Fall 2012 (Graduate)

Below is a listing of the Graduate classes being offered for Fall 2012. For information on specific times, days and instructors, please check  the Master Class Schedule on NOVASIS.


PHI 7230 - 001 Aristotle: Practical Phi CRN: 22073

Days: T from 02:30 pm to 05:00 pm in VASEY 208.
Instructors: Walter Brogan (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

PHI 7910 - 001 Hegel's Phenom of Spirit CRN: 22075

Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 05:30 pm in VASEY 208.
Instructors: William J. Desmond (P)
Comment: Course Dates: 8/27/12 - 10/10/12;

The major purpose of this seminar is to read Hegel’s Phenomenology to get a sense of the work as a whole and the underlying dynamic and logic that inform it. It is a large and important work, considered by some to be one of the greatest works in the history of western philosophy. While we may not have time to discuss all of it in class, students are asked to make an effort to read the text as a whole. In class we will look at some of the most important parts, with the following emphases:  First, simply trying to make sense of what Hegel is saying and what he intends. This means letting Hegel speak on his own terms.  Second, formulating some sense of the development in specific parts, as well as of the movement of the work as a whole. Third, formulating some of the main questions that arise in relation to Hegel’ s thinking in this work. This may mean raising questions in terms other than Hegel’s own.

 Texts:
1. G.W.F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, trans. A.V.Miller (Galaxy Books)

Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8350 - 001 Foucault CRN: 22078

Days: W from 06:00 pm to 08:30 pm in VASEY 208.
Instructors: John Carvalho (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

This course will make a careful reading of volumes two and three of Foucault’s History of Sexuality series – The Use of Pleasure and The Care of the Self – drawing on the lectures Foucault was giving at the College de France and in California in the period leading up to the publication of these volumes, including The Government of Ourselves and Others and Fearless Speech, as well as the secondary literature published by commentators on this work.

PHI 8710 - 001 SEM:Marx and Marxism CRN: 22079

Days: T from 05:30 pm to 08:00 pm in VASEY 208.
Instructors: Annika K. Thiem (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

This course will examine the challenges of and possibilities for philosophical contributions to the critique of political economy. We will consider practices of economic temporality (e.g., profit rate, accumulation, technological innovation, speculation) and spatiality (e.g., urbanization, population management, colonialism and imperialism, uneven development). The seminar will begin by studying the early Marx and Marx and Engels’ critique of industrial capitalism before moving to more contemporary critiques of neoliberalism and financial capitalism to inquire into the relationships between economic developments, political interventions, and social change.

 
PHI 8710 - 002 SEM:Embodied Mind CRN: 22081

Days: R from 05:30 pm to 08:00 pm in VASEY 208.
Instructors: Georg Theiner (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Within contemporary philosophy of mind, to say that mind, self, and cognition are embodied is to claim that mental phenomena are constituted not only by what’s going on inside a person’s brain, but depend intimately on the person’s body beyond the brain and, more inclusively, the world in which the person is situated.  The goal of this seminar is to understand the significance of this claim, and to articulate the nature of the suggested dependence relation.

Acting as a dis-embodied foil for our discussion will be a narrowly circumscribed mechanistic approach to cognition which forms the core of classical cognitive science.  According to this approach, thinking is a form of computation operating on symbolic representations that are physically realized solely inside the brain.  Despite its commitment to physicalism, classical cognitive science epitomizes a broadly Cartesian vision of cognition as an inner, solitary, ratiocinative, detached, and general-purpose mechanism that is wedged between action and perception, and can be studied without regard to one’s body and environment.

Over the past three decades, the once-dominant cognitivist paradigm has increasingly come under attack by a loosely-knit family of research programs emphasizing the embodied, embedded, extended, and/or enactive character of cognition (“4E-cognition”).  Advocates of 4E-cognition span a large network of research communities (including philosophy, psychology, linguistics, neuroscience, robotics, sociology, anthropology, science studies, gender studies, and informatics), taking their cues from disparate sources such as Continental philosophy (esp. Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Wittgenstein), American Pragmatism (esp. Peirce, Dewey, and Mead), pioneers in psychology (from Vygotsky to Gibson) and biology (from Uexküll to Varela).  (At this point, one is tempted to cite Fodor’s quip that in intellectual history, everything happens twice: first as philosophy and then as cognitive science).  Because of the sheer diversity of sources and evidence on which proponents of 4E-cognition have drawn, it is often difficult to determine whether they belong to one church or many.

The main task in our seminar will thus be to compare and contrast the intellectual enterprises which are grouped together under the banner of 4E-cognition.  In what ways do they depart from the Cartesian paradigm, and how exactly does each of them conceive of the role which embodiment and situatedness play for mind and cognition?  How do they differ in their ontological commitments and methodological practices?  Are there any unifying themes that go beyond a shared opposition to traditional “dis-embodied” approaches; and if so, what are they?  What is the relationship between philosophical and scientific approaches to 4E-cognition more generally?  Finally, how does all of this matter for our understanding of what kinds of beings we are?

 Selected Readings:

·       Andy Clark (2008), Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension, OUP.

·       Hubert Dreyfus (1992), What Computers Still Can’t Do, MIT Press.

·       Anthony Chemero (2009), Radical Embodied Cognitive Science, MIT Press.

·       Shaun Gallagher (2006), How the Body Shapes the Mind, Clarendon Press.

·       Shaun Gallagher, Ed. (2011), The Oxford Handbook of the Self, OUP.

·       Alva Noë (2006), Action in Perception, MIT Press.

·       Robert Rupert (2009), Cognitive Systems and the Extended Mind, OUP.

·       Lawrence Shapiro (2010), Embodied Cognition, Routledge.

·       John Stewart, Olivier Gapenne, & Ezequiel Di Paolo, Eds. (2011), Enaction: Towards a New Paradigm    for Cognitive Science, MIT Press.

·       Michael Wheeler (2005), Reconstructing the Cognitive World: The Next Step, MIT Press.

 
PHI 8830 - 001 Independent Study I CRN: 22082

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 8870 - 001 Consortium I CRN: 22084

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 9010 - 001 Dissertation CRN: 22085

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney (P)
Restrictions:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance


PHI 9081 - 001 Dissertation Continuation CRN: 22086

Days: TBA Location: TBA
Instructors: James J. McCartney (P)
Restrictions: Must be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
Graduate Arts and Sciences
May not be enrolled in one of the following Campuses:
University Alliance

Prerequisites:
PHI 9000 or PHI 9010 or PHI 9020