHONY GODZIEBA
TR 8:30-9:45 AM

    This course studies the basic elements of the Christian faith tradition and their connection to our contemporary context, using the method of critical theological reflection.

    How should we approach this introductory course?  It’s hard to know because of three important factors: the participants all have varying backgrounds and attitudes with regard to religion; a course on religion or Christian theology taught within the university is probably different from any other study of religion that the participants have ever done; and our contemporary Western culture, which is the context for our study and which is made up of so many diverse factors and interests, argues many times against the meaningfulness of those same religious realities that we want to examine in this course.

      Any theology course which doesn’t take these points into account is doomed even before it starts.  To have a productive course, then, it may look as though we have to handle just about everything.  But we only have a semester, and we can handle only a limited number of topics.  I would suggest these as a way to gain insight into the basic issues:

(1) a brief diagnosis of contemporary Western culture, looking especially at its relationship to religious experience and to Christianity in particular;

(2) an examination of the character and tasks of Christian theology;

(3) a study of the biblical Jesus, and the ethical effect that Jesus has on the lived experience of those who commit themselves to discipleship (following Jesus and the God of Jesus);

(4) a study of some of the basic faith claims of Christianity (the nature of faith and revelation, the Christian doctrine of God, salvation/redemption/liberation, the Christian view of the human person), along with selected contemporary applications, showing how these claims relate to everyday lived experience, with its social, political, and economic concerns.

      The course requirements are personal and active presence at all class sessions, one research assignment (between 2 and 4 printed, double-spaced pages in length), one class presentation, two interim tests (first quarter and third quarter of the course), a mid-term exam, and a final exam.

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THL 1000-H02 FAITH, REASON, AND CULTURE

KERRY SAN CHIRICO
TR 11:30-12:45 PM

"As an integral part of the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, this foundational course introduces students to the rich living tradition of Christianity: the sources, traditions, practices, and major thinkers that have shaped Christianity’s responses to the fundamental human questions that  shape the human search for meaning."

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THL 1000-H03 FAITH, REASON, AND CULTURE

GERALD BEYER
MW 1:30-2:45 PM

As an integral part of the Arts and Sciences Core Curriculum, this foundational course introduces students to the rich living tradition of Christianity: the sources, traditions, practices, and major thinkers that have shaped Christianity’s response to the fundamental human questions that underlie all religions and shape the human search for meaning. With a particular focus on Roman Catholicism, students engage Christianity as a living tradition of beliefs and practices that have developed over time in local and global cultural and religious contexts and that, loyal to the living God to which they point, are ready to be transformed again. Students also engage Christian truth-claims, themes, values, and witness as resources for analyzing and critically evaluating contemporary cultural challenges. In this course, students are equipped to appreciate the ongoing quest of Christian faith seeking understanding as it enters into conversation with all human knowledge and experience, including other faith traditions.     

In particular, this course will consider the link between theological doctrines and ethics.  It considers the classic theological doctrines and ritual practices of the Catholic tradition, while attending to their political, social, and economic implications. It examines contemporary formulations of theological questions, with exposure to historical perspectives. By underscoring the relationship between theological beliefs and their significance for personal and communal life, students will grasp the public relevance of the Christian tradition. 

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THL 1000-H04 FAITH, REASON, AND CULTURE

STAFF
MWF 9:30-10:20AM

Course description forth coming.

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THL 1000-H05 FAITH, REASON, AND CULTURE

STAFF
MWF 10:30-11:20 PM

Course description forth coming.

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Thrive. Transform. Succeed.

Honors Program Brochure

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Contact Us

Villanova University
Garey Hall 106
800 Lancaster Ave.
Villanova, PA 19085
Phone: 610.519.4650
Fax: 610.519.5405