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Turning Points in History: 2021-2022 Virtual Event Series

All the events are ACS approved for Villanova University students

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WWI AND THE MAKING OF MODERN DIASPORAS

Wednesday, November 17, 2021, 6-7:30pm ET

The aftermath of WWI was a turning point in the modern history of involuntary migration, mass displacement, and global diasporas. Why did WWI displace so many people? What was the international response to the mass displacement of people after the war, and how did it contribute to the development of modern refugee relief efforts?

Speakers:

  • Dr. Emily Baughan, Lecturer in 19th/20th Century British History, University of Sheffield
  • Dr. Reena Goldthree, Assistant Professor of African American Studies, Princeton University
  • Dr. Ronald Suny, William H. Sewell Jr. Distinguished University Professor of History and Professor of Political Science, University of Michigan

Moderated by Dr. Adele Lindenmeyr, Professor of History and Dean of CLAS, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by the Department of Global Interdisciplinary Studies, Villanova University

Left to right: Dr. Emily Baughan, Dr. Reena Goldthree and Dr. Ronald Suny
Left to right: Dr. Emily Baughan, Dr. Reena Goldthree and Dr. Ronald Suny

PAST EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 2021: CLIMATE CHANGE

TURNING POINTS IN HISTORY WITH DIPESH CHAKRABARTY 

Wednesday, September 8, 2021, 6:00-7:30pm ET

The Lepage Center kicks off its 2021-2022 event series with a keynote address by Professor Dipesh Chakrabarty (University of Chicago). In this inaugural event, Prof. Chakrabarty will explore of what a turning point in history is and discuss his recent work on climate change and the Anthropocene.

Prof. Dipesh Chakrabarty is the Lawrence A. Kimpton Distinguished Service Professor of History, South Asian Languages and Civilizations, and the College at the University of Chicago. He holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Law. His books include Provincializing Europe: Postcolonial Thought and Historical Difference (2000; 2008). His most recent book, The Climate of History in a Planetary Age was published in March 2021 by the University of Chicago Press. He currently serves as the Faculty Director for the University's Center in Delhi.
 

Moderated by Dr. Elizabeth Kolsky, Director, Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest, Villanova University.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Irish Studies and the Center for Arab and Islamic Studies, Villanova University

Headshot of Prof. Dipesh Chakrabarty

INDIGENOUS PERSPECTIVES ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Wednesday, September 22, 2021, 6-7:30pm ET

Indigenous peoples around the world are particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. How have Indigenous scholars’ historical and cultural perspectives contributed to conversations about climate change? How do Indigenous perspectives powerfully shape national and international climate justice movements?

Speakers:

  • Dr. Clint Carroll, Associate Professor of Native American and Indigenous Studies, Department of Ethnic Studies, University of Colorado-Boulder
  • Dr. Elizabeth Hoover, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California Berkeley
  • Dr. Daniel Wildcat, Professor and Director of the Environmental Research Studies Center, Haskell Indian Nations University

Moderated by Dr. Paul Rosier, Mary M. Birle Chair in American History, Department of History, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by the Department of Geography and the Environment, Villanova University

Headshots of Dr. Daniel Wildcat, Dr. Elizabeth Hoover and Dr. Clint Carroll
Left to right: Dr. Clint Carroll, Dr. Elizabeth Hoover, Dr. Daniel Wildcat

WHITE SUPREMACY AND CLASSICAL ATHENS: A TURNING POINT? 

Wednesday, October 6, 2021, 6-7:30 pm ET

White supremacist groups often fetishize ancient Sparta, but how and why are they also drawing on classical Athens? Are we witnessing a “turning point” in how white supremacists use ancient Greek societies as historical models?

Speakers:

Moderated by Dr. Eliza Gettel, Albert R. Lepage Assistant Professor of History, Department of History, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by the Classical Studies Program, Villanova University

Left to right: Dr. Curtis Dozier, Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy and Dr. Jackie Murray
Left to right: Dr. Curtis Dozier, Dr. Rebecca Futo Kennedy and Dr. Jackie Murray

OCTOBER 2021: WHITE SUPREMACY

GLOBAL HISTORIES OF WHITE SUPREMACY

Wednesday, October 27, 2021, 6-7:30 pm ET

As the world watched in shock, white supremacists stormed the U.S. Capitol Building on January 6, 2021. Was this a “turning point” in history? How are the actions and ambitions of contemporary white supremacists shaped by modern histories of anti-Black and anti-Asian racism and the historical ambition in “white man’s countries” to create a world order based on racial domination and exclusion?

Speakers:

  • Dr. Kathleen Belew, Assistant Professor of US History and the College, University of Chicago
  • Dr. Duncan Bell, Professor of Political Thought and International Relations, University of Cambridge
  • Dr. Mae Ngai, Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and Professor of History, and Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race, Columbia University

Moderated by Dr. Vincent Lloyd, Associate Professor, Christian Ethics and Theories & Methods of Culture, and Director of the Africana Studies Program, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by the Africana Studies Program, the Asian Studies Program, the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, and the CLAS Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, Villanova University

Left to right: Dr. Kathleen Belew, Dr. Duncan Bell, Dr. Mae Ngai
Left to right: Dr. Kathleen Belew, Dr. Duncan Bell, Dr. Mae Ngai

NOVEMBER 2021: MIGRATION AND DISPLACEMENT

MIGRATIONS ACROSS CENTRAL AMERICA

Wednesday, November 3, 2021, 6-7:30pm ET

How do histories of migratory movements and policies in Central America shape the current immigration crisis? How has U.S. interventionism in Central America shaped past and present migration processes in this region? What are the effects of U.S. immigration policies on migrants’ clandestine journeys? How do we make sense of the contradiction between the recognition of the human rights of migrants and their lack of immigration status? How is the “illegality” of certain immigrant communities related to their race and ethnicity?

Speakers:

Moderated by Dr. Raúl Diego Rivera Hernández, Associate Professor, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and Director of the Latin American Studies Program, Villanova University

Co-sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program and the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Villanova University

Left to right: Dr. Leisy Abrego, Dr. Jason de León and Dr. Amelia Frank Vitale
Left to right: Dr. Leisy Abrego, Dr. Jason de León and Dr. Amelia Frank Vitale