Spring 2013 (Graduate)

Below is a listing of the Graduate classes being offered for Fall 2012. For information on specific times, days and instructors, please check  the Master Class Schedule on NOVASIS.

PSC 8000 - 003 TOP: Global Feminism CRN: 33589

Days: R from 7:30 pm to 9:30 pm Location: TBA
Instructor: Sally J. Scholz

This course offers an in depth look into four theoretical approaches to feminism's global reach: global feminism, post-colonial feminism, 'Third World' feminism, and transnational feminism. Our focus will be on the bases for human rights and solidarity as we look at some of the challenges facing feminist activists in an era of globalization. Such issues as violence against women, commodification of the body and human trafficking, care chains, and masculinization of agriculture will enliven our discussions.

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8250 - 001 Merleau-Ponty CRN: 31916

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Thomas Busch

Reading and discussion of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophical project from its appropriation of Husserl’s phenomenology, principally in Phenomenology of Perception, to the posthumously published ontological reflections of The Visible and the Invisible. Several essays in Signs will be examined as marking the transition from the former to the latter.
Books:
Phenomenology of Perception (Humanities Press)
Signs (Northwestern University Press)
The Visible and the Invisible (Northwestern University Press)
Requirements: research paper; final examination; class presentation

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 8710 - 001 SEM: Spinoza's Politics CRN: 31917

Days: R from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Julie Klein

An intensive study of the Theologico-Political Treatise (1670) and the unfinished Political Treatise in historical context and contemporary perspectives.  We will at times examine parallel texts in the Ethics, but familiarity with the Ethics is not assumed.

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8710 - 002 SEM: Environmental Philosophy CRN: 31918

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Chaone Mallory

It is becoming increasingly recognized that addressing environmental problems in our age of growing environmental crises requires more than scientific knowledges; other modes of inquiry, such as those developed through philosophical training, are needed as well. Classes in Environmental Ethics are widely taught in philosophy departments at colleges and universities across the country, and are often required for a variety of fields of study such as environmental studies, engineering, political science, and law. Such courses tend to be large survey courses, introducing both the subject and modes of philosophical inquiry (such as ethical reasoning) to those in majors other than philosophy. They introduce students to questions concerning the human/nature relationship, asking questions such as: How ought we behave toward, and interact with, other animals and ecosystems? What should we do about climate change and why? Does nature have intrinsic worth, or is it primarily for the use of humans? How can classical ethical theories such as utilitarianism, deontology, and natural law ethics be applied to environmental debates? Must we address gender and social inequities in order to address environmental issues? What sorts of policies best express environmental values? Such courses also usually survey major sub-fields of environmental philosophy, such as deep ecology, social ecology, ecofeminism, bioregionalism, and environmental justice.

An advanced course in Environmental Philosophy differs from that sort of course in significant ways, while still engaging the major questions and areas listed above. In this advanced research seminar we will approach the subject in terms of what has been called “the philosophical turn” in environmental philosophy. While certainly not leaving aside ethical questions, in the past 10 years or so the philosophical turn in environmental philosophy has emphasized other sorts of philosophical questions; for example: What is the subject of environmental philosophy? What are we talking about when we are talking about nature, or wildness, or the human and the “non”? How does understanding what it means to be human entail understanding human situatedness within a more-than-human world? What is the ethical, epistemological, phenomenological, metaphysical, and/or ontological status of that which we call nature? What are our embodied relations with nature, what are our modes of encounter with the more-than-human world? How important is thoughtful reflection to environmental practice and activism? What are the ethico-political implications of our answers to these questions? How is our global environmental situation forcing philosophy to “bake bread” (lest we literally bake the planet!)?

This course will not presume any previous formal exposure to environmental ethics philosophy , only the ability reflect thoughtfully and to apply philosophical analysis to contemporary exigencies. But the fact of the graduate level of this course will enable us take the material offered in a traditional Environmental Ethics class further, and to explore debates, positions, and figures more in-depth with greater sustained philosophical attention and sophistication. In addition to topics and methodologies covered, we will place specific emphasis on how environmental philosophy fits into and is in dialogue with other traditions in philosophy, and philosophy as a whole. It also, importantly, will help to prepare students to develop teaching competency (and thus increase students’ eventual employment opportunities) in Environmental Ethics/Philosophy, an increasingly in-demand area in philosophy departments at colleges and universities across the country.

Requirements: Active, engaged participation; one revised seminar paper. One or two “field trips” relevant to the topic are almost certain, as Environmental Philosophy necessarily incorporates both theory and praxis (and in fact challenges that split…).

Readings: The course readings are likely to include the following texts and authors:

Edmund Husserl
Maurice-Merleau Ponty
Edward Casey
Patricia Glazebrook
Kelly Oliver
Bruno Latour
David Abram The Spell of the Sensuous
Ted Toadvine, ed. Ecophenomenology: Getting Back to the Earth Itself
Val Plumwood Feminism and the Mastery of Nature (1993); Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason (2002)
Aldo Leopold (and commentators; incl. J. Baird Callicott)
Donna Haraway
Cary Wolfe, ed. Zoontologies: The Question of the Human; What Is Post Humanism
Jacques Derrida, The Animal Therefore I Am; Eating Well
Martin Heidegger
NPR Story “From Grunting to Gabbing: Why Humans Can Talk http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129083762
Kate Soper What Is Nature?
Geoff Fraz “The Howl of the Predator”

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 8710 - 004 SEM: Inquiry & Presumptions CRN: 31920

Days: R from 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm Location: TBA
Instructors: Stephen Napier

Contemporary epistemology has largely been dominated by the project of defining “knowledge” in a way that is immune to counterexample. There are, however, two other more interesting projects that are developing: what counts as a good inquirer, and what beliefs should I accept (or “presume”) without further support. The latter project may also be called epistemic casuistry which asks “under what conditions may I just accept a proposition without support?” The former project focuses not on what beliefs I may presume, but on what kind of inquirer I should become. Both projects, of course, are related in that they both revolve around the larger question of how one should conduct his/her cognitive life (one focuses on specific beliefs, the other on one’s intellectual character). The defining-knowledge project ignores wholesale this more fundamental and important question. We will focus then, on the latter two projects.

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 33714

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 33715

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney 
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation CRN: 33716

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney 
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 33717

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney 
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020