Intro Level Core Courses

HIS 1150-H01 Europe and the 18th Century World

Craig Bailey
TR 1:00-2:15

The core theme of this course is that in order to understand eighteenth-century Europe, we have to examine it in a broader, global context. Beginning with an examination of European politics, economy and society in the eighteenth century, and then turning to explore interactions between Europeans and the rest of the world (particularly Africa and the Middle East), we will critique Eurocentric assumptions that Europeans were the sole creators of the modern world. Considering the perspectives of European writers who never left home, the works of Western travelers who ventured beyond Europe, and the ways in which non-Europeans saw the West, we will discover that the eighteenth century witnessed new forms of exchange between different societies that created both benefits and uncertainties for the people who lived through that period in history. De-centering the eighteenth century from its European shackles will allow us to view a global world in the making, a process that we are still grappling with today.

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MAT 1505-004 Calculus II

Amanda Knecht
MWF 8:30-9:20 R 9:00-9:50

 
This course covers Integral Calculus and is designed for freshman who scored well on the AB Calculus exam and feel that they really understand the material from Calculus I.  The honors section will cover more theoretical aspects of Calculus than the other sections and is designed to be more hands on and student driven.   The topics covered include: Integration (indefinite, definite), applications of integration (area, volume, applications to physics and economics, etc.), methods of integration, approximate integration (trapezoidal and Simpson's rules), improper integrals, differential equations, infinite sequences and series. 

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SOC 1000-H01 Intro to Sociology

Rick Eckstein
MWF 8:30-9:20

This course will develop a sociological imagination for understanding human behavior.  This is related to but not synonymous with learning about the discipline of sociology (what professional sociologists do) or about the vocabulary of sociology (a secret language).  Instead, we will cultivate a structural, systematic, and, critical perspective for understanding how people both shape and are shaped by the larger world around them.

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PSC 1200-H01 International Relations

Lance Kenney
TR 10:00-11:15

This course is an introduction to the study of international relations (IR), a distinct academic discipline that involves elements of political science, history, economics, sociology, and philosophy. The aim is to present the key concepts, theories, and paradigms that shape and influence world politics. Simply reporting on contemporary international events is NOT the goal: evaluating and critically assessing those events IS the goal.

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THL 1000-H01 Intro to Theology

Gerald Beyer
TR 2:30-3:45

Karl Marx famously stated that religion is “the sigh of the oppressed creature” and “the opium of the people.”  Like many thinkers before and after him, Marx argued that Christian faith impedes human progress and the promotion of justice. On the other hand, Christianity increasingly emphasized the relationship between faith and justice throughout the 20thcentury.  Does Christianity hinder or foster justice and the common good?  Has Christianity helped or hindered the advancement of the rights of women?  Can Christian faith be reconciled with evolution, or does the acceptance of evolution make faith obsolete, as the New Atheists staunchly contend? In this course we will examine the responses of Christian theologians and their critics to such questions.  We will also consider the political, social, and economic implications of the classic theological doctrines, sources, and ritual practices of the Catholic tradition, along with obstacles to Christian discipleship such as consumerism, racism, and excessive individualism. 

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THL 1000-H02 Intro to Theology

Anna Moreland
TR 1:00-2:15

This course introduces students to the study of Christian theology.  It begins by investigating foundational questions about the rationality of Christian belief.   It then explores the coherence of Christianity by examining four cornerstones of this world view: God, Christ, sacraments, and the Christian life.  Students will read a contemporary introduction to each topic coupled with a primary text from the theological tradition.  This course will enable students to gain competence in Christian theological language.  It will also provide a basis for subsequent theological study.

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THL 1000-H03 Intro to Theology

Joanna Scholz
MWF 10:30-11:20

Life is a mystery. It is a challenge to understand ourselves, our beliefs, our relationships, and our world.  This course invites and challenges students to do theology, that is, to think critically and reflect on the ultimate mystery, the mystery of God who is revealed through the Word in Scripture, and through the Word-made-flesh in the person of Jesus Christ. Throughout our study of the Hebrew Scriptures and Christian Testament we will explore key themes such as God as Creator, and the human person as creature made in the image of the one good God who loves us. We will reflect on the topic of faith, the realities of grace and sin. We will focus on the theme of redemption through the saving power of Jesus, his cross and resurrection.  We will explore the concept of the Paschal Mystery which gives us meaning and hope for the future. We will discuss the theme of discipleship in each of the four gospels and reflect on the call of each person to follow Christ in a unique way. In addition to scripture study we will read primary texts by theologians of the early Church, with focus on the development of Christian Doctrine. We will also discuss the branches of theology, giving students the opportunity to consider areas of future study.  

Course requirements:  Active participation in all class sessions, which includes evidence of having completed the assigned readings, a series of short written assignments, three tests and a final examination

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THL 1000-H04 Intro to Theology

Jesse Couenhoven
MW 1:30-2:45

Our culture retains some of the vocabulary of the Christian faith (we've heard of Jesus, and Trinity), and thinks it knows what Christianity is all about. But most people mistakenly think Christianity is about ‘being good’ or something of the sort, which means that our culture has actually forgotten what it is all about, and why it matters. Christianity is not interested so much in your being good (and hardly at all in your being “nice” or “decent”) as in your being saved. But from what, and why? Those are the questions we pursue in this class. The answers are complex, but exploring them can help us to understand ourselves, and the world in which we live.

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PHI 1000-H01 Intro to Philosophy

John Doody
TR 11:30-12:45

Philosophical responses to the questions of how we can know, what is real, and what is the nature of human existence that explore the dialogue between Catholic, Christian, secular and skeptical perspectives on these questions.

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PHI 1000-H02 Intro to Philosophy

Michael Thompson
MWF 9:30-10:20

Our primary purpose, in this course of study, is to introduce the student to philosophy and its place in the history of ideas and the western arts and sciences. We will use a quasi-historical method of representing some of the essential philosophical texts in the western tradition. The selected readings will emphasize a division of philosophy called aesthetics, which refers to theories concerning the nature and purposes of art, beauty, and the beautiful. We will use aesthetics as a means to articulate and clarify the major ideas of philosophy. The essence of a philosophical account is reasoned arguments which are intended to persuade a reader as to the merits of claims concerning crucial aspects of some contested state of affairs. We will focus on philosophical arguments which respond to questions such as: What is the nature and purpose of art? Is art dangerous? What is the relationship between truth and art? What is beauty? Is there a relationship between beauty and art? Is there are relationship between beauty and truth? Is there a relationship between ugliness and beauty in art? What do these relationships entail? What is aesthetic taste? What does it mean to have good taste? What is the nature of goodness and is there a relationship between goodness and art? The analysis and evaluation of these issues and there like, will be useful in beginning to come to some understanding of what great philosophers are about when doing philosophy. We will focus on the texts of Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, St. Augustine, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Danto, Cavell, and Foucault among others. We will also use in-class music presentations for inner-disciplinary evaluations of the philosophy of music in order to illuminate aesthetic theories and ideas.

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PHI 1000-H03 Intro to Philosophy

Walter Brogan
MW 3:00-4:15

In this course, we will study some of the great authors of the history of philosophy in the West: Plato, Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, Marx, Arendt and Freud.  Among the philosophical questions we will address will be: what it means to be real; what are the foundations of just law and the basic principles of morality; how do we know we know; can we prove the existence of God and can we understand God’s being? What does it mean to be a person? Since it is a core course, we will focus on developing an understanding of the methods and aims of philosophical thinking. A basic question we will ask is, "What does it mean to be political and rational beings?  What is the ideal community for human beings? The class will encourage sharing ideas and insights and will strive to raise critical questions that allow each of us to seriously confront the texts and ideas we encounter.  Our goal will be to enhance our writing and conversation skills in an academic setting where we discuss together salient philosophical ideas.

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PHI 1000-H04 Intro to Philosophy

Annika Thiem
TR 1:00-2:15

Description forthcoming.

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HON 1000-001, 1001-001, 1003-001 Interdisciplinary Humanities I

Immerwahr, Rose, Danove
MWF 9:30-11:20, 12:30-1:20

HON 1000 Philosophy-Immerwahr
In this course students will explore some of the most interesting and important works of ancient western philosophy starting with Socrates and Plato, and moving to Aristotle, Hellenistic philosophy, and the incorporation of the some of the ideas of ancient philosophy into the Christian perspective of St. Augustine and Boethius.  Some of the themes explored include: the nature of reality and the human mind; how we know; the nature of God; human happiness; and the origin of evil. We will also do a brief examination of how similar themes are approached in Eastern Philosophy, especially Buddhism.

HON 1001 Literature-Rose
The literature strand of Interdisc I focuses on the relations between text and performance, literature and speech, literacy and orality, culture and myth, the stories we tell and why/how we tell them. We explore the place of performance in ancient Greece from the time of Homer through the height of theatre in 5th century BCE Athens. The texts are experienced from page to stage to uncover what makes them inherently theatrical and how they spoke to their particular audiences.

HON 1003 Theology-Danove
The Theology/Religious Studies component of this course introduces the exegetical methods used to study the Gospels of Mark, Luke, and John, four Pauline Epistles (Philemon, 1 Thessalonians, Philippians, and Galatians), and the Letter of James and employs these methods to investigate the theological concerns of their authors.

Course Objectives:
1. To introduce the methods of source, textual, literary, redaction, and narrative analysis
2. To apply the methods of literary, redaction, and narrative analysis
3. To provide an exegetical survey of Mark, Luke, John, Philemon, 1 Thessalonians, Philippians, Galatians, and James
4. To develop an appreciation of the theological themes emphasized by the New Testament authors

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ACS 1000-H01 Freshman Seminar HUM

Thomas Smith
MWF 11:30-12:20

(Restricted to students in the Global Scholars: Independent Humanities Learning Cohort)

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the transcendental “good.”  From the perspective of the students, the question of the good originates in the question of “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course is a course in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  “The Good” course is first in the learning cohort sequence, since it addresses foundational questions.  Readings include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Shakespeare, Scripture, Machiavelli, Tocqueville, etc.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

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ACS 1000-H02 Freshman Seminar PPE

Mary Hirschfeld
MWF 11:30-12:20

(Restricted to students in the Global Scholars: Politics, Philosophy, and Economics Learning Cohort)

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the transcendental “good.”  From the perspective of the students, the question of the good originates in the question of “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course is a course in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  “The Good” course is first in the learning cohort sequence, since it addresses foundational questions.  Readings include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Shakespeare, Scripture, Machiavelli, Tocqueville, etc.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

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ACS 1000-H03 Freshman Seminar GTB

Mark Shiffman
MWF 11:30-12:20

(Restricted to students in the Good, True, Beautiful Learning Cohort)

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the transcendental “good.”  From the perspective of the students, the question of the good originates in the question of “How should I live?” and “How should my society be ordered?”  Thus “The Good” course is a course in Political Philosophy and Ethics.  “The Good” course is first in the learning cohort sequence, since it addresses foundational questions.  Readings include selections from Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics, Shakespeare, Scripture, Machiavelli, Tocqueville, etc.  Co-curricular activities such as trips and combined learning cohort lectures are also a part of this course.

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ACS 1000-H04 Freshman Seminar

Catherine Staples
TR 8:30-945

Close reading and discussion of selected texts from the time of Homer and the Greek lyric poets through the English Renaissance. Writing will be intensive, with emphasis placed upon revision, as distinct from editing, as well as the mastery of various writing techniques—from journals to mark-ups to free-writes. As many of the works we study have oral origins, we’ll begin with a close look at a tale that’s come down to us through purely oral channels, weighing memory, imagination, and cultural intention. Our readings will be close and full good inquiries whether we are discussing the roil of fate and free will in Achilles; the elliptical narrative of the J writer;  the varied styles and spiritual journeys of Augustine, Pizan, and Dante; or patterns of wit and silence in Shakespeare. The class will include a trip to Philadelphia Museum of Art to see Twombly’s Fifty Days at Ilium as well as a movie or performance night, featuring Shakespeare’s As You Like It.

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ACS 1000-H05 Freshman Seminar

Timothy Horner
TR 10:00-11:15

Core humanities seminar based principally on texts and readings drawn from primary sources up to 1650. Extensive written work and seminar discussions. Required readings: Hebrew and Christian scriptures, selections from the works of Augustine, Greek and Renaissance works. Readings from different genres and disciplines. Themes developed by the instructor in accordance with the selected readings.

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ACS 1000-H06 Freshman Seminar

Scott Moringiello
TR 11:30-12:45

Description forthcoming.

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Hear from our Students

Hear from our Students

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