Master of Arts in Classical Studies

The Master of Arts program in Classical Studies is open to candidates who have completed an undergraduate degree in Classics (or the equivalent), with evidence of academic distinction and aptitude for pursuing graduate work in the Classics program.

Those whose first language is not English and do not hold a degree from a U.S. institution of higher education are required to take the TOEFL exam and achieve a minimum score of 550 points, unless they have an undergraduate degree from a U.S. institution of higher education.

Though secondary-school teachers pursue the Villanova M.A. in Classical Studies, the degree is not strictly a degree in teaching, but rather prepares one to practice—or at least to appreciate—scholarship in the field. Believing that teaching and scholarship reinforce each other, our faculty is committed to teaching the protocols of academic writing and research. Students will have the opportunity not only of delivering research presentations but also of writing seminar papers under the careful guidance of professors who are also published scholars.

In addition to courses in the major authors and genres, we regularly offer an array of other courses, including some in history, like "Rome 133 B. C. to 31 B. C;" some with a pedagogical slant; and others with a technical focus, like Latin Prose Composition. Inasmuch as a strong Classics program gives students the option of doing advanced work in both ancient languages, we also offer courses in Greek literature regularly. To enrich their study and acquire a broader knowledge of the classical world, Master's degree candidates may also take two courses in related fields like ancient history, archaeology, and philosophy.

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Two Tracks of Study

In Fall 2010, the Classics Program instituted two new tracks allow students to better focus their study and fulfill their academic aspirations while enhancing their credentials for doing so.

When students finish 5 of their required 10 courses (earning fifteen credit hours), they will need to choose between two tracks, each with different distribution and comprehensive exam requirements: (1) Latin (2) Greek and Latin. Graduates will still receive a Master's degree in Classical Studies, but the track they choose will also appear on their transcript.

Distribution Requirements
The distribution requirements for the two new tracks, which will ensure adequate coverage of the chosen course of study, are as follows:

The Latin track requires a total of ten courses (thirty credit hours), of which up to two (2) courses may be in related fields. At least eight (8) of the required ten courses must be in Latin. Of these eight courses at least two (2) must be in Latin prose and two (2) in Latin poetry, respectively (a total of four courses).

The Greek and Latin track requires a total of ten courses (thirty credit hours), of which up to two (2) courses may be in related fields. At least four (4) of the required ten courses must be taken in Greek and four (4) in Latin. The four Greek and four Latin courses must include at least one course in poetry and one course in prose in each language, respectively (a total of four courses).

Comprehensive Examinations
Comprehensive examinations differ for the two concentrations, as follows:

The Latin track requires two (2) three-hour exams (one in Latin translation; the other in Roman history and the history of Roman literature).

The Greek and Latin track requires two (2) three-hour exams (one in Greek translation, Greek history, and the history of Greek literature; the other in Latin translation, Roman history, and the history of Roman literature).