Course Catalog

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Fall 2014

ETH 2050 - 001 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21985 

Days: MWF from 08:30 am to 09:20 am
Instructors: Timothy K. Lent   

ETH 2050 - 002  The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21986 

Days: MWF from 08:30 am to 9:20 am
Instructors: Kevin Vander Schel  

This course explores the question of the good life and the nature of the human good. The long history of reflection on these themes in the western intellectual tradition has significantly shaped our understandings of human morality and continues to impact the ways we respond to contemporary moral questions. In this course, we will examine a variety of notable ethical theories ranging from classical to contemporary sources, paying particular attention to the distinctive vision of human flourishing articulated in the Roman Catholic and Augustinian tradition. In addition, we will consider a number of pressing and controversial contemporary moral challenges, regarding issues such as world poverty, economic and political justice, immigration, human sexuality, bioethics, abortion and euthanasia, and the rapidly changing environment. Through careful reading and active discussion, students will be encouraged to expand and deepen their understandings of the ethical life and will be challenged to reevaluate their relationship to themselves, to others, and to the natural environment.

ETH 2050 - 003 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21987 

Days: MWF from 09:30 am to 10:20 am
Instructors: Timothy K. Lent   

ETH 2050 - 004 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21988 

Days: MWF from 9:30 am to 10:20 am
Instructors: Kevin Vander Schel

This course explores the question of the good life and the nature of the human good. The long history of reflection on these themes in the western intellectual tradition has significantly shaped our understandings of human morality and continues to impact the ways we respond to contemporary moral questions. In this course, we will examine a variety of notable ethical theories ranging from classical to contemporary sources, paying particular attention to the distinctive vision of human flourishing articulated in the Roman Catholic and Augustinian tradition. In addition, we will consider a number of pressing and controversial contemporary moral challenges, regarding issues such as world poverty, economic and political justice, immigration, human sexuality, bioethics, abortion and euthanasia, and the rapidly changing environment. Through careful reading and active discussion, students will be encouraged to expand and deepen their understandings of the ethical life and will be challenged to reevaluate their relationship to themselves, to others, and to the natural environment.

ETH 2050 - 005 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21989 

Days: MWF from 10:30 am to 11:20 am
Instructors: Michelle J. Falcetano

ETH 2050 - 006 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21990 

Days: MWF from 11:30 am to 12:20 pm
Instructors: John V. Garner

There is at least one question to which we each implicitly respond in our daily lives, even in our most un-reflective choices and habits. This question is, "What is a good life?" This course asks students to pose this question more explicitly and reflectively than we do in everyday life. While undertaking this questioning for ourselves, we will explore together in class and through readings a series of responses taken from the history of ethics (e.g., Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Marx, Mill, and Catholic Social Teaching). We will also explore readings from controversial fields such as animal ethics, marriage and sexual ethics, and business ethics. We will learn (a) to think through important traditional distinctions in ethics, such as the division between deontology, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics, (b) to challenge and develop our own ethical assumptions, and, finally, (c) to write critically, blog, and communicate in class about our own assessments of the often challenging and controversial views presented by our readings.

ETH 2050 - 007 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21991 

Days: MWF from 11:30 am to 12:20 pm
Instructors: John V. Garner

There is at least one question to which we each implicitly respond in our daily lives, even in our most un-reflective choices and habits. This question is, "What is a good life?" This course asks students to pose this question more explicitly and reflectively than we do in everyday life. While undertaking this questioning for ourselves, we will explore together in class and through readings a series of responses taken from the history of ethics (e.g., Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Kant, Marx, Mill, and Catholic Social Teaching). We will also explore readings from controversial fields such as animal ethics, marriage and sexual ethics, and business ethics. We will learn (a) to think through important traditional distinctions in ethics, such as the division between deontology, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics, (b) to challenge and develop our own ethical assumptions, and, finally, (c) to write critically, blog, and communicate in class about our own assessments of the often challenging and controversial views presented by our readings. 

ETH 2050 - 008 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21992 

Days: MWF from 11:30 pm to 12:20 pm
Instructors: John-Patrick Schultz  

Everyone wants to live a “good life”—but how can we be sure that we’re actually living such a life?  In this course we’ll ask about what it means to live a “good life” by means of dialogue with some of the major ethical thinkers in the history of the West.  But it is just as important for our task that we bring those thinkers into conversation with our world and our lives in order to ask how we can live a “good life”.  Therefore, we’ll explore the intersections of the ethical philosophies we will read with contemporary moral issues.

ETH 2050 - 009 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21993 

Days: MWF from 12:30 pm to 01:20 pm
Instructors: John-Patrick Schultz

Everyone wants to live a “good life”—but how can we be sure that we’re actually living such a life?  In this course we’ll ask about what it means to live a “good life” by means of dialogue with some of the major ethical thinkers in the history of the West.  But it is just as important for our task that we bring those thinkers into conversation with our world and our lives in order to ask how we can live a “good life”.  Therefore, we’ll explore the intersections of the ethical philosophies we will read with contemporary moral issues. 

ETH 2050 - 010 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21994 

Days: MWF from 12:30 pm to 01:20 pm
Instructors: Michelle J. Falcetano

ETH 2050 - 011 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21995 

Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm
Instructors: Mark J. Doorley  

This course involves students in the ongoing conversation about what constitutes the good life. That conversation involves ancient and modern thinkers, both philosophers and theologians, as well as people alive today, struggling with questions that each generation seeks to answer: What is the good life? What does justice demand of me? Of us? Does it matter what I believe about human nature, or about God, or about society when it comes to how I live my life? Is being happy the same thing as being a good person? One goal of the course is to provide students with “toe holds” into this longstanding conversation. Another goal is to enable students to engage these resources as they might bear upon some contemporary moral challenge and/or reality. These goals will be accomplished through a combination of the following: reading challenging texts, examining some contemporary moral challenges, and writing essays designed to synthesize the insights of the first two activities.

ETH 2050 - 012 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21996 

Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm
Instructors: Brett T. Wilmot

This course will introduce you to classic and contemporary sources in ethics, including primary sources from thinkers such as Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. We will be exploring how these sources have contributed to different traditions of moral thought and how these traditions continue to contribute to our contemporary moral and political discourse. This will involve reading and discussing a range of contemporary sources that draw on these thinkers and the traditions to which they have contributed in defending moral positions on particular contemporary topics, including sexual ethics, euthanasia and assisted suicide, and economics. The main objectives are to promote a more sophisticated grasp of the moral dimensions of human life and an increased awareness of our continued participation in complex, living traditions of critical reflection and debate on what it means to be moral and how to live a good human life. 

ETH 2050 - 013 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21997 

Days: MW from 01:30 pm to 02:45 pm
Instructors: James M. Murdoch

ETH 2050 - 014 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21998 

Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm
Instructors: Ashley U. Vaught

ETH 2050 - 015 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 21999 

Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm
Instructors: Mark A. Wilson  

This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of moral reasoning from both philosophical and religious perspectives. We will begin by examining basic methods and theories in ethics and then will spend the majority of the semester exploring a range of contemporary issues in medicine, international relations, business, the environment, and social justice. Utilizing real-world cases to frame our study, we will probe the challenges and tensions in applied moral reasoning. Through this course one should grow to understand the complexity of these topics and to appreciate how religious and philosophical thought inform public discourse in the United States today. Along the way, we will ask whether individuals or groups have a responsibility to protect the interests of vulnerable populations: fetuses, political communities under attack, sick and dying patients, and the culturally marginalized. Students should come away from the course better able to contemplate and critically analyze issues of great importance for their personal, professional, and civic lives.

ETH 2050 - 016 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22000 

Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm
Instructors: Christopher P. Noble  

ETH 2050 - 017 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22001 

Days: MW from 04:30 pm to 05:45 pm
Instructors: Mark E. Graham  

This course is an introduction to significant figures and theories in the western ethical tradition. Ethics seeks to answer questions such as, What makes a human being good or bad? What constitutes a life well-lived? What makes an action right or wrong?  How should our political, economic, and social institutions be structured? and What responsibilities do we have to God, ourselves, family, friends, strangers, the poor and oppressed, animals, or the environment? We will survey a number of philosophers and theologians who have grappled with these perennial questions. Part of our attention will be devoted to understanding and critically assessing foundational components of various ethical theories. Another component of this course focuses on the contribution of the Judaeo-Christian ethical tradition. On a practical level, we will assess the implications of these theories by examining the normative moral conclusions each entails when applied to contemporary moral issues.

ETH 2050 - 018 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22002 

Days: MW from 04:30 pm to 05:45 pm
Instructors: Christopher P. Noble

ETH 2050 - 019 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22003 

Days: TR from 08:30 am to 09:45 am
Instructors: Timothy Jussaume  

In this class, we will discuss classical moral theory (Aristotle, Kant, Mill, etc.) as well as its application to contemporary moral dilemmas. More specifically, this class will focus on euthanasia, abortion, education, economics, and the environment as important areas of ethical concern. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to use these issues as a springboard to deepen our personal understanding of what constitutes the "good life."

ETH 2050 - 020 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22004 

Days: TR from 08:30 pm to 09:45 am
Instructors: Christopher M. Davidson

This class explores the great ethical forms of thought that Western philosophy and theology have developed over many centuries. These systems of thought still inform our lives and actions today, and we rely on them to understand our behavior and that of others. All of us are seeking the good life - but are you sure that you are pursuing the true good in the best possible way?

ETH 2050 - 021 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22005 

Days: TR from 10:00 am to 11:15 pm
Instructors: Jules van Schaijik

ETH 2050 - 022 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22006

Days: TR from 10:00 am to 11:15 am
Instructors: Timothy Jussaume

In this class, we will discuss classical moral theory (Aristotle, Kant, Mill, etc.) as well as its application to contemporary moral dilemmas. More specifically, this class will focus on euthanasia, abortion, education, economics, and the environment as important areas of ethical concern. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to use these issues as a springboard to deepen our personal understanding of what constitutes the "good life."

ETH 2050 - 023 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22007

Days: TR from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Instructors: Cynthia R. Nielsen

This course examines a perennial and deeply relevant question: what is the good life for human beings? This question has occupied the world’s greatest thinkers and continues to be a question of utmost concern not only for philosophers and theologians but for all humans. Given our social character, inquiry regarding the good life is not only a concern for one’s self, it is likewise a concern for the good of others, including others with whom we differ. Of course not everyone agrees concerning in what the good life consists. Even in a community where there is consensus about the basic principles of a morally good life, sharp disagreements persist over whether particular lives are acceptable variations that rightfully and justly embody these principles. Many factors such as culture, upbringing, social narratives, legal structures, educational opportunities, social class, ethnicity, and so forth can and do influence our self-formation, social identity, and how we think about moral issues. In this course we shall read and critically analyze primary texts from ancient, medieval, modern, and present-day thinkers (including critical race and feminist theorists) in order to discern which view or views best uphold true human flourishing and universal justice.

ETH 2050 - 024 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22008 

Days: TR from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Instructors: Christopher M. Davidson  

This class explores the great ethical forms of thought that Western philosophy and theology have developed over many centuries. These systems of thought still inform our lives and actions today, and we rely on them to understand our behavior and that of others. All of us are seeking the good life - but are you sure that you are pursuing the true good in the best possible way?

ETH 2050 - 025 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22009 

Days: TR from 11:30 am to 12:45 pm
Instructors: Jules van Schaijik

ETH 2050 - 026 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22010

Days: TR from 01:00 pm to 02:15 pm
Instructors: Cynthia R. Nielsen

This course examines a perennial and deeply relevant question: what is the good life for human beings? This question has occupied the world’s greatest thinkers and continues to be a question of utmost concern not only for philosophers and theologians but for all humans. Given our social character, inquiry regarding the good life is not only a concern for one’s self, it is likewise a concern for the good of others, including others with whom we differ. Of course not everyone agrees concerning in what the good life consists. Even in a community where there is consensus about the basic principles of a morally good life, sharp disagreements persist over whether particular lives are acceptable variations that rightfully and justly embody these principles. Many factors such as culture, upbringing, social narratives, legal structures, educational opportunities, social class, ethnicity, and so forth can and do influence our self-formation, social identity, and how we think about moral issues. In this course we shall read and critically analyze primary texts from ancient, medieval, modern, and present-day thinkers (including critical race and feminist theorists) in order to discern which view or views best uphold true human flourishing and universal justice.

ETH 2050 - 027 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22011 

Days: TR from 01:00 pm to 02:15 pm
Instructors: Peter Wicks  

Ethics is the attempt to come to an understanding of the nature of the good life – i.e. what it is for a human life to go well – and to provide reasoned answers to questions concerning the right way to act. In this course we will examine some of the ethical theories that have exerted the strongest influence in the Western intellectual tradition and which continue to influence contemporary ethical thought. We will also consider a range of contemporary moral controversies, including the nature and extent of our obligations to help those in need, the ethical challenges involved in modern work, the ethics of marriage and family life, and our moral obligations with regard to animals and the environment.

ETH 2050 - 028 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22012 

Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm
Instructors: Brett T. Wilmot

This course will introduce you to classic and contemporary sources in ethics, including primary sources from thinkers such as Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. We will be exploring how these sources have contributed to different traditions of moral thought and how these traditions continue to contribute to our contemporary moral and political discourse. This will involve reading and discussing a range of contemporary sources that draw on these thinkers and the traditions to which they have contributed in defending moral positions on particular contemporary topics, including sexual ethics, euthanasia and assisted suicide, and economics. The main objectives are to promote a more sophisticated grasp of the moral dimensions of human life and an increased awareness of our continued participation in complex, living traditions of critical reflection and debate on what it means to be moral and how to live a good human life.

ETH 2050 - 029 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22013

Days: TR from 02:30 pm to 03:45 pm
Instructors: Timothy Jussaume

In this class, we will discuss classical moral theory (Aristotle, Kant, Mill, etc.) as well as its application to contemporary moral dilemmas. More specifically, this class will focus on euthanasia, abortion, education, economics, and the environment as important areas of ethical concern. Ultimately, the goal of the course is to use these issues as a springboard to deepen our personal understanding of what constitutes the "good life."

ETH 2050 - 030 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22014 

Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm
Instructors: Brett T. Wilmot

This course will introduce you to classic and contemporary sources in ethics, including primary sources from thinkers such as Aristotle, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill. We will be exploring how these sources have contributed to different traditions of moral thought and how these traditions continue to contribute to our contemporary moral and political discourse. This will involve reading and discussing a range of contemporary sources that draw on these thinkers and the traditions to which they have contributed in defending moral positions on particular contemporary topics, including sexual ethics, euthanasia and assisted suicide, and economics. The main objectives are to promote a more sophisticated grasp of the moral dimensions of human life and an increased awareness of our continued participation in complex, living traditions of critical reflection and debate on what it means to be moral and how to live a good human life.

ETH 2050 - 031 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22015 

Days: TR from 04:00 pm to 05:15 pm
Instructors: Christopher M. Davidson  

This class explores the great ethical forms of thought that Western philosophy and theology have developed over many centuries. These systems of thought still inform our lives and actions today, and we rely on them to understand our behavior and that of others. All of us are seeking the good life - but are you sure that you are pursuing the true good in the best possible way?

ETH 2050 - 100 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22016 

Days: M from 06:10 pm to 08:50 pm
Instructors: Sarah-Vaughan Brakman

ETH 2050 - 101 The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 23338 

Days: R from 06:00 pm to 09:30 pm
Instructors: Peter Wicks  

Ethics is the attempt to come to an understanding of the nature of the good life – i.e. what it is for a human life to go well – and to provide reasoned answers to questions concerning the right way to act. In this course we will examine some of the ethical theories that have exerted the strongest influence in the Western intellectual tradition and which continue to influence contemporary ethical thought. We will also consider a range of contemporary moral controversies, including the nature and extent of our obligations to help those in need, the ethical challenges involved in modern work, the ethics of marriage and family life, and our moral obligations with regard to animals and the environment.

ETH 2050 - H01 HON: The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22017

Days: TR from 10:00 am to 11:15 am
Instructors: Cynthia R. Nielsen

This course examines a perennial and deeply relevant question: what is the good life for human beings? This question has occupied the world’s greatest thinkers and continues to be a question of utmost concern not only for philosophers and theologians but for all humans. Given our social character, inquiry regarding the good life is not only a concern for one’s self, it is likewise a concern for the good of others, including others with whom we differ. Of course not everyone agrees concerning in what the good life consists. Even in a community where there is consensus about the basic principles of a morally good life, sharp disagreements persist over whether particular lives are acceptable variations that rightfully and justly embody these principles. Many factors such as culture, upbringing, social narratives, legal structures, educational opportunities, social class, ethnicity, and so forth can and do influence our self-formation, social identity, and how we think about moral issues. In this course we shall read and critically analyze primary texts from ancient, medieval, modern, and present-day thinkers (including critical race and feminist theorists) in order to discern which view or views best uphold true human flourishing and universal justice.

ETH 2050 - H02 HON: The Good Life: Ethics & Contemporary Problems CRN: 22018 

Days: MW from 03:00 pm to 04:15 pm
Instructors: Sarah-Vaughan Brakman

ETH 4975 - 001 Independent Study in Ethics CRN: 22019

Days: TBA
Instructors: Mark J. Doorley

News

Here are some of our past and upcoming events. Visit this section often to keep up-to-date on all of the exciting things happening in the program.

Annual Ethics Lecture

Ethics for Lunch Schedule

Annual Undergraduate Ethics Symposium

Annual Praxis Award in Professional Ethics

Learn more about the Catherine of Siena Ethics Teaching Fellowship

Returning Soldiers' Project