Elizabeth Cady Stanton Conference

Every spring, the Gender and Women’s Studies program organizes the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Conference to highlight and celebrate gender focused work produced by students from across the university during the previous year. Undergraduate and graduate students present their work on panels or through performance. The afternoon culminates with a keynote address by a nationally recognized scholar or performer.

The 26th annual Elizabeth Cady Stanton Student Research Conference will be held on Thursday, March 26th. Our keynote speaker will be Lauren Berlant, George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor, Department of English, University of Chicago. Berlant is the author of a series of ground-breaking works on the politics of affect and emotion, including Cruel Optimism (2011) and Sex, or the Unbearable (2014).

Students are encouraged to present work that engages gender, sexuality or feminist theories at the upcoming conference. The ECS conference is an exciting opportunity for you to showcase your work, discuss your interests with students and faculty from different programs and departments, and experience first-hand the broad range of intellectual disciplines that Gender and Women’s Studies encompasses!

This is an exciting opportunity to showcase your work, discuss your interests with students and faculty from the area, and see the broad range of intellectual disciplines that Gender and Women’s Studies encompasses!

Projects or papers completed during Spring and Fall 2014 are eligible for submission. All student submissions are considered for awards in a range of categories. The deadline for submission will be in early February and full guidelines and our call for papers will be available later in the fall.

The conference is free and open to the public. Students and faculty are welcome to attend the panel sessions and the keynote address.

Questions? Email us: ecs.villanova@gmail.com or call 610-519-3815

Eligibility for Submission

To be eligible for submission:

A paper must engage gender theories; a paper written about women or men, or a man or a woman, is not sufficient.

For example, a paper might use a lens which distinguishes actions and reactions caused by gender prejudice, critically discuss the ways that gender functions in some aspect of society, or analyze a text using other elements from feminist theory.

With the exception of those written by first year students, students are encouraged to include outside sources in a bibliography or reference section.