GWS Podcasts

Lecture: CJ Pasco - "Bullied: Youth, Gender, and Homophobia."

CJ Pascoe is an American sociologist and author. She is currently a professor in the department of Sociology at the University of Oregon. Her research focuses on gender, youth, homophobia, sexuality, and new media. Her book, Dude You’re A Fag: Masculinity in High School (2007) examines how masculinity is defined through dominance and control. Her book explores masculinity as enacted by male and female bodied students, the consequences of a strict gender system, high-school boys and homophobic language, heternormativity within the school system, racialized masculine ideals, and acts of resistance to the gendered social order. Her research has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, American SexualityMagazine, and Insider Higher Ed.

Lecture: Sohaila Abulali - Sexual Violence in India: Everything is Different or Everything is the Same

Sohaila Abdulali was born in Bombay (now Mumbai), and lives in New York. She got her Bachelor's degree in Sociology and Economics at Brandeis University and her Master's in Communication at Stanford University. She has worked on sexual assault issues as a writer, counselor, and activist, since she was a senior in college. She has published two novels, three children's books, short stories, journalism pieces, development articles, and, in her capacity as freelance writer and editor, has done everything from writing scientific reports to editing a book on hedge funds. Sohaila consults with several non-profit agencies based in South Africa and the US, and writes a fortnightly column, "Mind The Gap," for Mint, an Indian newspaper. Her op-ed on rape, which was published in the New York Times last year.

A panel presentation with John Culhane, Professor, Widener Law
Fr. Joseph Calderone, Campus Ministry, Jessica Streeter, Isabelle Barker, and Ken Oakes PERSPECTIVES ON SAME SEX MARRIAGE IN PENNSYLVANIA

Since the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act in June 2013, many gay couples have been challenging analogous state laws, claiming that they too are unconstitutional. This panel will explore same sex marriage in Pennsylvania through a variety of perspectives, including John Culhane, Professor of Law at Widener University and co-author of "The Same Sex Legal Kit for Dummies"; Fr. Joseph Calderone, Associate Director of Pastoral Care Education, Campus Ministry; as well as several local Philadelphians who have a stake in same-sex marriage laws in the Commonwealth: Isabella Barker, a litigant who filed a law suit against Pennsylvania;  Jessica Streeter, visiting professor of Sociology at Villanova; and, Ken Oakes, a disability rights activist and member of the vestry at Christ Church.

Lecture: Anne Kornblut - "Women in Presidential Politics: What Next?"

Anne E. Kornblut, author of "Notes From the Cracked Ceiling: Hillary Clinton, Sarah Palin and What it will Take for a Woman to Win," is a White House correspondent for the Washington Post. She has covered the last three presidential campaigns -- including the Hillary Clinton campaign from start to finish -- and has been in Washington as a reporter since 1998. A 1994 graduate of Columbia University, she has also been a staff reporter for the Boston Globe and the New York Times, and is a regular guest on television news shows.

Lecture: Susan Wells - "Our Bodies, Ourselves and the Work of Writing"

Susan Wells is a professor of English at Temple University. Her most recent publication, Our Bodies, Ourselves and the Work of Writng (2010) is  a rhetorical and sociological analysis of 1973's Our Bodies, Ourselves, the landmark guide to women's health that became best seller. Wells's analysis also considers the ways The Bosten Women's Health Book Collective, who produced the book, worked together to invent new ways of conveying medical information. Wells has also written a book on 19th century women physicians entitled, Out of the Dead House.

Lecture: Anne Kornblut - "Women in Presidential Politics: What Next?"

Lecture: Susan Wells - Our Bodies, Ourselves and the Work of Writing