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Marita Bonner

Marita Bonner
Marita Bonner

Biography:

  • 1899    Marita Odette Bonner (Occomy) was born on June 16 in Boston, Massachusetts.
  • Marita grew up in Brookline, a suburb of Boston
  • Marita attended Brookline High School; at Brookline High School:
    • She took an interest in writing and began to write
    • She became involved in the Sagamor, a student organized magazine
    • She was known for being a talented pianist
  • 1918    Marita graduated from Brookline High School
  • 1918    Marita enrolled in Radcliffe College in Cambridge, Massachusetts; at Radcliffe: 
    • She was forced to commute from home to school because African American students were not allowed to live in campus dormitories.
    • She majored in Comparative Literature and English and studied German and Music Composition.  She won two music competitions.
    • She founded the Boston-area chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.
  • 1922    Marita graduated from Radcliffe and began teaching at Bluefield Colored Institute (now Bluefield State University) in Bluefield, West Virginia
  • 1924    She left West Virginia and took a teaching position Armstrong High School in Washington, D.C., (an all-black school)
  • 1925    Marita wrote her first essay, "On Being Young - A Woman - And Colored" (published in The Crisis Magazine, December 1925. The essay focused on the discrimination of African American women)
  • 1925-1930       Marita wrote a series of short stories that were published in the following magazines: The Crisis, Opportunity, and the National Urban League.
  • 1941    Marita returned to teaching (now in the Chicago area public schools) and stopped writing to spend more time with her husband and three children.
  • 1963    Marita retired from teaching
  • 1971    Marita Bonner dies due to complications from smoke inhalation (after a fire in her Chicago home)

Biography information obtained from: http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/bonner-marita-odette-1899-1971

List of Marita’s Work:                        

Short Stories:

1925    “The Hands - A Story.” Opportunity 3 (Aug 1925): 235-237.

1926    “The Prison-Bound.” Crisis 32 (Sep 1926): 225-226.

1926    “Nothing New.” Crisis 33 (Nov 1926): 17-20.

1927    “One Boy's Story.”  Crisis 34 (Nov 1927): 297-299, 316-320 (used the pseudonym Joseph Maree Andrew).

1927    “Drab Rambles.” Crisis 34 (Dec 1927): 335-336, 354-356.

1933    “A Possible Triad of Black Notes, Part One.” Opportunity 11 (Jul 1933): 205-207.

1933    “A Possible Triad of Black Notes, Part Two: Of Jimmie Harris.” Opportunity 11 (Aug 1933): 242-244.

1933    “A Possible Triad of Black Notes, Part Three: Three Tales of Living Corner Store.” Opportunity 11 (Sep 1933): 269-271.

1934    “Tin Can.” Opportunity 12 (Jul 1934): 202-205, (Aug 1934): 236-240.

1936    “A Sealed Pod.” Opportunity 14 (Mar 1936): 88-91.

1938    “Black Fronts.” Opportunity 16 (Jul 1938): 210-214.

1938    “Hate is Nothing.” Crisis 45 (Dec 1938): 388-390, 394, 403-404 (used the pseudonym Joyce M. Reed).

1939    “The Makin's.” Opportunity 17 (Jan 1939): 18-21.

1939    “The Whipping.” Crisis 46 (Jan 1939): 172-174.

1939    “Hongry Fire.” Crisis 46 (Dec 1939): 360-362, 376-377.

1940    “Patch Quilt.” Crisis 47 (Mar 1940): 71, 72, 92.

1941    “One True Love.”  Crisis 48 (February 1941): 46-47, 58-59.

Essays:

1925    “On Being Young - A Woman - and Colored.” Crisis 31 (Dec. 1925): 63-65.

1928    “The Young Blood Hungers.” Crisis 35 (May 1928): 151, 172.

1929    “Review of Autumn Love Cycle, by Georgia Douglas Johnson.” Opportunity 7 (Apr 1929): 130.

Drama:

1927    The Pot-Maker (A Play to be Read). Opportunity 5 (Feb 1927): 43-46.

1928    The Purple Flower. Crisis 35 (Jan 1928): 202-07.

1929    Exit - An Illusion. Crisis 36 (Oct 1929): 335-336,352.

Collections:

1987    Flynn, Joyce, and Joyce O. Stricklin. Eds. Frye Street and Environs: The Collected Works    of Marita Bonner. Beacon: Boston, 1987.

Additional Information:

http://www.thecrisismagazine.com/
      (Oldest Black Periodical -Founded by William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, in 1910, and became the crusading voice for civil rights.)

African American History Timeline:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/aaworld/timeline.html

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/reconstruction/index.html

http://www.naacphistory.org/#/home

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cakewalk