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2020 Events at the Lepage Center


Tuesday, Jan. 28

"Revising the Holocaust

Deepening our understanding of Nazi-directed Genocide

Part 4 of a six-part series on "Revisionist History"

7:00pm-8:30pm, Driscoll Auditorium, Villanova University

When linked to the Holocaust, the term “historical revision” often implies a soft-pedaling of Nazi Germany’s mid-twentieth-century attempt to destroy Europe’s Jewish population. Distinct from these pernicious efforts, historical understandings of the Holocaust have nonetheless evolved, situating it with broader scholarship on genocide, the experiences of refugees and migrants, and evolving concepts of human rights. Join us for a panel conversation to discuss new directions in Holocaust scholarship and education.


Friday, Jan. 31

How Academics and Journalists Can Best Work Together: A Workshop with Charlotte Sutton

11:30am-1pm, Idea Accelerator, Villanova University

Join Charlotte Sutton, Assistant Managing Editor at The Philadelphia Inquirer, for a special workshop hosted by the Lepage Center on what comprises a successful relationship between editors, journalists and scholars. As a career-long reporter and editor, Mrs. Sutton has worked with hundreds of researchers and academics, as well as leading workshops for scholars on how to pitch their research to media members. 

Open to Villanova faculty, staff, and graduate students.

 

Friday, Feb. 7

History Career Day

11:00am-3pm, Room 205, Falvey Memorial Library, Villanova University

A signature program of the Lepage Center, "History Career Day" showcases for students how history majors put their degrees to work in the history profession and beyond, helping to shape our world and create enriching careers for themselves and others.

Open to all Villanova History graduate students, undergraduates majoring or minoring in History, and all students interested in a History degree. RSVP to lepage@villanova.edu.

 

CANCELED

"Revising Women's Suffrage

Marking an anniversary by expanding the conversation

Part 5 of a six-part series on "Revisionist History"

The 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage offers an opportunity to shine light on historical scholarship that challenges familiar myths and draws our attention to people and stories that these celebrations often overlook. Join us for a discussion that revises how we think about this anniversary and what histories it comprises.

 

CANCELED

"Revising the Planet

Adding a historical perspective to today’s climate conversations

Part 6 of a six-part series on "Revisionist History"

The 50th anniversary of Earth Day offers an opportunity to re-examine our changing conceptions of our planet and how new insights in environmental history can help us to assess our relationship to the world around us. Join us for a discussion broadens our notions of how the human relationship with the planet has changed over time.

 

Wednesday, Jun. 10

George Floyd and the Ensuing Protests

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

 

Wednesday, Jun. 24

What Can We Learn (If Anything) from a Plague in Athens 2,500 years ago?

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

With special guest Eliza Gettel

 

Wednesday, Jul. 8

Looking back at the 4th of July: The Challenges of Doing History in the Public Interest

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

with special guest Elizabeth Kolsky


Wednesday, Jul. 22

Museums, Looting, Repatriation

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

with special guest Tim McCall


Wednesday, Aug. 5

Asian Immigration

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

with special guest Andrew Liu

 

Wednesday, Aug. 12

Monuments & Memorials

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" conversation

with special guest Whitney Martinko

 

Wednesday, Sept. 9

A Conversation with Dr. Manjeet Ramgotra

Part I of a month-long series on "Decolonizing the Curriculum"

12:30pm-1:30pm via Zoom

Who is at the center of our curricula and who is at the margins? Join us for an open and honest conversation that examines how education and learning have historically played a role in prioritizing certain peoples and places over others. Dr. Ramgotra is a Lecturer in Political Theory at SOAS University of London and advocates for the inclusion of more women and people of color in university curricula.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Villanova University.

 

Wednesday, Sept. 16

"Decolonizing the Curriculum": A Roundtable Conversation

Part II of a month-long series on "Decolonizing the Curriculum"

6:00pm-7:30pm via Zoom

Who is at the center of our curricula and who is at the margins? Join us for a roundtable webinar conversation, part two in our month-long series, that examines how education and learning have historically played a role in prioritizing certain peoples and places over others across a wide range of time periods, topics, and geographic areas. 

Featuring: 

Moderated by Dr. Elizabeth Kolsky, Faculty Director of the Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Villanova University.

 

Wednesday, Sept. 23

A Conversation with Dr. Maghan Keita

Part III of a month-long series on "Decolonizing the Curriculum"

12:30pm-1:30pm via Zoom | Registration required

Who is at the center of our curricula and who is at the margins? Join us for a lunchtime conversation with Villanova's Maghan Keita to recap September's previous two events and engage in an open dialogue with students, faculty, staff and community members. Dr. Keita is Professor of History and Global Interdisciplinary Studies at Villanova University.

Co-sponsored by the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Villanova University.

 

Wednesday, Oct. 7

A Conversation with Professor Elizabeth Ellis

Part I of a month-long series on "Decolonizing Land"

12:30pm-1:30pm via Zoom | Registration require

How do Indigenous histories inform debates over sovereignty, land use, and repatriation today? Join us for a conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Ellis, a professor of early American and Native American history at New York University and a citizen of the Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma. Dr. Ellis has done American Indian advocacy work in Louisiana, North Carolina, and Pennsyldvania and was involved with the Standing Rock water protectors. We look forward to discussing her academic and activist work as it pertains to questions of Native land rights and the historical project of “decolonizing land.”

Moderated by Whitney Martinko, Associate Professor of History, Villanova University

 

Wednesday, Oct. 14

Mobilizing Indigenous Histories for Rights and Reparations: A Roundtable Discussion with Professors Doug Kiel, John Maynard, and Tembeka Ngcukaitobi

Part II of a month-long series on "Decolonizing Land"

6:00pm-7:30pm via Zoom

What role has law historically played in the dispossession of Native peoples? What role has law played in advancing Indigenous claims for land recovery, rights and reparations? Join us for a webinar, part two in our month-long series on “Decolonizing Land,” featuring a panel of global experts working at the intersection of law and history in Australia, South Africa, and the United States.

Featuring:

  • Dr. Doug Kiel, Assistant Professor of History at Northwestern University
  • Dr. John Maynard, Professor of Indigenous Education and Research and Chair of Indigenous History at The University of Newcastle
  • Mr. Tembeka Ngcukaitobi, Human Rights Lawyer, Legal Historian

Moderated by Elizabeth Kolsky, Lepage Center Faculty Director and Associate Professor of History, Villanova University

 

Wednesday, Oct. 21

A Conversation with Professor Whitney Martinko

Part III of a month-long series on "Decolonizing Land"

12:30pm-1:30pm via Zoom | Registration required

Join us for a lunchtime conversation with Dr. Whitney Martinko, Associate Professor of early U.S. history and public history at Villanova University. In our third and final event in the month-long series on "Decolonizing Land," Dr. Martinko will engage in open dialogue about how Indigenous histories inform debates over sovereignty, land use, and repatriation today.

Moderated by Elizabeth Kolsky, Lepage Center Faculty Director and Associate Professor of History, Villanova University