Past Events

SPRING 2013

Dr. Kenji Yoshino

Kenji Yoshino, J.D.

Professor Kenji Yoshino is an acclaimed NYU law professor whose topic of discussion pertains to his book, Covering. To 'Cover" is to downplay a disfavored trait so as to blend into the mainstream. Because all of us possess stigmatized attributes, we all encounter pressure to conform, or "cover", in our daily lives. (March 21)

FALL 2012

Dr. Maura Cullen

Maura Cullen, Ph.D.

With over 25 years of experience as a trainer and keynote speaker, Dr. Maura Cullen has been referred to as being the best there is at simplifying the complex issues of diversity in an entertaining and educatiional manner. Dr. Cullen has her doctorate in Soicl Justice and Diversity Education, is a founding faculty member of the Social Justice Training Institute and is the author of 25 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say. (October 23)

SPRING 2012

Dr. Michael Fowlin

Michael Fowlin, Ph.D.

Dr. Michael Fowlin has assembled exciting programs on the issues of race, discrimination violence prevention and personal identity. His original and powerful presentations bring a heightened awareness of these issues. They also suggest SOLUTIONS. (March 20, 2012).

FALL 2011

Dr. Peggy McIntosh

Peggy McIntosh,  Ph.D.

Dr. Peggy McIntosh is an anti-racist activist and feminist scholar who is well known for her concept of the invisible knapsak of privilege. (Nov. 9, 2011)

SPRING 2011

Frances Kendall

Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D., is a nationally known consultant who has focused for more than thirty-five years on organizational change, diversity, and white privilege, delivering keynote addresses on facilitating and creating intentional organizational change, addressing issues of diversity in organizations, and aiding white people in understanding the impact of their skin color in systemically providing opportunities and privileges not granted to others

FALL 2010

Allan Johnson

Allan G. Johnson, Ph.D.

Allan G. Johnson is a novelist, nonfiction writer, sociologist, teacher, and public speaker who has spent much of his life trying to understand the human condition, especially as shaped by issues of gender, race, and social class. Allan’s approach to social justice is based on the idea that unraveling the knot of privilege begins with getting clear about what privilege really is, about what it’s got to do with each of us, and about how everyone can see themselves as part of the process of change toward something better.

SPRING 2010

Tim Wise

Tim Wise

Tim Wise is among the most prominent anti-racist writers and activists in the U.S., and has been called the foremost white anti-racist intellectual. Philosopher Cornel West calls Tim, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (antiracism and antislavery fighter) John Brown,” is among the most prominent anti-racist writers and educators in the United States. Wise, who was named one of “25 Visionaries Who are Changing Your World,” by Utne Reader in 2010, has spoken in all 50 states of the U.S., on over 800 college and high school campuses, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda on issues of comparative racism, race and education, racism and religion, and racism in the labor market.

FALL 2009

Lee Mun Wah

Lee Mun Wah

Lee Mun Wah is an internationally renowned Chinese American documentary filmmaker, author, poet, Asian folkteller, educator, community therapist and master diversity trainer. It is Lee Mun Wah’s belief that we cannot wait until tomorrow for some charismatic leader to appear who will bring us all together. We each must take a stand and personally participate in this important journey of confronting our fears and beginning a conversation not only with those we love but also with those we have been taught to fear. We cannot continue being separate and unequal without there being a cost to each and every generation. Our survival and the very future of our children depend on all of us embracing our differences as well as our mutuality. If we can accomplish this in our lifetime, we can then look back and know that we have found a way to live together authentically and harmoniously, using and honoring all of our gifts and special contributions. To Lee Mun Wah, that is the true meaning of multiculturalism.