Skip to main content

Events at the Lepage Center

UPCOMING EVENTS | View past events >>

 

Virtual events

 

During the Covid-19 pandemic, The Lepage Center will host virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" as a forum for camaraderie, conversation, and examining world events through the prism of history.

On Wednesdays, we invite students, faculty, and staff as well as members of the broader community to join us for our summertime “Lunch @ Lepage” from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. via Zoom.

 

UPCOMING

August 12: Monuments & Memorials (Registration is required)

with special guest Whitney Martinko

This summer, protestors against white supremacy have sought to remove many monuments across the United States and beyond. Many of these protests re-energized or popularized calls to remove monuments to Confederate leaders. In Richmond, Virginia, for instance, protestors remade and toppled monuments across the city, Mayor Stoney removed Confederate statues along Monument Avenue, and historians explored how racist real estate developers erected these monuments as a lynchpin in their business plan. Yet this attention to monuments has moved beyond Confederate subjects to include colonizers, city mayors, eugenicists, and racist imagery. Join Dr. Whitney Martinko to learn about how historians are engaging in these conversations about monuments and their place in local communities.

Recent reporting:

  • Theresa Machemer on U.S. Christopher Columbus statues in Smithsonian Magazine
  • Vanessa Fonseca-Chávez on Juan de Oñate statues in New Mexico on KJJZ
  • Nick Fiorellini on Hannah Duston monument in New Hampshire in The Guardian
  • Nora McGreevy on Theodore Roosevelt equestrian statue at the AMNH in Smithsonian Magazine

 

Activity:

 

Recommended Reading on Monument History:

  • Wendy Bellion's Iconoclasm in New York about the destruction of the King George III statue during the U.S. War for Independence
  • Lisa Blee and Jean M. O'Brien's Monumental Mobility about the history of Massasoit statue first erected near Plymouth Rock
  • Dell Upton's What Can and Can't Be Said about the creation of civil rights monuments in the U.S. South

 

PREVIOUS

August 5: Asian Immigration

with special guest Andrew Liu

This event already occurred. Below were the articles that guided the conversation:

 

July 22: Museums, Looting, Repatriation

with special guest Tim McCall

This event already occurred. Below were the articles that guided the conversation:

 

July 8: Looking back at the 4th of July: On the Challenges of Doing History in the Public Interest

with special guest Elizabeth Kolsky

This event already occurred. Below were the articles that guided the conversation:

 

June 24: What Can We Learn (If Anything) from a Plague in Athens 2,500 years ago?

with special guest Eliza Gettel

This event already occurred. Below were the articles that guided the conversation:

 

June 10: George Floyd and the Ensuing Protests

This event already occurred. Below were some of the articles and Tweets that guided the conversation:

 

Virtual "Lunch @ Lepage" occurs from 12:30 - 1:30pm via Zoom.

Registration is required. Email lepage@villanova.edu for the URL.

 

In-person events

 

All events will be held virtually through fall 2020.

Please check the Villanova website for COVID-19 updates.

General info:

Lepage Center for History in the Public Interest
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
Villanova, PA 19085
Tel: (610) 519-4660

Web: lepage@villanova.edu
Twitter: @LepageCtr

In person:

The Lepage Center is located on the campus of Villanova University, inside the St. Augustine Center, Room 410.

Campus map >>

Media inquiries:

Please contact the Villanova University media relations department.