Employment Data

Employment Status of the Class of 2013 as of February 15, 2014, as reported to the ABA on March 17, 2014

VLS Employment Data - Class of 2013 (Page 1)
VLS Employment Data - Class of 2013 (Page 2)

Methodology

Placement data for the Class of 2013, which as defined by the American Bar Association includes all JD graduates from September 1, 2012 through August 31, 2013, was obtained by the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement using formal tools (including the NALP Graduate Employment Report and Salary Survey) and informal tools (including contact with graduates by members of the staff of the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement and other independent research).   Placement data reflects the status of each graduate as of February 15, 2014 as reported to the American Bar Association and has been reviewed by an independent auditor.

Employment Status of the Class of 2012 as of February 15, 2013, as reported to the ABA on March 15, 2013

ABA Employment Data for 2012 Villanova Law Graduates
ABA Employment Data for 2012 Villanova Law Graduates

Methodology

Placement data for the Class of 2012, which as defined by the American Bar Association includes all JD graduates from September 1, 2011 through August 31, 2012, was obtained by the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement using formal tools (including the NALP Graduate Employment Report and Salary Survey) and informal tools (including contact with graduates by members of the staff of the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement and other independent research).   Placement data reflects the status of each graduate as of February 15, 2013 as reported to the American Bar Association and has been reviewed by an independent auditor.

Employment Status of the Class of 2011 as of February 15, 2012 as reported to the ABA on March 15, 2012.

ABA Employment Data for 2011 Villanova Law Graduates

Methodology

Placement data for the Class of 2011, which as defined by the American Bar Association includes all JD graduates from September 1, 2010 through August 31, 2011, was obtained by the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement using formal tools (including the NALP Graduate Employment Report and Salary Survey) and informal tools (including contact with graduates by members of the staff of the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement and other independent research).   Placement data reflects the status of each graduate as of February 15, 2012 as reported to the American Bar Association and has been reviewed by an independent auditor.

As defined by the American Bar Association:

  • A “long-term” position is one that does not have a definite or indefinite term of less than one year.  It may have a definite length of time as long as the time is one year or longer.  It may also have an indefinite length so long as it is expected to last one year or more.
     
  • A “short-term” position is one that has a definite term of less than one year.  Thus, a clerkship that has a definite term of one year or more is not a short-term position. 
     
  • A “full-time” position is one in which the graduate works a minimum of 35 hours per week.
     
  • A “part-time” position is one in which the graduate works less than 35 hours per week.
     
  • “Employed – Bar Passage Required” – A position in this category requires the graduate to pass a bar exam and be licensed to practice law in one or more jurisdictions.
     
  • “Employed – JD Advantage” – A position in this category is one for which the employer sought an individual with a JD, and perhaps even required a JD, or for which the JD provided a demonstrable advantage in obtaining or performing the job, but itself does not require bar passage, an active law license, or involve practicing law.
     
  • “Employed – Professional Position” – A position in this category is one that requires professional skills or training but for which a JD is neither required nor a demonstrable advantage.
     
  • “Employed – Non-Professional Position” – A position in this category is one that does not require any special professional skills or training.
     
  • “Pursuing Graduate Degree Full-Time” – The graduate is pursuing further graduate education as of February 15, 2012.
     
  • “Unemployed – Start Date Deferred” – The graduate has accepted a written offer of employment by February 15, 2012, but the start date of the employment is subsequent to February 15, 2012.
     
  • “Unemployed – Seeking” - As of February 15, 2012, the graduate is “seeking” employment but is not employed.
     
  • “Employment Status Unknown” – The law school does not have information from or about the graduate upon which it can determine the graduate’s employment status.

Employment Status of the Class of 2010 as of February 15, 2011

VLS Employment Data - Class of 2010

Methodology

Placement data for the Class of 2010, which as defined by the American Bar Association includes all JD graduates from September 1, 2009 through August 31, 2010, was obtained by the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement using formal tools (including the NALP Graduate Employment Report and Salary Survey) and informal tools (including contact with graduates by members of the staff of the Office of Career Strategy and Advancement and other independent research). Placement data reflects the status of each graduate as of February 15, 2011 as reported to the American Bar Association and has been reviewed by an independent auditor.

* As defined by the American Bar Association, a “long-term” position is one that does not have a definite term of less than one year. It may have a definite length of time as long as the time is one year or longer. It may also have an indefinite length but is expected to last more than one year. Just because a short-term position may evolve into a long-term position does not make the position a long-term position

** As defined by the American Bar Association, a “short-term” position is one that has a definite term of less than one year. Thus, a clerkship that has a definite term of one year or more is not a short-term position. In addition, a position that is envisioned by the graduate and the employer to extend for one year or more is not a short-term position even though it is conditioned on bar licensure. Thus, a long-term position that is conditioned on passing the bar exam by a certain date does not become a short-term position because of the condition.

We note that 9 employed members of the Class of 2010 have not disclosed whether their employment is long-term or short-term. Accordingly, the term of employment for those 9 members of the Class of 2010 is unknown.

*** As defined by the American Bar Association, “employed” means that the graduate was employed as of February 15, 2011. The employment may be in a position that requires bar passage, in a position for which a JD is preferred, in a position in another profession, or in a non-professional position.