Greetings from the Chair

aa

Hello and welcome to the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, an exciting and vibrant community of teacher/scholars and students dedicated to the study of French and Francophone Studies, Hispanic Studies, Italian Studies and Portuguese Studies; languages, literatures and cultures that constitute the very fibers of our Western world and civilization at both sides of the Atlantic. Please come in and find out what our Department has to offer.

Mercedes Juliá, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairperson

_______________________________________________________________

Please meet our new faculty starting Fall 2013

aa

Professor Luca Cottini received a Ph.D in Romance Languages and Literatures at Harvard University (2012) and a Master’s in Italian Studies at the University of Notre Dame (2007). Trained in Italy as a classical philologist, and in the United States as a cultural historian, his interests touch upon Italian literature, visual arts, and intellectual history from the 17th to the 20th centuries.  He is currently working on a book project, in which he explores the cultural reception of industrial objects and industrialism in Italy at the turn of the 20th century.

aa

Professor Étienne Achille received his doctorate in French and Francophone Literatures from the University of Cincinnati. His research focuses on Francophone Caribbean and Maghrebi literatures and cultures as well as contemporary French civilization from a postcolonial perspective. Étienne’s articles are forthcoming in French Forum, Contemporary French Civilization and Nouvelles Études Francophones. His current monograph, based on his dissertation, studies literary representations of the Francophone Caribbean diaspora’s participation to the performative writing of the French nation, and reflects upon a potential evolution of the concept of nation.

aa

Professor Jill Gonzalez holds a Master’s degree in Hispanic Studies from Villanova University (2006) and a PhD in Hispanic Language and Literatures from Boston University (2013).  She received the “Excellence in Teaching Award” from the Boston University Romance Studies Department in 2009 and 2010.  Jill’s research focuses on the literature, film and art produced during the Chilean dictatorship and transition to democracy.  She is currently writing an article which explores the relationship between urban space and historical memory in twentieth-century Latin American literature.                  

aa

Professor Cristina Percoco holds a BA in Spanish from Colgate University and an MA and Ph.D in Spanish from the University of Virginia. She has extensive teaching experience in beginning to advanced-level language, conversation, writing and Hispanic civilization and culture courses. Before coming to Villanova, she has taught at Oxford College of Emory University and at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also co-directed and coordinated summer-study abroad programs in Salamanca, Seville and Alicante, Spain respectively. Her research interests include later nineteenth and twentieth-century Peninsular narrative, Latin American short fiction, visual arts, and the use of technology in the humanities. The daughter of Italian immigrants, she is also fluent in Italian and Sicilian, thanks in large part to her grandmother and close relatives in Rome.

Faculty Highlights: