Fall 2013 (Graduate)

Below is a listing of the Graduate classes being offered for Fall 2013. For information on specific times, days and instructors, please check  the Master Class Schedule on NOVASIS.


PHI 8070 - 001 Nietzsche: CRN: 22610

Days: W from 6:00 pm to 8:30 pm
Instructors: John Carvalho
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

This course aims to comment on a number of subjects in Nietzsche’s philosophy by grouping them under a few common themes – genealogy, life, existence, politics, woman, Dionysus and art, especially the art of music. Success at interpreting the pathos of distance, nihilism, the death of God, will to power, eternal recurrence, self-overcoming, revaluation of values, the herd, bad conscience, masks, style, the body, music, and the problem of Socrates will be measured against an understanding of what motivated Nietzsche, beginning in 1886, to revise his earlier work and fashion the views that dominate his last writings: Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, The Case of Wagner, Twilight of the Idols, The Antichrist, and Ecce Homo.  Study of these texts will be supplemented by attention to the notes collected as The Will to Power and to several contemporary commentaries. 

PHI 8120 - 001 Wittgenstein CRN: 22611

Days: R from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: James R. Wetzel

Must be enrolled in one of the folllowing level:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Ludwig Wittgenstein is a big presence in the history of 20th century philosophy. The primary business of this seminar is to conduct a close reading of his two major works: Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus and Philosophical Investigations. Our broad focus will be on Wittgenstein’s abiding fascination with language, his eventual disillusionment with the notion of logical form, and his apparent trade of logical form for the enigmatic concept of "forms of life." We will also give select attention to two influential portraits of Wittgenstein in the secondary literature: Kripke’s inventively skeptical skeptic and Badiou’s anti-philosophical philosopher.

 

PHI 8710 - 001 Evil in German Philosophy CRN: 22612

Days: MW from 3:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Instructors: William Desmond
Comment: Course dates: 8/26 - 10/11
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

The problem of evil is a perennial one, but it is remarkable how evil arises as an issue in German philosophy at the height of its rationalist and idealist development. We associate Kant with a philosophy of rational autonomy wherein human self-determination is defended against all heteronomy, and yet at the end of his reflection radical evil arises as an ineradicable disposition of the human being. Evil as resistant to self-determination enters the heart of our project to be as fully self-determining as possible. Evil also cannot be avoided in the idealistic project of the rational self-determination of thinking. So we find in Hegel: he claims to make evil intelligible within the logic of his rational concept. However, even granting the relation of evil and self-determination, there seems something about evil that also is recalcitrant to our self-determination. In post-idealistic thought we find an intimation or foreboding of an kind of negative otherness recalcitrant to rational self-determination, and this enters into the heart of our sense, not just of the human being, but of the absolute itself.  This we find with Schelling and others.  How are we to think of evil? As intimately related to freedom? As only related to human freedom? As having implication for an ontological/ meontological sense of the evil of being? As immanent in God?  The foreboding of an immanent evil subsequently sets a kind of metaphysical tone for some important intellectual and cultural currents in Continental thought. We will look at such questions concerning evil in Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Reason Alone, Hegel’s Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion and Schelling’s Essay on Freedom.

 

Texts:

I. Kant, Religion and Rational Theology (The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuel Kant, 1996) edited and translated by Allen W. Wood.

G.W. Hegel, Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, 1827, One volume edition, trans. Peter Hodgson, (Oxford University Press, 2006; reprint of the edition of University of California Press edition)

F.W.J. Schelling, Investigations in the Essence of Human Freedom, trans. Jeff Love (SUNY, 2007)

PHI 8710 - 002 TOP:Soul/Body in Plato/Aristotle CRN: 22613

Days: T from 2:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Instructors: Helen S. Lang
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


Plato thinks that the soul and body are separate, are brought together by an external maker, and never conjoin. They are just “mixed”. Aristotle thinks that the soul is the first “entelechy” of the body and defines its activity. Body runs after soul with the result that they conjoin to make a single unified being, the individual. In this course we shall look at the evidence for these two views, both in the texts and in experience, and consider what is at stake in these different views for the larger philosophical positions of Plato and Aristotle.

PHI 8550 - 001 TOP: Body Politics CRN: 23323

Days: T from 5:30 pm to 8:00 pm in
Instructors: Annika K. Thiem
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8710 - 004 Group Agency CRN: 22615

Days: R from 5:30 pm to 8:00pm
Instructors: Georg Theiner
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


What does it mean for a group of people to do something together – to act as a group? In particular, can groups come to hold beliefs, form intentions, and become unified agents over and above the individuals who compose them? The goal of this seminar is to understand the ascription of mental attributes to groups of human beings in a variety of contexts.  For example, how can potential group agents such as firms, parties, states, unions, or expert panels achieve the required agential unification despite divergent sets of beliefs, desires, and interests among their members? What organizational principles do group agents have to satisfy in order to ensure their epistemic coherence, incentive compatibility, and responsiveness to their members?  Are group agents persons that should be accorded at least some of the rights and responsibilities which we associate with individual agents? Can collective responsibility be distributed among group members, and if so, by which criteria? In what sense can cognitive processes be distributed among the members of a group, and under which conditions can the integration of distributed resources produce emergent cognitive outcomes at the group level?  What exactly does it mean to say that communities have a collective memory, that crowds experience collective emotions, or that Web 2.0 technologies can be used to harness collective intelligence? Answering these questions with an open mind requires that we tackle an eclectic range of issues in social ontology, action theory, philosophy of mind, psychology, cultural anthropology, and social and political philosophy.

Texts:

Frédéric Bouchard and Philippe Huneman (Eds.) (2013), From Groups to Individuals: Evolution and Emerging Individuality, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Daren Brabham (2013), Crowdsourcing, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Barbara Ehrenreich (2007), Dancing in the Streets: A History of Collective Joy, New York: Metropolitan Books.

Maurice Halbwachs (1950/1992), On Collective Memory, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Christian List and Philip Pettit (2011), Group Agency: The Possibility, Design, and Status of Corporate Agents, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Keith Sawyer (2005), Social Emergence: Societies as Complex Systems, New York: Cambridge University Press.

Additional readings include articles or book chapters by Searle, Bratman, Gilbert, Velleman, Pettit, Helm, Tomasello, Goldstone, Hutchins, Smiley, Gold and Sugden, Wilson, Heylighen, Benkler, Olick, Hirst and Manier, Campbell, Sutton, Tribble, Rolin, Giere, Baber, Haidt, Huebner, Theiner and others.

 PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN:22616

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8835 - 001 Independent Study II CRN:22617

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN:22618

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation  CRN: 23316

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

 

PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 23317

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: Walter Brogan
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020