Humanities Faculty Mentors

Eugene McCarraher, Ph.D.

Rutgers University, 1995
Assistant Professor of Humanities
Office: SAC 475; Phone: 610-519-4796
E-mail: eugene.mccarraher@villanova.edu

My research interests include culture, religion, intellectual life, and economics in 20th-century America. My teaching interests include the relationship of economics, culture, and religion; the intersection of politics and literature; the history of radical or utopian movements; and the cultural and intellectual history of modern America. I am currently working on a cultural history of corporate capitalism in the United States, tentatively entitled The Enchantments of Mammon: Corporate Capitalism and the American Moral Imagination.

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Anna Bonta Moreland, Ph.D.

Boston College, 2006
Assistant Professor, Department of Humanities
Office: SAC 478; Phone: 610-519-6943
E-mail: anna.moreland@villanova.edu

Dr. Moreland is systematic theologian by training.  She has written on Thomas Aquinas and is now writing in the area of the theology of religious pluralism.  Her publications include KNOWN BY NATURE: THOMAS AQUINAS ON NATURAL KNOWLEDGE OF GOD (Herder & Herder, 2010), and NEW VOICES IN CATHOLIC THEOLOGY, Anna Moreland and Joseph Curran, eds. (Herder & Herder, forthcoming).  She teaches courses in the Augustine and Culture Seminar, the rise of modern atheism, interreligious dialogue, and the theology of Thomas Aquinas. 

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D. C. Schindler, Ph.D.

The Catholic University of America, 2001
Assistant Professor of Humanities
Office: SAC 173; Phone: 610-519-4719
E-mail: david.schindler@villanova.edu

Dr. Schindler has a broad interest in the history of philosophy, particularly in ancient Greek, classical German, and twentieth-century Catholic philosophy. His research interests include the nature of reason and the will, and he is currently working on the concept of freedom in German philosophy as an alternative to conventional notions in the Anglo-American tradition. His teaching has recently focused on the philosophy of beauty and love, and he is happy to work with students who wish to explore questions in philosophical anthropology, metaphysics, or the philosophy of religion.

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Jeanne Schindler, Ph.D.

University of Notre Dame, 2000
Assistant Professor of Humanities
Office: SAC 477; Phone: 610-519-4687
E-mail: Jeanne.Schindler@villanova.edu

Dr. Schindler's professional and research interests include Christian political thought, democratic theory, virtue ethics, and faith and learning.

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Thomas W. Smith, Ph.D.

University of Notre Dame, 1993
Director, University Honors Program
Associate Professor, Political Science
Office: Garey 113; Phone: 610-519-7300
E-mail: thomas.w.smith@villanova.edu

Dr. Smith’s teaching interests center on the history of political thought in the west (with a special emphasis on classical, medieval, and early modern political philosophy) and religion and politics. His current research takes issue with libertarian and post-modern accounts of human life that argue that reason is not capable of ordering complex human actions in a way that works towards the common good. Smith seeks a more expansive conception of political life that defends the dignity of politics, and acknowledges its two-fold task: ordering complex systems of human action through practical wisdom, and moderating the tendency of those attracted to public life to work for their own honor rather than the common good.

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Helena M. Tomko, Ph.D.

Oxford University, 2002
Assistant Professor of Literature
Office: SAC 474; Phone: 610-519-3017
E-mail: helena.tomko@villanova.edu

Dr. Helena Tomko studies early twentieth-century German literature, in particular Catholic writing.  Her book Sacramental Realism: Gertrud von le Fort and German Catholic Literature in the Weimar Republic and Third Reich was published in 2007.  Her current academic work concerns the literary "inner emigration" during the Third Reich and the influence of interwar Catholic thought on the post-1945 generation of German novelists.  She is interested more broadly in the intersection of religion and literature, in particular the comparative development of the modern Catholic novel.   She teaches courses in the Department of Humanities on the Catholic novel; the modern myths of Faust and Frankenstein; and the question of how reality is represented in fiction.  She also teaches both ancient and modern ACS seminars.

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James Matthew Wilson, M.F.A., Ph.D.

University of Notre Dame, M.F.A., 2005/Ph.D., 2006
Assistant Professor of Literature
Office: SAC 304; Phone: 610-519-4634
E-mail: James.M.Wilson@villanova.edu
Website: http://www.villanova.edu/artsci/humanities/

James Matthew Wilson studies the relation of philosophical-theology, Catholicism, and the arts, with particular interests in St. Thomas Aquinas, the nature of Beauty, and modern poetry.  Among his published works are essays on the modern poet-critic T.S. Eliot and the French neo-Thomist Jacques Maritain (on whom he is also completing a book); on modern and contemporary poets such as Yvor Winters, John Crowe Ransom, Anthony Hecht, Helen Pinkerton, and Timothy Steele; on the relation of story-telling and truth in Plato and the western tradition; and on modern Irish poetry, classical philosophy, and Irish Catholicism.  He also publishes, in a wide variety of journals and magazines, on modern culture, politics, ethics, education and economics.  He is also a poet and critic of contemporary poetry, with a particular interest in prosody (rhyme and meter); and is the author of a book of poems, Four Verse Letters (2010).

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