Storm Events

During the Storm Events

One of the research goals for the Infiltration Trench was to see how site performance changed over time.  Using the instrumentation installed at the Infiltration Trench, performance of the site was monitored during rain events.  The following example shows how the performance of the Infiltration Trench changed over the course of a year by comparing two storms, one year apart.

Figure 1: This figure depicts the very first storm event recorded on July 7, 2004. The plot shows precipitation data (blue blocks on secondary y-axis) and the depth of water within the infiltration trench (dark blue line primary y-axis)
Figure 1: This figure depicts the very first storm event recorded on July 7, 2004. The plot shows precipitation data (blue blocks on secondary y-axis) and the depth of water within the infiltration trench (dark blue line primary y-axis)
Figure 2: The data plot for the July 7, 2005 storm event. This graph depicts the depth of water within the trench along with the rainfall depth over time. This is a typical way to evaluate the storm characteristics and the performance of the infiltration trench. Notice how the infiltration rate decreases as the water level within the trench decreases.
Figure 2: The data plot for the July 7, 2005 storm event. This graph depicts the depth of water within the trench along with the rainfall depth over time. This is a typical way to evaluate the storm characteristics and the performance of the infiltration trench. Notice how the infiltration rate decreases as the water level within the trench decreases.
Picture 3: Another view of the flow through the inlet box and the V-notch weir for the July 7 2005 storm event.
Picture 3: Another view of the flow through the inlet box and the V-notch weir for the July 7 2005 storm event.
Picture 1: Picture of the July 7 2004 storm event showing the inflow box open, and water seeping upward through the EP Henry Eco-Pavers.
Picture 1: Picture of the July 7 2004 storm event showing the inflow box open, and water seeping upward through the EP Henry Eco-Pavers.
Picture 2: Flow during the July 7 2005 storm event and the flow over the V-notch weir located at the entrance of the trench. Notice that the inlet pipe has been shortened and additional baffles have been added as compared to the picture above. The shorter pipe and additional baffles provided a more stable flow entering the trench. It also should be noted that no water was seeping upward from the EP Henry Eco-Pavers during this event.
Picture 2: Flow during the July 7 2005 storm event and the flow over the V-notch weir located at the entrance of the trench. Notice that the inlet pipe has been shortened and additional baffles have been added as compared to the picture above. The shorter pipe and additional baffles provided a more stable flow entering the trench. It also should be noted that no water was seeping upward from the EP Henry Eco-Pavers during this event.

When comparing the storms a year later, major differences in trench performance can be seen.  Most notably, the overall performance and infiltration rates within the trench changed drastically over the course of one year (2004-2005). In Figure 1 (2004), all of the water within the infiltration trench percolates into the ground within 4 hours for the 0.43 inch rainfall event.  In comparison, Figure 2 shows that for the 2005 storm event, it takes approximately 50 hours for the 2.2 inch rainfall event to percolate into the ground.